More action songs U-Z

Up, down, turn around

Up I stretch on tippy toe

Walk all around

Walk and stop

Way up in the sky

We are woodmen sawing trees

We’ll hop, hop, hop like a bunny

We’re marching in our wellingtons

We’re marching to the drum

What is an insect?

Wheels keep turning

Wiggle and freeze

Willum he had seven sons

Wishi ta

With my little broom

You can stamp your feet

Last updated: 7/12/2021 10:50 AM

The songs below are part ofAway we go’ Round and about

compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

Up, down, turn around 🔊

 

 


Get moving - one for the beginning and the end of the day.

 

Follow instructions!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Up, down, turn around,

Touch the sky and touch the ground.

Wiggle your fingers, wiggle your toes,

Wiggle your shoulders and say, “Hello!”

 

Up, down, turn around,

Touch the sky and touch the ground.

Jiggle your tummy, blink your eyes,

Blow a kiss and wave “Goodbye!”

 


 

 

 

Up I stretch on tippy-toe 🔊

 

 


Move and sing high and low. A game from ‘This little puffin’.

 

Line 1. Stretch up high. 2. Bend low to touch heels. 3. Stretch arms high. 4. Bend knees to curl down low.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Up I stretch on tippy-toe,

Down to touch my heels I go.

Up again my arms I send,

Down again my knees I bend.

 


 

 

 

Walk all around  🔊

 

 


This song includes both energetic and quiet movements plus stillness – the most difficult of all for young children! It used to be sung as ‘Walk all around, boys’ - ‘kids’ or ‘guys’ would also be gender non-specific.

 

Move (walk, hop, tiptoe etc.) in and out of each other around the room. When the music stops sit or stand still before setting off again as the next verse begins. Join together to make a circle as the last verse is sung.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Walk all around, now, Walk all around,

Walk all around, now, Walk all around.

Walk all around, now, Walk all around,

Walk all around, now, Walk all around…

AND

STOP!

Jump up and down, now…

Tiptoe around, now, don’t make a sound…

Stamp on the ground, now…

Circle around…

 

 


 

 

Walk and stop 🔊

 

 


A freeze / elimination game. After two or three games children can rejoin the group. Children who move can clap to the beat.

 

On the word ‘Stop!’ children stand still, anyone moving is ‘out’. Increase the difficulty by moving in different ways. Everyone comes together at the end in a circle or facing the teacher.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, well you walk and you walk and you walk and you stop!

Oh, well you walk and you walk and you walk and you stop!

Oh, well you walk and you walk and you walk and you stop!

Oh, well you walk and you walk and you walk and stop!

 

Oh, well you wiggle…

Oh, well you tiptoe…

Oh, well you bounce…

Oh, well you run…

Oh, well you hop…

Oh, well you all sit quietly with hands in your lap…

 

 


 

 

 

Way up in the sky 🔊

 

 


This song can be interpreted in two ways; as a sentimental action play for todlers and youngsters or in a more mocking style as in the scouting tradition with exaggerated movements and loud voices towards the end of the song.

 

Thrown up hands, flywith your hands. Rock cupped hands. Rest head on hands.

Flap left then right crooked arm. Make sleeping action as before. Whisper SHHH!

Shout SLEEPING! Draw a sun, show falling dew with hands and wiggling fingers. Throw out hands at each ‘good morning’. Open and close thumbs and forefingers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Way up in the sky,

The little birds fly,

While down in their nest

The little birds rest.

With a wing on the left,

And a wing on the right,

The dear little birds slumber all through the night,

SHHH! They’re SLEEPING!

The bright sun comes up,

The dew falls away,

“Good Morning,” “Good Morning.”

The little birds say.

 

 


 

 

 

We are woodmen sawing trees O

 

 


An opportunity for strong movements. Even more fun in the woods.

Investigate the connection between the wood growing there and the paper we use. Where else is wood used. In the days when I was a child we made wooden stilts and often grazed our knees falling off them!

 

Mime the actions suggested by the words

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


We are woodmen sawing trees,

Sawing, sawing, sawing trees.

We don’t stop for wind or weather,

We keep sawing all together;

We are woodmen sawing trees,

Sawing, sawing, sawing trees.

 

The tree falls down with a great big crash!

Now we all will take an axe,

And chop and chop with all our might,

To get some wood for the fire to light;

We are woodmen sawing trees,

Sawing, sawing, sawing trees.

 

Watch us carry logs along,

As we sing our merry song;

Tra la la la la la la, etc.

 


 

 

We’ll hop, hop, hop like a bunny  🔊

 

 


This can be played as an action rhyme moving appropriately round the room or as the hand play below.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

Verse 1. Make a hopping motion with finger rabbit ears. Fingers run. Fists thump up and down. Hands jump up and down. Verse 2. Swim with one hand on top of the other with thumbs out. Cross hands at wrists and flap. Fold arms then put finger to lips.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


We’ll hop, hop, hop like a bunny,

And run, run, run, like a dog.

We’ll walk, walk, walk like an elephant

And jump, jump, jump like a frog.

We’ll swim, swim, swim like a goldfish,

And fly, fly, fly like a bird

We’ll sit right down and fold our hands

And say not a single word.

 

 


 

 

We’re marching in our wellingtons 🔊

 

 


One for the very young preferably outside on a wet day. If inside use hoops as below.

3rd verse by Dany Rosevear.

 

Verse 1. & 2. Walk around the hoops with strong stamping steps.

Verse 3. & 4. Wave arm for a trunk. Stamp in and out of the hoops. Stamp to home base.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


We're marching in our wellingtons,

Tramp, tramp, tramp!

We're marching in our wellingtons,

We won't get damp!

 

We’re marching in our wellingtons,

Step, step, step!

Marching in our wellingtons,

We won’t get wet!

 

We’re marching just like elephants,

Stamp, stamp, stamp!

Splashing through the puddles,

We want to get damp!

 

Splashing through the puddles,

In the rain, rain, rain!

Splashing through the puddles,

Then splashing home again!

 


 

 

We’re marching to the drum 🔊

 

 


Move to the beat of the drum, sometimes noisily. Some times quietly.

 

1. March briskly around 2. Run in and out of each other, no touching! 3. Bounce around 4. Tiptoe quietly. 5. Sit and clap to the drum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


We’re marching to the drum,

We’re marching to the drum,

Hi ho the derry oh

We’re marching to the drum,

And the drum says “STOP!”

 

We’re running round the room…

We’re jumping everywhere…

We’re creeping silently…

We’re sitting on the floor…

 


 

 

 

What is an insect? 🔊

 

 


This song might help you remember some of the basic facts about insects. Find out more at: https://www.dkfindout.com/uk/animals-and-nature/insects/useful-insects/

 

1. Touch head, chest and tummy each time. 2. Hold up six fingers, point to legs. 3. Put forefingers up to side of head and waggle. 4. Slap body, put hands over head. 5. Flap elbows, wag finger from side to side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Head and thorax, abdomen, abdomen, abdomen,

Head and thorax, abdomen, has each insect!

 

Every insect has six legs, has six legs, has six legs,

Every insect has six legs, six legs has each insect!

 

Antennae help them feel and taste, feel and taste, feel and taste,

Antennae help them feel and taste, two antennae!

 

Their bodies have an outer case, outer case, outer case,

Their bodies have an outer case, it protects each insect.

 

Most insects have two pairs of wings, two pairs of wings, two pairs of wings,

Most insects have two pairs of wings, some don’t have any!


 

 

 

Wheels keep turning O

 

 


A little nostalgia written by Graham Beebee.

Some will remember this from BBC or ABC (1989’) ‘Play school’, others from the LP ‘Bang on a drum’ and yet others classroom singing from the Apusskidu’ song book published in 1975 by A&C Black.

Discuss different kinds of machines and how they might move.

 

Move body like a machine with arms working like levers. Then move in and out of others moving in the same way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Some machines are fun to watch

And make a funny sound;

With some oil on, they go quieter,

That’s what I have found.

Up and down the levers go,

Pistons to and fro.

Motors churning, Brrrm! Brrrm!

Wheels keep turning, Brrrm! Brrrm!

Round and round and round and round

And round and round and round.


 

 

Wiggle and freeze O

 

 


A lively song with a cheerful beat by Cathy Bollinger, find more of her songs at:

Ready to Learn! Songs for School Success .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I’ve got a wiggle, wiggle, wiggle in my wiggling feet,

And a wiggle, wiggle, wiggle to the wiggling beat,

I’ve got a wiggle in my toes, a wiggle in my knees,

And when the music stops… everyone freeze!

 

I’ve got a march, march, march in my feet,

And I march, march, march to the beat,

I’ve got a march in my toes, a march in my knees,

And when the music stops, everyone freeze

 

I’ve got a jump, jump, jump in my feet,

And I jump, jump, jump to the beat,

I’ve got a jump in my toes, a jump in my feet,

And when the music stops… everyone freeze!

 

I’ve got a tiptoe, tiptoe in my feet,

And I tiptoe, tiptoe to the beat,

I’ve got a tiptoe in my toes, a tiptoe in my knees,

And when the music stops… everyone freeze!

 

I’ve got a hop, hop, hop in my feet,

And I hop, hop, hop to the beat,

I’ve got a hop in my toes, a hop in my knees,

And when the music stops… everyone freeze!

 


 

 

 

Willum he had seven sons O

 

 


A song in the minor key. Move to a steady beat.

 

This song is probably originally a Swedish one but I have yet to identify a song in that language.

The actions suggested here suit building a timber house in Sweden or the U.S.A. In the U.K. where brick houses are more common laying bricks’ would be a good substitution for ‘stacking wood’.

 

Mime actions suggested by the words.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Willum he had seven sons

Seven sons, seven sons

Willum he had seven sons

And this is what he did.

 

He sent them out to build a house,

Build a house, build a house,

He sent them out to build a house,

And this is what they did.

 

Number one was chopping wood,

Chopping wood, chopping wood,

Number one was chopping wood,

And that is what he did.

 

Number two jumped up and down…

Number three was stacking wood…

Number four was hammering…

Number five was painting doors…

Number six was clapping…

Number seven was sleeping…

 


 

 

Wishi ta doya 🔊

 

 


‘River song’, this Native American chant calls up two different moods of water: gentle flowing eddies and streams, then the fast movement of swirling, tumbling, white water. The third verse is not traditional but works well as an alternative rhythm perhaps of drumming rain and lightening.

1. Move hands across body like flowing water.The same to one side then the other. 2.Make heavy rain fall down with fingers. Roll arms one way then the other.

3. Beat fists on knees and clap hands. Repeat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Wishi ta doya, doya, doya,

Wishi ta doya, doya,hey! 2x

 

Washa ta neya heya heya,

Washa ta neya heya hey! 2x

 

Boom, boom, boom, boom, clap, clap, clap, clap!

Boom, boom, boom, boom, clap, clap, clap!

 


 

 

With my little broom O

 

 


From ‘New nursery Jingles’ by Elizabeth Barnard published in 1939.

Make large movements in a big space ending up on the floor with hands to cheek or small ones, perhaps at bedtime, just using hand movements.

 

Mime actions suggested by the words.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


With my little broom I sweep, sweep, sweep;

On my little toes I creep, creep, creep.

With my little eyes I peep, peep, peep;

On my little bed I sleep, sleep, sleep.

 


 

 

 

You can stamp your feet O

 

 


Also called ‘The freeze game’. Great for encouraging stillness. It can also be played as a party game where children are ‘out’ if they move.

 

Mime actions suggested by the words.  Older children can freeze as a shape, tree, balloon etc. and see if others can identify it.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


You can stamp your feet,

You can knock your knees,

You can sway… and shake… and spin…

And when the music stops, you can freeze!

 

You can swing your arms,

You can skip along,

You can step… and jump… and hop…

And when you’ve had enough, you can stop!

 


 

 

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