Songs for the Christmas season (inc Thanksgiving)

 

A turkey ran away

A turkey sat on a backyard fence

As I came over Yonders Hill

(The turkey song)

Bake a cake for Christmas

Bright morning star

Christmas Eve in Trinidad

Christmas is coming

Christmas pudding

Clap your tiny hands

Dame get up and bake your pies

Also: Mister Turkey and Mister Duck

Christmas songs: 📦 F-S 🔔🔔 T-Z 🎅

 

 

Last updated: 11/21/2017 4:27 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we gocompiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

Return to the ‘Singing games for children’ home page

To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

A turkey ran away O

 

This Appalachian Thanksgiving song (which possibly has Danish origins) can easily be adapted for the Christmas season; just make up new verses to include seasonal foods. Verses 4&5 are by Derek Pearson. Last verse added by Dany Rosevear.

 

Roll arms or walk round on the spot each time ‘rolled’ is sung. Jump up for ‘potato’. Flap elbows for each ‘gobble’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A turkey ran away,

Before Thanksgiving Day.

Said he, “They’ll make a meal of me,

If I should stay!”

 

A pumpkin rolled away,

Before Thanksgiving Day.

Said she "They’ll make a pie of me,

If I should stay!”

 

A cranberry rolled away,

Before Thanksgiving Day.

Said he, “They’ll make a meal of me,

If I should stay!”

 

A nice potato too,

Jumped from the ground and flew.

Said she "They’ll roast me through and through,

If I should stay!”

 

And then a brussel sprout

Said “Now I must get out,

I’m sure they’ll boil my life away

If I should stay!”

 

A turkey ran away,

Before Thanksgiving Day.

Crying, “Gobble gobble, gobble, gobble,

Gobble gobble, gobble!”

Yes , “Gobble gobble, gobble, gobble,

I’m off and away!


 

 

A turkey sat on a backyard fence O

(Gobble, gobble, gobble)

 

 


A song for Thanksgiving by Margaret I. Simpson and June M. Norton from a 1950s book ‘Singing and Rhyming’.

 

Flap elbows for each ‘gobble’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A turkey sat on a backyard fence

And he sang this sad, sad tune,

“Thanksgiving Day is coming, gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble,

And I know I’ll be eaten soon.

Gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble,

I would like to run away,

Gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble, gobble,

I don't like Thanksgiving Day!”


 

As I came over Yonders HillO

(The turkey song)

 

A folk song from Northern Wisconsin;

It is sometimes sung as ’yonder hill’ Roud no: 4234

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


As I came over Yonders Hill, mime going over a hill

I spied a mighty turkey, make a monocle with hands

He flapped his wings and he spread his tail

Flap elbows then spread hands in front

And his feet were awful dirty.

Point to feet, clap twice and click heels.

Chorus:

Fol link a tidy, Pat legs twice, clap hands twice

Fol de link a tidy o, Pat legs x2, pat shoulders x2

Fol link a tidy, As above

And his feet were awful dirty. As above.

 

I met him by an old beech tree,

And told him he looked pretty,

He flapped his wings and he spread his tail

But his feet looked awful dirty.

 

And so I said to that turkey bird,

"How would you taste for dinner?"

He flapped his wings and he spread his tail

And he made himself look thinner.

 

"You can't catch me, my little laddie,

I've got a wife and children,"

He flapped his wings and he spread his tail

And he took to the woods a running.

 

So I went back over Yonders Hill,

Without that mighty turkey,

He flapped his wings and he spread his tail

And his feet looked awful dirty.


 

 

Bake a cake for Christmas

 

 


A seasonal cooking and feasting rhyme for Christmas.

Haven’t been able to find this rhyme anywhere – any ideas!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bake a cake for Christmas,

Stir it with a spoon,

Pop it in the oven and

Pull it out at noon.

Spread the frosting on it;

What a pretty sight!

For you and me and Santa Claus,

To see on Christmas night.

 

Bake a cake for Christmas,

Stir it with a spoon,

Pop it in the oven and

Pull it out at noon.

Spread the frosting on it;

Hip, hip, hooray!

Now you and me and Santa Claus,

Shall eat it on Christmas day.

Mmmmh!


 

 

 

Bright morning star 🔊

 

 


A simple and beautiful Appalachian folk song and spiritual from Kentucky is adapted by Steeleye Span for Christmas. This one works paticularly well when sung with others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bright morning star a-rising,

Bright morning star a-rising,

Bright morning star a-rising,

Day is a-breaking in my soul.

 

It is shining on the shepherds x3

Day is a-breaking in my soul.

 

Come see the wise men travelling x3

Day is a-breaking in my soul.

 

And hear the Angels singing x3

Day is a-breaking in my soul.

 

Bright morning stars a-rising x3

Day is a-breaking in my soul.


 

 

Christmas Eve in Trinidad 🔊

 

 


This was a popular song for the Christmas festivities when I taught at Wilkes Green School in Handsworth, Birmingham in the 1960s. Many of the children in class were born of recently arrived Jamaicans immigrants; it didn’t seem to matter that the song was based in Trinidad – the calypso rhythm was the attraction.

Words and music by: Massie Patterson and Sammy Heyward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Santa, whatya doing Christmas Eve?

At my house what are you going to leave;

Santa how you going to make the reindeer go?

In Port of Spain Santa we don’t have snow.

 

Christmas Eve in Trinidad,

Children are good not one is bad.

What a night for girls and boys,

Santa will bring them plenty of toys.

 


 

Christmas is coming O

 

 


This rhyme was written by. The original version has ‘Please to put a penny’ There are several tunes some written commercially. I remember it being chanted or sung with the simple melody below..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Christmas is coming,

The geese are getting fat.

Please put a penny in the old man’s hat.

If you haven’t got a penny,

A ha’penny will do.

If you haven’t got a ha’penny,

Then God bless you!


 

 

Christmas pudding 🔊

 

 


My grandson is singing this song at his nursey this Xmas. Simple and a perfect hand play for the little ones.

 

Stir an imaginary bowl. Blow on the hot pudding. Sprinkle imaginary sugar.

Pretend to eat the pudding and rub your tummy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Christmas pudding, Christmas pudding,

Steaming hot! Steaming hot!

Sprinkle on the sugar, sprinkle on the sugar,

Eat the lot! Eat the lot!


 

 

Clap your tiny hands 🔊

 

 


Words and music arranged by Dany Rosevear.

This is a song I half heard one Sunday morning on BBC Radio 4 about thirty years ago, it was sung beautifully by some old fellow in the West Indies.

I adapted it for a Nativity play two decades ago – but didn’t record it!

It is now resurrected in a form that might be recognisable to someone out there though recent research on the internet suggests the original might have been the gospel song, ‘Clap your tiny hands for joy’.

 

This could be sung to a baby while clapping their hands gently together. Encourage young children to clap along with the music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Clap your tiny hands, clap your tiny hands,

Clap your tiny hands for me,

Clap your tiny hands, clap your tiny hands,

Clap your tiny hands for me.

 

Little children sing, Christmas joy we bring,

Clap your tiny hands for me,

Clap your tiny hands, clap your tiny hands,

Clap your tiny hands for me.

 

Little children come, Christmas time is fun…

 

Little children shout, Christmas bells ring out…


 

 

Dame, get up and bake your pies O

 

 


Midwinter festivals are nearly always accompanied by food and feasting. Everyone in the past would have been busy preparing for Christmas making sweetmeats, gingerbread, marzipan treats, cakes, Christmas puddings and pies.; no visits to the supermarket! Mince pies were originally made of meat and an oval shape to represent the manger that the baby Jesus lay in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dame, get up and bake your pies,

Bake your pies, bake your pies;

Dame, get up and bake your pies,

On Christmas day in the morning.

 

Dame, what makes your maidens lie,

Maidens lie, maidens lie;

Dame, what makes your maidens lie

On Christmas day in the morning?

 

Dame, what makes your ducks to die,

Ducks to die, ducks to die;

Dame, what makes your ducks to die,

On Christmas day in the morning?

 

Their wings are cut, they cannot fly,

Cannot fly, cannot fly;

Their wings are cut, they cannot fly,

On Christmas day in the morning.

 


g

Return to the ‘Singing games for children’ home page