Autumn songs

A little man is standing within the wood

Apple and blackberry pie

Autumn leaves

Come, little leaves

Falling leaves

Glimmer lantern glimmer

Golden corn

I walk with my little lantern

My nice red rosy apples

One man shall mow my meadow

Pick up a leaf

Puff the magic dragon

Round go the seasons

Six little acorns

Squirrel Nutkin

Summer, goodbye!

Sweeping with my broom

The autumn leaves have fallen down

The farmer gathers his hay today

The farmer sows his seeds

The tree in the wood

Tick tock change the clocks

What have you brought for harvest time?

What shall we do on a nice Fall day?

Yellow the bracken

Also find:

Pick up a leaf

The leaves are green


 

 

 

Last updated: 8/16/2016 4:52 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we gocompiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2013 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

A little man is standing in the wood O

 

Or ‘The riddle’ It is folk song of German origin and was made popular in Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel opera.. The answer to the riddle is the common woodland arum lily which has many other names: lords and ladies, cuckoo pint, jack in the pulpit, wake robin.

 

Just done further research online only to find that ‘a toadstool’ is suggested as the answer to the riddle – maybe have I misremembered!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A little man is standing within the wood,

He wears a purple cloak and a small black hood.

Tell me, tell me if you can,

What's the name of this small man?

In a purple cloak and a small black hood?

 

The little man is silent and makes no sound,

He stands with only one foot upon the ground.

Tell me who this man can be,

For he will not answer me,

Standing there with one foot upon the ground?

 


 

Apple and blackberry pie O

 

Make the most of apples, blackberries and other fruit and vegetables that grow in the gardens, hedgerows and allotments; all ready for the harvest table in August and September.

 

This could be played as a double circle game:

Circles one inside the other walk round in opposite directions holding hands. On the fourth line the outer circle brings arms over the inner circle and the ring walks round as one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Apple and blackberry pie,

Apple and blackberry pie,

Sugared and crusted,

Just covered with custard,

Mmmm! Lovely apple and blackberry pie.

 

Carrot and green lentil soup,

Carrot and green lentil soup,

It’s hearty, it’s warming,

On a cold winter’s morning,

Mmmm! Lovely carrot and green lentil soup,

 

Tomato and butternut squash,

Tomato and butternut squash,

Add chickpeas - delicious

For a stew so nutritious,

Mmmm! Tomato and butternut squash,

 

Lemon and ginger root beer,

Lemon and ginger root beer,

With bubbles a-whizzing,

And busily fizzing,

Mmmm! Lovely lemon and ginger root beer,


 

 

Autumn leaves O

 

 


A song to illustrate ascending and descending pitch.

 

Move hands and body fluidly high and low in a gentle whirling twirling dance, perhaps with scarves in autumn colours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Whirling and twirling the leaves fall down.

Drifting down, round and round.

Whirling and twirling the leaves fall down,

Down, down to the ground.

 


 

 

Come, little leaves O

 

 


A poem by George Cooper 1838–1927. My version came from ‘The book of a thousand poems’ but according to some internet sources there are two more verses. There are also some great blogs to show this poem has been loved by past generations: http://www.blindpigandtheacorn.com/blind_pig_the_acorn/2013/10/appalachia-through-my-eyes-come-said-the-wind.html

 

This is another one that can be mimed by gently moving back and forth, round and round, up and down to represent the wind, leaves and snow, finishing falling gently down to the floor and sleeping.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


“Come, little leaves,” said the wind one day,

“Come over the meadows with me and play;

Put on your dresses of red and gold;

For summer is gone, and the days grow cold.”

 

Soon as the leaves heard the wind’s loud call,

Down they came fluttering, one and all;

Over the fields they danced and flew,

Singing the soft little songs they knew.

 

Dancing and whirling the little leaves went;

Winter had called them and they were content;

Soon, fast asleep in their earthy beds,

The snow laid a coverlet over their heads.

 


 

 

 

Falling leaves O

 

A very gentle song for autumn. Great as a follow up to a lively session running around outside in the fallen leaves.

 

Challenge children to play an equally gentle accompaniment – how softly can they play? Work out which percussion instruments will make the right kind of sound and how to achieve this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Leaves are falling gently,

Yellow, red and brown.

Wind is in the treetops,

Leaves are floating down.

Down, down, down.

Down, down, down.

 

Early in the morning,

All around the town.

Frost is on the window pane,

Mist is swirling round.

All around, all around.

 

Branches black and bare now

Stretch up to the sky

Floating on the water,

Leaves come drifting by

Drifting by, drifting by.

 

Rake the leaves together

Clear them from the ground

Flames are burning brightly,

Smoke is all around.

All around, all around.


 

 

Five golden leaves O

 

 


Change ‘golden’ to ‘Autumn’ if you have leaves in other colours.

 

Use fingers to show numbers of leaves or hold leaves in hand and drop one each time a verse is sung.

Alternatively children sit in a circle as five volunteers move inside like the leaves and settle on the ground one at a time as each verse is sung.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five golden leaves hanging from a tree,

Dancing golden in the sun,

Then along came the wind and it blew through the town Whoosh!

One little leaf tumbled down to the ground!

 

Four golden leaves hanging from a tree,

Dancing golden in the sun,

Then along came the wind and it blew through the town Whoosh!

And another leaf tumbled down to the ground!

 

Three… Two….

 

One golden leaf…

And the last little leaf tumbled down to the ground.

 


 

 

Glimmer lantern glimmer O

 

 


A lantern song for the festival of St Martin. The eve of Martinmas is remembered in many households with a festival of lanterns carrying light through darkened homes and the singing of songs.

 

It is a great excuse to make your own lanterns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Glimmer, lantern, glimmer,

Little stars a-shimmer,

Over meadow, moor and dale,

Flitter, flutter elfin veil,

Pee-witt, pee-witt, tick-a-tick-a-tick,

Rou-cou, rou-cou.

 

Glimmer, lantern, glimmer,

Little stars a-shimmer,

Over rock and stock and stone,

Wander tripping little gnome,

Pee-witt, pee-witt, tick-a-tick-a-tick,

Rou-cou, rou-cou.

 


 

 

Golden corn O

 

Move up and down with the pitch of the music.

Find out the direction of each point of the compass so arms can swing that way.

The first verse is traditional and the second verse by Dany Rosevear.

 

The game below is for individual movement but would work well with children holding hands in pairs.

 

Curl up small on the ground. Line 1: Move upwards with hands stretched high. Lines 2. & 3.Swing arms to one side and then the other. Lines 4.& 5. Move down to the floor. Make up movements for the second verse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Golden corn is growing so high;

The wind blows east,

And the wind blows west,

And the little brown mouse runs

Down to her nest.

 

Apple tree is growing so high;

The wind blows north,

And the wind blows south,

And the little red apples

Fall to the ground.

 


 

 

I walk with my little lantern O

 

 


A German song sung on the feast of Martinmas which falls on November 11th.

Martin was the patron saint of beggars, drunkards and outcasts and was known for an unassuming nature and ability to bring warmth and light to those in darkness.

There are many versions of this song in German and in translation. This is my take.

It is a lovely time of year to make lanterns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I walk with my little lantern,

My lantern, myself and I,

Above the stars are shining,

On Earth we are stars to the sky.

The rooster crows, the cat meows:

Hey! Hey! Hey!

La bimmel, la bummel, la bey!

Hey! Hey! Hey!

La bimmel, la bummel, la bey!

 

We walk with our little lanterns,

Our lanterns so shiny and bright,

We wind our way through the darkness,

A sea of twinkling light.

The pale moon cries as we pass by:

Hey! Hey! Hey!

La bimmel, la bummel, la bey!

Hey! Hey! Hey!

La bimmel, la bummel, la bey!

 

We walk with our little lanterns,

Our lanterns so shiny and bright,

We sing sweet songs in the darkness

Our voices so cheerful tonight.

As we walk round how good it sounds:

Hey! Hey! Hey!

La bimmel, la bummel, la bey!

Hey! Hey! Hey!

La bimmel, la bummel, la bey!

 

We walk with our little lanterns,

Our lanterns so shiny and bright,

We wander home through the darkness

With a flickering fading of light.

The flame grows dim but still we sing:

Hey! Hey! Hey!

La bimmel, la bummel, la bey!

Hey! Hey! Hey!

La bimmel, la bummel, la bey!


 

 

 

My nice red rosy apple O

 

 


Take an apple, cut it through the middle and you’ll find the shape of a star. Count the rooms and the pips.

‘Festivals, family and food’ by Diane Carey and Judy Large suggest you cut very thin slices this way so children can eat round the star.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My nice red rosy apple,

Has a secret midst unseen,

You’d see if you could slip inside,

Five rooms so neat and clean.

 

In each room there are hiding

Two pips so shining bright;

Asleep they are and dreaming

Of a lovely warm sunlight.

 

And sometimes they are dreaming

Of many things to be,

How some day they’ll be hanging

Upon a Christmas tree.

 


 

 

One man shall mow my meadow O

 

A number song (counting back) for harvest time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One man shall mow my meadow.

Two men shall gather it together.

Two men, one man and one more

Shall shear my lambs and ewes and rams,

And gather my gold together.

 

Three men shall mow my meadow.

Four men shall gather it together.

Four men, three men, two men and one more

Shall shear my lambs and ewes and rams.

And gather my gold together.

 

Five men shall mow my meadow.

Six men shall gather it together.

Six men, five men, four men, three men, two men and one more

Shall shear my lambs and ewes and rams,

And gather my gold together.

 

Seven men shall mow my meadow.

Eight men shall gather it together.

Eight men, seven men, six men, five men, four men, three men, two men and one more

Shall shear my lambs and ewes and rams

And gather my gold together.

 


 

 

Pick up a leaf O

 

 


It’s time to go on a leaf hunt!

Encourage children to identify and name the different kinds of leaves they find on Autumn walks or just during outdoor play when leaves are flying all about; every child should be able to do this – a skill that seems to have got lost since I was a child when weekly nature walks along country lanes were common.

You will need a decent chart, book or online aid such as: https://www.tescoliving.com/~/media/files/kids%20zone%20downloadable%20pdfs/woodland%20trust/hunt_leaves.pdf for effective identification.

 

Making leaf rubbings and paint printing should also help children become aware of the diversity of leaf shapes that can be found at this time of year. Autumn is also a great time for sorting leaves according to shape, colour or size.

You will need to change the words of the song to take account of common trees in your neighbourhood or country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pick up a leaf and put it in your pocket,

Pick up a leaf and put it in your pocket,

Pick up a leaf and put it in your pocket,

Autumn time is here!

 

Oak leaf, sycamore, horse chestnut and maple,

Silver birch, beech, ash, hawthorn, holly, hazel;

Name each leaf if you are able,

Autumn time is here!

 


 

 

Puff, the Magic Dragon O

 

 


Children love to join in the chorus of this song and listen to the story of Jackie Paper and his magic dragon. It might well lead into a discussion and dramatization of the story.

This song is by Leonard Lipton and Peter Yarrow of ‘Peter, Paul and Mary’ who popularised it in a 1960s recording. Find out more about this wonderful song at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puff,_the_Magic_Dragon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Puff, the magic dragon lived by the sea,

And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called Honalee.

Little Jackie Paper loved that rascal Puff,

And brought him strings and sealing wax and other fancy stuff.

 

Chorus

Puff, the magic dragon lived by the sea,

And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called Honalee.

Puff, the magic dragon lived by the sea,

And frolicked in the autumn mist in a land called Honalee.

 

Together they would travel on a boat with billowed sail;

Jackie kept a lookout perched on Puff's gigantic tail.

Noble kings and princes would bow whene'er they came,

Pirate ships would lower their flag when Puff roared out his name.

Chorus

 

A dragon lives forever but not so girls and boys,

Painted wings and giant rings make way for other toys.

One grey night it happened, Jackie Paper came no more,

And Puff that mighty dragon, he ceased his fearless roar.

 

His head was bent in sorrow, green scales fell like rain;

Puff no longer went to play along the cherry lane.

Without his life-long friend Puff could not be brave,

So Puff, that mighty dragon, sadly slipped into his cave.

Chorus (quietly)


 

 

Round go the seasons O

 

Learn the four names and orders of seasons.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Round go the seasons, seasons all four,

Winter, spring, summer, now autumn’s at my door.

Sing a song of conkers, glossy, smooth and brown.

Thread them through with strong string,

Whirl them round and round.

Crick! Crack! Summer’s gone, autumn greets the day,

Wild winter will bring frost and snow,

‘Till spring comes out to play.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Six little acorns O

 

 


A song for autumn. Learn to subtract from six.

 

1.     Hold up fingers to show the number of acorns. Make hands move like the wind.

2.     As above

3.     Show empty hands. Wiggle finger upwards and point to self.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six little acorns in an old oak tree,

The autumn winds began to blow and down came three.

 

Three little acorns in an old oak tree,

The autumn winds began to blow and down came three.

 

No little acorns in an old oak tree,

But underneath I saw one sprout, just for me!

 



 

Squirrel Nutkin O

 

A poem by F.B. Wood put to a Spanish tune.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Squirrel Nutkin has a coat of brown,

Quite the loveliest in Woodland Town.

Two bright eyes look round to see

Where the sweetest nuts may be.

 

Squirrel Nutkin in his coat of brown,

Scampers up the trees and down.

Dashing here and swinging there,

Leaping lightly through the air.

 

All the live long day he plays,

In the leafy woodland ways.

But at night when squirrels rest,

In their cosy treetop nest.

Repeat tune for last section

Bushy tail curled round his head,

Mister Squirrel goes off to bed.


 

 

Sweeping with my broom O

 

 


A lovely activity for outdoor play.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


To and fro, to and fro,

Sweeping with my broom I go,

All the fallen leaves I sweep,

In a big and tidy heap.

 


 

 

 

Summer goodbye! O

 

 


A simple seasonal song from Germany “Sommer, ade!”

Make up more couplets of things that happen as summer changes to autumn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Summer goodbye! Summer goodbye!

Winds blow the leaves away,

Autumn is here to stay.

Summer goodbye! Summer goodbye!

 

Summer goodbye! Summer goodbye!

Apples turn rosy red,

Roses sweet petals shed.

Summer goodbye! Summer goodbye!

 


 

The autumn leaves have fallen down O

 

Once the leaves have fallen off the trees there is a lot of work to do.

 

Make the actions suggested by the words.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The autumn leaves have fallen down,

Fallen down, fallen down;

The wind it came and blew them round,

And blew them all around.

 

We’ll find a brush and start to sweep,

Start to sweep, start to sweep,

We’ll pile them into a great big heap,

Into a great big heap.

 

The bonfire’s lit and burns them away,

Burns them away, burns them away;

And now they’re gone we’ll dance and play,

We’ll dance and we will play.

 


 

The farmer gathers his hay today O

 

An action game for harvest time by Wendy Bird.

 

1. Mime swaying hay, cutting it down and putting it together and shaking it dry.

2. Mime picking up apples and eating them.

3. Mime swaying corn, stretching arms up high, cutting it down and gathering it together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The farmer gathers his hay today,

It’s harvest time.

The farmer gathers his hay today,

It’s harvest time.

He cuts it down and stacks it high,

Gives it a shake, then leaves it to dry.

The farmer gathers his hay today,

It’s harvest time.

 

The farmer gathers his apples today,

It’s harvest time.

The farmer gathers his apples today,

It’s harvest time.

Red and rosy, juicy and sweet,

Lots of apples for us to eat.

The farmer gathers his apples today,

It’s harvest time.

 

The farmer gathers his corn today,

It’s harvest time.

The farmer gathers his corn today,

It’s harvest time.

It grows up high , turns golden brown,

And then he comes to cut it down.

The farmer gathers his corn today,

It’s harvest time.

 


 

The farmer sows his seeds O

 

A singing game for harvest time.

 

A small group of children (the seeds) and a farmer stand in the centre of a circle. The children in the circle make  actions to suit the words and each time ‘Oats, beans and barley-O ’is sung they stamp feet and turn round.

The seeds grow slowly as the farmer goes about his work. As the ‘sheaves’ verse is sung the circle holds hands and walk in with hands raised high and then out again. Children all clap in time to the music on the last verse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The farmer sows his seeds,

The farmer sows his seeds,

Oats, beans and barley-O

The farmer sows his seeds.

 

The wind begins to blow...

The rain begins to fall...

The sun begins to shine...

The wheat begins to grow…

The plants grow big and tall...

The farmer cuts the corn...

The binds the sheaves...

And now the harvest’s in....


 

The tree in the wood O

 

Several versions of this cumulative song were collected by Cecil Sharp in the Southern Appalachians at the beginning of the 20th century. This is a simple version for younger children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


All in a wood there grew a tree,

The finest tree you ever did see,

The tree was in the wood,

And the green leaves grew all around, around, around,

And the green leaves grew all around.

 

And on this tree there was a branch,

The finest branch you ever did see,

The branch was on the tree,

The tree was in the wood,

And the green leaves…

 

And on this branch there was a nest,

The finest nest you ever did see,

The nest was on the branch,

The branch was on the tree,

The tree was in the wood,

And the green leaves …

 

And in this nest there was an egg,

The finest egg you ever did see,

The egg was on the nest,

The nest was on the branch,

The branch was on the tree,

The tree was in the wood,

And the green leaves …

 

And on this egg there was a bird,

The finest bird you ever did see,

The bird was on the egg,

The egg was on the nest,

The nest was on the branch,

The branch was on the tree,

The tree was in the wood,

And the green leaves …

 


 

Tick tock change the clocks O

 

Remembering what happens when the clocks change is not easy; this song should help you. Explain the words ‘clockwise’ and ‘anticlockwise’. Illustrate by moving the clock’s minute hand. How many minutes are passed when moving this hand forward or back one hour.

 

Year

Clocks go forward

Clocks go back

2013

31 March

27 October

2014

30 March

26 October

2015

29 March

25 October

Hold hands and stand in a circle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tick tock, tick tock!

Remember, remember, retain and recall,

The clocks turn back one hour in the Autumn or Fall,

The mornings are lighter, the afternoon’s dark,

REMEMBER!

Spring forwards, Fall back,

Rise up with the lark.

 

Tick tock, tick tock!

Remember, remember, it’s a difficult thing,

The clocks are turned forward one hour in the Spring,

The mornings are darker, the afternoon’s light,

REMEMBER!

Spring forwards, Fall back,

Then you’ll get it right.

Stamp round clockwise.

 

Walk anticlockwise.

Skip round.

Stop.

Move into the circle and then back.

Bend knees then stretch up high.

 

Move as before but walk anticlockwise and then clockwise.

 


 

 

What  have you brought for harvest time? 🔊

 

 


A Harvest Festival song by Dave and Toni Arthur. A time to think of those in need; collect together harvest gifts ready for distribution through church or charity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


What have you brought for harvest time,

What have you brought for harvest time,

What have you brought for harvest time,

To put on the harvest table?

 

I have brought a loaf of bread,

To put on the harvest table.

 

I have bought six brown eggs… tin of beans…

 

I have bought some apples and pears…

a bunch of flowers…

 

I have bought a cabbage green…

a corn dolly for luck…

 

We hope you like our harvest food, x3

That we’ve put on the harvest table.


 

 

What shall we do on a nice Fall day 🔊

 

 


Discuss all the different activities that are fun to do in the Autumn; blackberrying, finding shiny conkers, acorns and sycamore seeds and of course those below, then get out in the fresh and mime tasks or even better do them!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


What shall we do on a nice Fall day,

A nice Fall day, a nice Fall day?

What shall we do on a nice Fall day,

When we go out to play?

 

We’ll rake the leaves on a nice Fall day…

We’ll jump in leaves on a nice Fall day…

We’ll pick apples on a nice Fall day…

 


 

 

 

 

Yellow the bracken O

 

 


A colourful picture of Autumn brilliantly evoked in this short poem by Florence Hoatson. The gentle melody by Dany Rosevear was written to reflect an end to lazy summer days.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Yellow the bracken,

Golden the sheaves,

Rosy the apples,

Crimson the leaves;

Mist on the hillside,

Clouds grey and white.

Autumn, good morning!

Summer, good night!


 

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