More circle games D-E

Dance with me

Dancing through the corn

Darby, Darby dressed in black

Dog tick

Doggie, doggie

Down in the holler

Down in the valley, two by two

Down the Mississippi

Dry bones come skipping

Fly like an eagle

Frère Jacques

Frog in the meadow

Also see:

Acka backa soda cracker

Last updated: 3/6/2018 4:33 PM

These songs are nursery rhymes and other traditional songs compiled, illustrated and music arranged by Dany Rosevear.

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2013 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.

 


 

 

Dance with me 🔊

 

 


A song of the seasons.

From ‘The 3rd 60 songs for little children’ published in 1960. Written by Helen Henschel to a Pomeranian tune. Words adapted by Dany Rosevear.

 

Dance in a circle or in pairs, swirling up and down among the falling leaves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dance with me, dance with me,

In the springtime merrily;

Dance with me, dance with me,

In the summer by the sea.

 

Dance with me, dance with me,

Swirl amongst the autumn leaves;

Dance with me, dance with me,

Gaily round the Christmas tree.

 


 

 

 

 

Dancing through the corn O

 

 


Delighted to find this harvest song in ‘Infant Joy’, 1954 by Desmond Mac Mahon, as I had already come across the tune and similar dance in the French song ‘À la Monaco’, a traditional song of war from the Ile de France; the dance is described as ‘la chaine anglaise’.

Find the French version at:

 

The first half is a circle dance. The second part is a chain as in the diagram below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dancing through the meadows in the early morn

And dancing in the green fields, dancing thro’ the corn.

This is the way we dance in the meadows,

This is the way we dance in the morn;

This is the way we dance in the green fields,

This is the way we go dancing thro’ the corn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Darby, Darby dressed in black 🔊

 

 


This traditional rhyme comes from Britain and can be found in ‘Sixty songs for little children’ published in 1933; at present I have found it nowhere else.

The original tune was composed by W. Gillies Whittaker but I have adapted it radically to make it easier to sing for young voices.

The rhyme also suggests a children’s dance so I have used a familiar format ‘Bow wow wow’ and adapted it to the words.

 

Divide the class into two or three groups (maximum six pairs). Pairs face each other in a group circle, back to back with other couples.

1. Place hands on hips, show off swinging from side to side, stamp feet; left, right, left.

2. Hold hands, walk four steps round exchanging places.

3.Tap right heels three times then toes three times.

4. Shake hands twice then jump to make a half turn and face new partner.

Repeat this sequence round the circle each time meeting and greeting each new partner with a smile – it comes naturally!

Last verse: jump to first partner, shout ‘WOW!’ in recognition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Darby, Darby dressed in black,

Silver buttons down your back,

Heel to heel and toe to toe,

This is the way we turn to go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Dog tick O

 

 


This song from Louisiana is in Ruth Crawford Seeger’s wonderful ‘American folk songs for children’ pub 1948. I used songs from this publication regularly during my teaching career.

 

The text and game below came from Dorothy Christensen, Richmond, CA, 1979.

 

Children stand in a circle holding hands tightly around a player in the centre. This child sings the first line of the song while trying to break out of the ring. The group answers with, ‘Don't care…’.If the one in the middle eventually manages to escape, the two from where the circle is broken chase and try to catch the escapee. The chaser who succeeds then becomes the new child in the centre and the game continues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dog tick, dog tick, dog tick ‘bacco worm,

Why can’t a dog tick dance like a ‘bacco worm?

Dog tick, dog tick, dog tick ‘bacco worm,

Why can’t a dog tick dance like a ‘bacco worm?

 

Circle game version:

Solo: Dog tick, dog tick, dog tick biting me.

Group: Don't care, don't care, can't get out of here.

Solo: Red ant, black ant, big ant biting me.

Group: Don't care, don't care, can't get out of here.

Solo: Bumble bee, bumble bee, bumble bee stinging me.

Group: Don't care, don't care, can't get out of here.

Solo: Grandma, grandma, grandma calling me.

Group: Don't care, don't care, can't get out of here.

 


 

 

Doggie, doggie O

 

 


A singing game to challenge children’s listening skills and an opportunity for children to sing solo.

 

Children sit in a circle with hands behind backs, one child in the ring is given a card ‘bone’ to hold. Another child ‘doggie’ sits crouched in the centre with hands over eyes.

The children in the circle sing the first and subsequent lines except when the child holding the bone sings the second line ‘Somebody stole…’ and when ‘doggie’ sings the ‘Zoo’ line of the song choosing any animal to insert instead of ‘monkey’.

At the end ‘doggie’, having listened carefully, tries to identify the thief with three tries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Doggie doggie, where's your bone?

Somebody stole it from my home.

Guess who! Maybe you…

Maybe the monkeys in the zoo.

Wake up doggie and find your bone!

 

 

Down in the holler 🔊

 

 


A pioneer play party game from Kansas collected by Lola Adams Carter (FHKSC), Dodge City, 1957 and transcribed by John Chambers. It was later published in Sackett and Koch, Kansas Folklore in 1961.

There are no instructions for playing but as it is very similar in words and tune to the New England game ‘Somebody’s waiting’ the circle game there could well be a model for ‘Down in the holler’.

 

Instructions see ‘Somebody’s waiting’: http://www.singinggamesforchildren.com/A%20Cluster%202.2%20Awaywego/20%20More%20circle%20games%20R-T%20w.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


1. Down in the holler

Where the pigs used to waller,

Oh there's somebody waitin' for me.

Take the one, leave the other,

Take the one, leave the other,

Take the one, leave the other for me.

 

2. Way down in the holler….

 


 

 

 

Down in the valley, two by two O

 

 


Make up and copy a variety of movements in a lively manner.

 

Make two circles one inside the other with partners facing.

Verse 1: Hold partners hands and ‘shimmy’ down, coming up on ‘rise, sugar.

Verse 2: The children on the inside make a movement that in the second half is copies by their partner.  

Verse 3: Move to the right to a new partner and the outside child makes a movement for their partner to copy. The game then continues as before.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Down in the valley, two by two,

My baby, two by two, my baby, two by two,

Down in the valley, two by two,

Come on and rise, sugar, rise.

 

Let me see you make a motion, two by two,

My baby, two by two, my baby, two by two,

Let me see you make a motion, two by two,

Come on and rise, sugar, rise.

 

Choose another partner, two by two,

My baby, two by two, my baby, two by two,

Choose another partner, two by two,

Come on and rise, sugar, rise.


 

 

Down the Mississippi 🔊

 

 


This playground chant or song can be played as a skipping or ball game.

 

Children stand in a circle, one child bounces a ball and on the word PUSH! bounces it towards another child. For skipping: two turn the rope and one skips in the middle jumping out on the word PUSH! as another child jumps in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Down the Mississippi where the steamboats go,

Some go fast and some go slow.

Down the Mississippi where the steamboats go, PUSH!

 


 

 

 

Dry bones come skipping O

 

 


Learn to move steadily to the beat in this cooperative song.

This is also a good opportunity to assess children’s individual singing.

 

Sitting in a circle each child places the left hand behind their back. Practice the passing motion by tapping the beat to the front and then to the right saying "me" and "you".

Once proficient they are ready to begin the game and pass the “bone” round the circle while singing. On the second couplet they stop passing and the one that has the bone has their name is sung instead of ‘’Zekial’ in the song. That child then sings “one of them bones is mine” as they tap the bone on their knee. Prepare to pass the bone once again as the game continues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dry bones come skippin’ up the valley,

One of them bones is mine.

Dry bones come skippin’ up the valley,

One of them bones is mine.

 

One of them bones is ‘Zekiel’s bones,

One of them bones is mine.

One of them bones is ‘Zekiel’s bones,

One of them bones is mine.

 


 

 

Fly like an eagle 🔊

 

 


This song is great to sing as a call and response, and is often accompanied by a dance.

It is a traditional Great Plains Native American with English words.

Two of the English verses have been modified by Dany Rosevear.

 

Dance in a circle with side steps; accompany with the movements of the eagle, salmon and bear. On the last couplet come together with hands raised, then still holding hands bow outwards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Fly like an eagle,

Flying so high,

Circling the universe

On wings of pure light.

 

Chorus:

Hey oh witchi tai tai,

Witchi tai o,

Hey oh witchi tai tai,

Ho witchi tai o.

 

Be silent like the salmon,

Swimming swift and bright,

Dart and glow like the firefly,

Children of the light.

 

Be brave like the bison,

Walking on the plains.

We can make a better world;

Together, once again.

 

We all fly like eagles,

Flying so high,

Circling the universe,

On wings of pure love.


 

 

 

Frère Jacques 🔊

                                                                

 

This is usually sung as a round. You can learn this song in other languages too; find it in Spanish at: http://www.singinggamesforchildren.com/A%20Cluster%202.5%20Spanish/113-121%20Spanish%20songs.htm.

I am not sure where I found the game below.

 

Make a single circle holding hands standing next to a partner.

Walk round in a circle first one way then the other. On the last two lines release hands and ring bells stretching up high and pulling down to the ground.

In the second verse turn to face partner and bow twice. Shake hands, first right then left. Link right arms and skip round, repeat with left arms linked.

Wave and pass each other to stand next to a new partner.

Continue as above each time the song is sung until original partner is encountered once again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Frère Jacques, Frère Jacques,

Dormez vous? Dormez vous?

Sonnez les matines! Sonnez les matines!

Din, dan, don! Din, dan, don!

Deen dan don

 

Brother John, Brother John,

Are you sleeping? Are you sleeping?

Morning bells are ringing! Morning bells are ringing!

Ding, dang dong! Ding, dang, dong!

 


 

 

 

Frog in the meadow O

 

 


A playful circle game.

 

Children sit in a circle, ‘frog’ squats in the middle. The circle sing the first two bars stirring forefingers for the second two. On the fifth bar frog with closed eyes stands and turns slowly round with arm extended and finger pointing. At the end of the song the two who are pointed at hold hands, frog approaches, separates their hands. The pair then run in opposite directions round the outside of the circle. Midway they greet each other with a ‘Good morning or afternoon’ The first to touch the frog becomes the new frog and the game continues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Frog in the meadow,

Can’t get him out.

Take a little stick

And stir him about.

Froggie, froggie,

Please come out and play with me!

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