Whatever the weather M-W

Michael Finnegan

Morning greetings

Mr. Frog

Noah

Oh, oh, the sunshine

Oh, it’s wet, wet, wet

One misty moisty morning

Paddling in the puddles

Pitter-patter raindrops

Rain come wet me

Rain is falling all around

Rain poem / Spring rain

Raindrops keep fallin’ on my head

Shower and sunshine

Song of the wind

Sun on the clover

 

Last updated: 2/7/2022 11:25 AM

The songs below are part ofAway we gocompiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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Michael Finnegan O

 

 


A song I learnt at college. The verses are many and various.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was an old man named Michael Finnegan,

He grew whiskers on his chin-i-gan,

The wind came out and blew them in again,

Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin again!

 

There was an old man named Michael Finnegan,

He went fishing with a pin-a-gan,

Caught a fish and dropped it in again,

Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin again!

 

There was an old man named Michael Finnegan,

He fell down and broke his shin-i-gan,

Folks said ‘Mike, you’ll never swim again’,

Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin again!

 

There was an old man named Michael Finnegan,

He grew fat and then grew thin again,

Then he died, and had to begin again,

Poor old Michael Finnegan. Begin again!

 


 

 

Morning greetings  🔊

 

 


Whatever the weather there’s a verse for each kind, look out of the window and describe.

Adapted by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


We’re here today to work and play,

Good morning! Good morning!

It’ such a white and snowy day,

Good morning! Good morning!

 

We’re here today to work and play,

Good morning! Good morning!

It’ such a wet and rainy day,

Good morning! Good morning!

 

We’re here today to work and play,

Good morning! Good morning!

It’ such a bright and sunny day,

Good morning! Good morning!

 

We’re here today to work and play,

Good morning! Good morning!

It’ such a cold and windy day,

Good morning! Good morning!


 

 

Mr. Frog O

 

 


Poor old frog –it can be so very wet if you venture away from the pond.

Get jumping – in and out of the pond.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Jump, jump jumpetty jump,

Jump, jump jumpetty jump.

Mr. Frog jumped out of the pond one day,

And found himself in the rain.

“Oh dear, I’ll get wet

And might catch a cold,

A-a-a-tchooooo!

So he jumped in the pond once again!

 


 

 

Noah O

 

 


My favourite interpretation of the Noah story. This is one I learnt from the BBCs Music Box programme. It was written by Veronica Clark.

 

Mime movement of the water and the animals. Enjoy making the animal noises.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Well the rain came down and the waters rose,

It swished and it swirled round the animals’ toes.

Noah said as he opened the doors,

‘Stand in pairs and wipe your paws.’

 

First came the ducks, Quack, quack!

Followed by the cats, Miaow, miaow!

Then came the owls, Twit-twoo!

Followed by the rats, Eek, eek!

 

Then came the sheep Baa, baa!

Followed by the dogs Woof, woof!

Then came the snakes Hiss, hiss!

Followed by the frogs Ribbet, ribbet!

 

Then came the pigs Oink, oink!

Followed by the larks Chirrup, chirrup!

Then came the ants… Silence

Followed by the sharks Swish, swish!

 

Then came the tigers Growl, growl!

Cow and bull Moo, moo!

‘STOP!’ said Noah, Clap, clap, clap!

‘The ark is full.’ Hip hip hooray!

 

Well the rain came down and the waters rose,

It swished and it swirled round the animals’ toes.

Noah said as he closed the doors,

I’m glad they came in twos and not in fours!

 


 

 

Oh, its wet, wet, wet 🔊

 

 


Whatever the weather there is always something you can do outdoors.

Oh, how children love to be outside in the rain, water play is in their souls!

The other day I got absolutely drenched and by the time I got home and into dry clothes this song was written.

Each verse can also be used independently depending on the weather conditions or as three verses together

Words and music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, its wet, wet, wet,

As it can get, get, get,

The rain, the rain is tumbling down.

With our waterproofs

And our shiny rubber boots,

We’ll stamp in the puddles all around!

Splish! Splash! Splosh!

 

It fell white, white, white,

All through the night, night, night,

The snow, the snow came drifting down.

Put on your scarf and mitts

And your coat, licketty split,

Then make a big snowman fat and round.

Hooray!

 

Oh, its hot, hot hot,

Like it or not, not, not,

The sun, the sun is shining down.

In the woods you could stop,

Find a cool shady spot,

And have a picnic on the ground!

Yummy, yum, yum!


 

 

 

One misty moisty morning O

 

 


A song for Autumn or Spring mornings.

The verse is the first of fifteen stanzas of the ‘Wiltshire wedding’ a broadside balled printed about 1680s. There are many tunes to be found. I would have liked to have sung the one from BBCs Time and Tune, Spring 1961 and originally from 60 songs for little children; but this tune, adapted from the 70s Steeleye Span version, sat too firmly in my head!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One misty, moisty, morning,

When cloudy was the weather,

T’was there I met an old man

Clothed all in leather;

Clothed all in leather,

With a cap beneath his chin.

With a how d’you do, and how d’you do,

And how d’you do again?

 

One misty, moisty, morning,

When cloudy was the weather,

T’was there I met an old man

Clothed all in leather;

He began to compliment,

And I began to grin,

With a how d’you do, and how d’you do,

And how d’you do again?


 

 

Oh, oh, the sunshine O

 

 


A song from Texas from ‘American songs for children’ 1948 by Ruth Crawford Seeger.

This song covers clothing weather and colour topics!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, oh, the sunshine,

Oh, oh, the sunshine,

Oh, oh, the sunshine,

Sally's got a red dress, buttoned behind,

Sally's got a red dress, buttoned behind.

 

Oh, oh, you can’t shine,

Oh, oh, you can’t shine,

Oh, oh, you can’t shine,

Ethan has green wellies on, ready for rain,

Ethan has green wellies on, ready for rain.

 

Nancy has blue jeans, buttoned in front…

Isaac has black shoes with Velcro on top…

 


 

 

Paddling in the puddles  🔊

 

 


Make the most of the wet weather with this lively action game outside. Also learn simple prepositions. This could also be played indoors with hoops or skipping ropes.

Words and music by Dany Rosevear.

The actions are self explanatory!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Paddling in the puddles,

Paddling in the puddles

Paddling in the the puddles

When the rain comes down.

 

Jumping over puddles…

Running round the puddles…

Splashing through the puddles…

Hop in and out the puddles…

 

Time to go inside,

Time to go inside,

Goodbye to the puddles,

It is time to go inside!


 

 

Pitter-patter raindrops  🔊

 

 


A Spring time rain song and hand play.

A traditional song adapted and set to music by Dany Rosevear.

1. Fingers flutter downwards. 2. Place cupped hand over pointed first finger. 3. Shape sun with hands. 4. Cup hands together and open slowly. 5. Place hands with open fingers to sides of cheeks, smile and lift head. 6. Sweep a rainbow arc over head.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pitter patter raindrops,

Falling from the sky;

Here's my umbrella,

To keep me safe and dry,

When the rain is over,

And the sun begins to glow,

Little flowers begin to bud,

And grow and grow and grow!

Watch them smile and raise their heads,

Under my rainbow.


 

 

 

Rain come wet me O

 

 


Another song from Texas from ‘American songs for children’ 1948 by Ruth Crawford Seeger. This one I have changed slightly to make more of the weather theme.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rain come wet me,

Sun come dry me.

Keep away, thunderstorms,

Don’t come a-nigh me.

 

Rain come wet me,

Sun come dry me.

Fly my way, snowy days,

Down, down, right by me.


 

 

Rain is falling all around  🔊

 

 


Words and music: Moiselle Renstrom, 1889–1956 from ‘Merrily we sing’ published in 1948.

Sing the verses that work best with your seasonal topic.

This would also work well as a hand play; wiggle fingers downwards, make a roof shape and make rain fall on the specified body parts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rain is falling all around,

On the housetops on the ground,

Rain is falling on my nose,

On my head and hands and toes.

 

Sun is shining all around,

On the housetops on the ground,

Sun is shining on my nose,

On my head and hands and toes.

 

Wind is blowing all around,

On the housetops on the ground,

Wind is blowing on my nose,

On my head and hands and toes.

 

Leaves are falling all around,

On the housetops on the ground,

Leaves are falling on my nose,

On my head and hands and toes.

 

Snow is falling all around,

On the housetops on the ground,

Snow is falling on my nose,

On my head and hands and toes.


 

 

Rain poem / Spring rain 🔊

 

 


A delightful wet weather poem by Elizabeth Coatsworth, 1893-1986. Music by Dany Rosevear. Learn about similes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The rain was like a little mouse,

Quiet, small, and gray,

It pattered all around the house

And then it went away.

It did not come, I understand,

Indoors at all, until,

It found an open window, then

Left tracks across the sill.


 

 

Raindrops keep fallin’ on my head 🔊

 

 


After a dry April it’s May and the rains have come – mostly sunshine and showers but mixed with heavy clouds, hail and downpours. But the swifts have returned from Africa so summer must be on its way!

Words and music written by Hal David and Burt F Bacharach.for the 1969 film ‘Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Raindrops keep fallin' on my head,

And just like the guy whose feet are too big for his bed,

Nothin' seems to fit.

Those raindrops are fallin' on my head,

They keep fallin'!

 

So, I just did me some talkin' to the sun,

And I said I didn't like the way he got things done;

Sleepin' on the job.

Those raindrops are fallin' on my head,

They keep fallin'!

 

But there's one thing I know,

The blues they send to meet me

Won't defeat me.

It won't be long 'til happiness

Steps up to greet me.

 

Raindrops keep fallin' on my head,

But that doesn't mean my eyes will soon be turnin' red;

Crying's not for me,

'Cause I'm never gonna stop the rain by complainin'.

Because I'm free - nothing's worryin' me.


 

 

Song of the wind 🔊

 

 


A weather hand play.

These two verses are based on a Suzuki piece of music for beginners on the violin which in turn is adapted from ‘Fox you must bring back my goose’ a German folk song.

Arrangement by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Listen to the sound of wind, I hear it in the trees,

Hear it in the trees,

See it in the branches bending, leaves and blossoms swirling down,

See it in the leaves and blossoms swirling to the ground.

 

Down below a crocodile snap snapped at all he saw,

Snapped at all he saw,

Then he ate a rock and got a toothache in his jaw-aw-aw,

Then he ate a rock and got a toothache in his jaw.


 

 

 

Sun on the clover 🔊

 

 


After all our recent rainfall it is delightful to encounter the blue skies and sunshine once again. The clothes-line under such circumstances are the best place for clothing to dry!

A cheerful poem by Louise Fabrice Handcock.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There's sun on the clover

And sun on the log,

Sun on the fish pond

And sun on the frog.

 

Sun on the honeybee,

Sun on the crows,

Sun on the clothesline

To dry the clean clothes.

 


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