Whatever the weather M-W

Michael Finnegan

Mr. Frog

Noah

Oh, oh, the sunshine

One misty moisty morning

Rain come wet me

Rain is falling all around

The cold old house

The mitten song

The rainbow fairies

The weather witch

What the birds say

When the rain is falling down

Windy weather

Who has seen the wind?

 

Last updated: 8/1/2017 3:00 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we gocompiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

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© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

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Michael Finnegan O

 

A song I learnt at college. The verses are many and various.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was an old man named Michael Finnegan,

He grew whiskers on his chin-i-gan,

The wind came out and blew them in again,

Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin again!

 

There was an old man named Michael Finnegan,

He went fishing with a pin-a-gan,

Caught a fish and dropped it in again,

Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin again!

 

There was an old man named Michael Finnegan,

He fell down and broke his shin-i-gan,

Folks said ‘Mike, you’ll never swim again’,

Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin again!

 

There was an old man named Michael Finnegan,

He grew fat and then grew thin again,

Then he died, and had to begin again,

Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin again!

 


 

Mr. Frog O

 

Poor old frog –it can be so very wet if you venture away from the pond.

 

Get jumping – in and out of the pond.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Jump, jump jumpetty jump,

Jump, jump jumpetty jump.

Mr. Frog jumped out of the pond one day,

And found himself in the rain.

“Oh dear, I’ll get wet

And might catch a cold,

A-a-a-tchooooo!

So he jumped in the pond once again!

 


 

Noah O

 

My favourite interpretation of the Noah story. This is one I learnt from the BBCs Music Box programme. It was written by Veronica Clark.

 

Mime movement of the water and the animals. Enjoy making the animal noises.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Well the rain came down and the waters rose,

It swished and it swirled round the animals’ toes.

Noah said as he opened the doors,

‘Stand in pairs and wipe your paws.’

 

First came the ducks, Quack, quack!

Followed by the cats, Miaow, miaow!

Then came the owls, Twit-twoo!

Followed by the rats, Eek, eek!

 

Then came the sheep Baa, baa!

Followed by the dogs Woof, woof!

Then came the snakes Hiss, hiss!

Followed by the frogs Ribbet, ribbet!

 

Then came the pigs Oink, oink!

Followed by the larks Chirrup, chirrup!

Then came the ants… Silence

Followed by the sharks Swish, swish!

 

Then came the tigers Growl, growl!

Cow and bull Moo, moo!

‘STOP!’ said Noah, Clap, clap, clap!

‘The ark is full.’ Hip hip hooray!

 

Well the rain came down and the waters rose,

It swished and it swirled round the animals’ toes.

Noah said as he closed the doors,

I’m glad they came in twos and not in fours!

 



 

 

One misty moisty morning O

 

 


A song for Autumn or Spring mornings.

The verse is the first of fifteen stanzas of the ‘Wiltshire wedding’ a broadside balled printed about 1680s. There are many tunes to be found. I would have liked to have sung the one from BBCs Time and Tune, Spring 1961 and originally from 60 songs for little children; but this tune, adapted from the 70s Steeleye Span version, sat too firmly in my head!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One misty, moisty, morning,

When cloudy was the weather,

T’was there I met an old man

Clothed all in leather;

Clothed all in leather,

With a cap beneath his chin.

With a how d’you do, and how d’you do,

And how d’you do again?

 

One misty, moisty, morning,

When cloudy was the weather,

T’was there I met an old man

Clothed all in leather;

He began to compliment,

And I began to grin,

With a how d’you do, and how d’you do,

And how d’you do again?


 

Oh, oh, the sunshine O

 

A song from Texas from ‘American songs for children’ 1948 by Ruth Crawford Seeger.

This song covers clothing weather and colour topics!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, oh, the sunshine,

Oh, oh, the sunshine,

Oh, oh, the sunshine,

Sally's got a red dress, buttoned behind,

Sally's got a red dress, buttoned behind.

 

Oh, oh, you can’t shine,

Oh, oh, you can’t shine,

Oh, oh, you can’t shine,

Ethan has green wellies on, ready for rain,

Ethan has green wellies on, ready for rain.

 

Nancy has blue jeans, buttoned in front…

Isaac has black shoes with Velcro on top…

 


 

 

Rain come wet me O

 

 


Another song from Texas from ‘American songs for children’ 1948 by Ruth Crawford Seeger. This one I have changed slightly to make more of the weather theme.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rain come wet me,

Sun come dry me.

Keep away, thunderstorms,

Don’t come a-nigh me.

 

Rain come wet me,

Sun come dry me.

Fly my way, snowy days,

Down, down, right by me.


 

 

Rain is falling all around  🔊

 

 


Words and music: Moiselle Renstrom, 1889–1956 from ‘Merrily we sing’ published in 1948.

Sing the verses that work best with your seasonal topic.

This would also work well as a hand play; wiggle fingers downwards, make a roof shape and make rain fall on the specified body parts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rain is falling all around,

On the housetops on the ground,

Rain is falling on my nose,

On my head and hands and toes.

 

Sun is shining all around,

On the housetops on the ground,

Sun is shining on my nose,

On my head and hands and toes.

 

Wind is blowing all around,

On the housetops on the ground,

Wind is blowing on my nose,

On my head and hands and toes.

 

Leaves are falling all around,

On the housetops on the ground,

Leaves are falling on my nose,

On my head and hands and toes.

 

Snow is falling all around,

On the housetops on the ground,

Snow is falling on my nose,

On my head and hands and toes.


 

 

 

The cold old house O

 

 


This anonymous rhyme came from BBC Radio’s wonderful Poetry Corner, Spring 1973; Tune by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I know a house, and a cold old house,

A cold old house by the sea.

If I were a mouse in that cold old house,

What a cold, cold mouse I’d be!

 


 

 

 

The mitten song O

 

 


This rhyme for winter was written by Marie Allen Howarth circa 1957 and published in a ‘Pocketful of poems’.

 

1. Both thumbs up 2. Fingers together as in mittens with thumbs up 3.Wave mittens back and forth 4. Hold arms and shiver 5. Shrug shoulders 6. Stroke hands 7. Show proudly 8. Continue as before

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


“Thumbs in the thumb place,

Both thumbs up

Fingers all together!”

Fingers together as in mittens with thumbs up

This is the song,

We sing in mitten weather.

Wave mittens back and forth

When it's cold, hold arms and shiver

It doesn't matter whether, shrug shoulders

Mittens are wool, stroke hands

Or made of finest leather. show proudly

This is the song,

We sing in mitten weather:

“Thumbs in the thumb place,

Fingers all together!”


 

 

 

The north wind doth blow O

 

Winter is a on its way and the cold winds begin to blow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The north wind doth blow,

And we shall have snow,

And what will the robin do then, poor thing?

He’ll sit in the barn and keep himself warm,

And hide his head under his wing, poor thing!

 

The north wind doth blow,

And we shall have snow,

And what will the dormouse do then, poor thing?

Rolled up like a ball,

In a nest snug and small,

He’ll sleep till warm weather comes in, poor thing!

 

The north wind doth blow,

And we shall have snow,

And what will the children do then, poor things?

When lessons are done,

They must skip, jump and run,

Until they have made themselves warm, poor things!


 

 

The rainbow fairies  🔊

 

 


Based on the poem The Rainbow Fairies by L M Hadley. Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Two little clouds, one summer's day,

Went flying through the sky;

They went so fast they bumped their heads,

And both began to cry.

 

Old Father Sun looked out and said:

"Oh, never mind, my dears,

I'll send my little fairy folk

To dry your falling tears."

 

One fairy came in violet,

And one wore indigo;

In blue, green, yellow, orange and red,

They made a pretty row.

 

They wiped the cloud-tears all away,

And then from out the sky,

Upon a line of sunbeams made,

They hung their gowns to dry.

 


 

 

The weather witch O

 

A song for sailors.

I found this song in BBC Radio for schools Time and Tune: Spring term 1966. Cannot find out much more about it though it can supposedly be sung as a round.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


‘Blow wind, blow wind!’ cried three men together;

‘Nay, nay, nay wind,’ sang the Witch of Weather.

In their cobble sat those sailors three-o;

Till the wind blows, they’ll not go to sea-oh.


 

 

What the birds say O

 

 


Another song from ‘Infant Joy’; a popular collection of songs when I first began teaching in the 1960s. There are no acknowledgements in the book to recognise the provenance of this song and at present (2015) it is nowhere to be found on the internet, hence the need to get it out there!

Do let me know if you have more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The ducks swim around when it’s raining all the day.

They swim and they swim but all that they say

Is, “Quack, quack, quack, quack, oh, isn’t it fun,

Quack, quack, quack, quack, rain is better than sun.

 

The blackbird he sits on the top of the tree,

He says all you people just listen to me:

“Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! This is a fine song:

Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! Not a moment too long.”

 

The cuckoo is heard when the year is at Spring,

But only two notes is he able to sing,

“Cuckoo! Cuckoo! I’m here till July,

Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Then away I fly.”

 

The cock in the farmyard cries, “Cock-a-doodle-doo!”

I wish you good morning, good morning to you,

Doodle-doo, doodle-doo, I’ll wake you at dawn

Doodle-doo, doodle-doo, I’m the head of the farm.


 

 

When the rain is falling down 🔊

 

 


Get out and about whatever the weather.

A song from ABC’s Playschool. Last two verses written by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


When the rain is falling down,

Falling down, falling down,

Up will go my big umbrella,

When the rain is falling down.

 

When the snow comes floating down,

Floating down, floating down,

Up will go a big fat snowman,

When the snow comes floating down.

 

When the sun comes out to play,

Out to play, out to play,

Coats and scarves and gloves go flying,

When the sun comes out to play.


 

 

 

Windy weather O

 

 


The outside play area this would be a great place to play this game if the leaves have fallen.

 

Verse 1: Swirl up and down individually in and out of each other. Verse 2: Find a partner, hold hands facing and bob up and down. Verse 3: Come together in a ring and move to the centre with hands raised.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Windy weather, windy weather,

When the wind blows,

The leaves swirl round together.

 

Windy weather, windy weather,

When the wind blows,

The boats all bob together.

 

Windy weather, windy weather,

When the wind blows,

We’ll all come together.

 


 

 

Who has seen the wind? O

 

A poem by Christina Rossetti.

 

Move fingers like the leaves moving on the trees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Who has seen the wind?

Neither you nor I nor you;

But when the leaves hang trembling,

The wind is passing through,

The wind is passing through.

 

Who has seen the wind?

Neither you nor I;

But when the trees bow down their heads,

The wind is passing by,

The wind is passing by.

 

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