Lavender Lane

Vintage favourites

 

I know a little cupboard

I know an old lady who swallowed a fly

Inchworm

Little boy fishin’

Little white duck

Mairzy doats and dozy doats

My grandfather’s clock

Oh, Susanna

One potato, two potato

Run rabbit, run rabbit

Last updated: 7/18/2017 4:32 PM

 

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

 

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Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

I know an old lady who swallowed a fly O

 

Who doesn’t know the old lady! – usually through the singing of Burl Ives. The words and music are by Rose Bonne and Alan Mills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I know and old lady who swallowed a fly.

I don’t know why she swallowed a fly.

Perhaps she’ll die.

 

I know and old lady who swallowed a spider,

That wiggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly,

I don’t know why she swallowed a fly.

Perhaps she’ll die.

 

I know and old lady who swallowed a bird,

How absurd to swallow a bird!

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider,

That wiggled and jiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly,

I don’t know why she swallowed a fly.

Perhaps she’ll die.

 

I know and old lady who swallowed a cat,

Just fancy that! She swallowed a cat.

She swallowed the cat to catch the bird...

 

I know and old lady who swallowed a dog,

What a hog to swallow a dog!

She swallowed the dog to catch the cat...

 

I know and old lady who swallowed a goat,

She opened her throat and swallowed a goat.

She swallowed the goat to catch the dog,

 

I know and old lady who swallowed a cow,

I don’t know how but she swallowed a cow.

She swallowed the cow to catch the goat,

 

I know and old lady who swallowed a horse

She’s dead, of course!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


I know a little cupboard O

 

A poem by Walter de la Mare and put to a charming Italian tune by Mabel F. Wilson.

I have printed the poem below as it was written though you will notice I have slightly adapted the order and words when you listen to the musical version.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I know a little cupboard,

With a teeny tiny key,

And there's a jar of lollipops

For me, me, me.

 

It has a little shelf, my dear,

As dark as dark can be,

And there's a dish of Banbury Cakes

For me, me, me.

 

I have a small fat grandmamma,

With a very slippery knee,

And she's the Keeper of the Cupboard

With the key, key, key.

 

And if I'm very good, my dear,

As good as good can be,

There's Banbury Cakes, and lollipops

For me, me, me.


 

 

Inchworm O

 

 


A song written by Frank Loesser. The verse works well with the chorus when sung in counterpoint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Inchworm, Inchworm,

Measuring the marigolds,

You and your arithmetic

Will probably go far.

Inchworm, Inchworm,

Measuring the marigolds,

Seems to me you'd stop and see

How beautiful they are.

 

Two and two are four,

Four and four are eight,

Eight and eight are sixteen,

Sixteen and sixteen are thirty-two.

Two and two are four,

Four and four are eight,

Eight and eight are sixteen,

Sixteen and sixteen are thirty-two.

 

Inchworm, Inchworm,

Measuring the marigolds,

Seems to me you'd stop and see

How beautiful they are.

 

 


 

Little boy fishin’ O

 

Words and music by Australian born songwriter William (Bill) Lovelock in 1952. He wrote this for Shirley Abicair from Adelaide who emigrated to London, England in 1953 and became well known singing folk songs on BBC TV.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Little boy fishin’ off a wooden pier,

“Come fish, bite fish, swim along here.”

Little boy wonder why the fish don't float,

Little boy wanta buy a fishin’ boat.

 

Little boy fishin’ off a wooden pier,

“Come fish, bite fish, swim along here.”

Little boy gotta buy a boat some way,

Then he go fishin’ all the live long day.

 

Chorus

“Dog fish, cat fish, any this or that fish,

Please swim by my line,

Can't catch shell fish, but I want to sell fish,

Gotta make some money for that boat of mine.”

 

Little boy dreaming with a secret smile,

Some day sail away, Cannibal Isle,

Little boy wonder when his boat will come,

Little boy slumber now the day is done.

Chorus

 

Little boy fishin’ off a wooden pier,

“Come fish, bite fish, swim along here.”

Little boy sleepy and he sail away,

In his dreamboat down to Blanket Bay.

 


 

Little white duck O

 

Written around 1950 by W. Barrows and B. Zaritzky. It was made popular by both Burl Ives and Danny Kaye.

A good introduction to colour and also the realities of life!

This is a wonderful song for younger children to listen to and they will find it fun to join in with the pond life noises at the end of each verse..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There’s a little white duck sitting in the water,

A little white duck doing what he oughter.

He took a bite of a lily pad,

Flapped his wings and he said, ‘I’m glad

I’m a little white duck sitting in the water,

Quack! Quack! Quack!

 

There’s a little green frog swimming in the water,

A little green frog doing what he oughter.

He jumped right off of the lily pad,

That the little duck bit and he said, ‘I’m glad

I’m a little green frog swimming in the water,

Glug! Glug! Glug!

 

There’s a little black bug floating on the water,

A little black bug doing what he oughter.

He tickled the frog on the lily pad,

That the little duck bit and he said, ‘I’m glad

I’m a little black bug floating on the water,

Buzz! Buzz! Buzz!

 

There’s a little red snake playing on the water,

A little red snake doing what he oughter.

He frightened the duck and the frog so bad,

He ate the bug and he said, ‘I’m glad

I’m a little red snake playing on the water,

Hiss! Hiss! Hiss!

 

Now there’s nobody left sitting in the water,

Nobody left doing what he oughter.

There’s nothing left but the lily pad,

The duck and the frog ran away, it’s sad

‘Cause there’s nobody left sitting in the water,

Boo! Hoo! Hoo!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Mairzy doats and dozy doats O

 

 


This song was often on the record player or the radio when I was a child in the 50s and thought the nonsense words were wonderful without any understanding of their jumbled nature.

Written in 1943 by Milton Drake, Al Hoffman and Jerry Livingston; the song was inspired by one of the composer’s daughter coming home with this ditty:  Cowzy tweet and sowzy tweet and liddle sharksy doisters’ ‘Cows eat wheat and sows eat wheat and little sharks eat oysters’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mairzy doats and dozy doats and liddle lamzy divey,

A kiddley divey too, wouldn’t you?

Mairzy doats and dozy doats and liddle lamzy divey,

A kiddley divey too, wouldn’t you?

If the words sound weird and funny to your ear,

A little bit jumbled and jivey,

Sing "Mares eat oats and does eat oats

And little lambs eat ivy."

Oh! Mairzy doats and dozy doats and liddle lamzy divey,

A kiddley divey too, wouldn't you-ou?

A kiddley divey too, wouldn't you?


 

 

My grandfather’s clock O

 

 


Written by Henry Clay Work in 1876. You can find the words of the full version at : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Grandfather's_Clock

Our 16 month old grandson has a passion for our grandfather clock and demands over and over again that grandad make it chime ; as soon as he steps foot in our house he runs through the hall to the clock. So this is for him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My grandfather's clock was too large for the shelf,

So it stood ninety years on the floor;

It was taller by half than the old man himself,

Though it weighed not a pennyweight more.

It was bought on the morn of the day that he was born,

And was always his treasure and pride;

But it stopped short, never to go again,

When the old man died.

Chorus

Ninety years without slumbering,

tick, tock, tick, tock,

His life's seconds numbering,

tick, tock, tick, tock,

But it stopped short, never to go again,

When the old man died.

 

My grandfather said that of those he could hire,

Not a servant so faithful he found;

For it wasted no time, and had but one desire,

At the close of each week to be wound.

And it kept in its place, not a frown upon its face,

And its hands never hung by its side.

But it stopped, short, never to go again,

When the old man died.

 


 

Oh, Susanna 🔊

 

 


We loved songs from the American tradition when we were young and this one by Stephen Foster (1826–1864) and first published in 1848 was a particular favourite.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, I come from Alabama with a banjo on my knee,

I am goin’ to Lou’siana, my true love for to see.

Oh Susanna! Don’t you cry for me!

For I come from Alabama with a banjo on my knee.

 

It rained all night the day I left, the weather it was dry,

The sun so hot I froze to death, Susanna don’t you cry.

Oh Susanna! Don’t you cry for me!

For I come from Alabama with a banjo on my knee.

 

Now I had a dream the other night, when everything was still;

I thought I saw Susanna dear, a-comin’ down the hill.

A buckwheat cake was in her mouth, a tear was in her eye;

Says I, I’m coming from the south, Susanna don’t you cry.

 

Oh Susanna! Don’t you cry for me!

For I come from Alabama with a banjo on my knee,

Oh Susanna! Don’t you cry for me!

For I come from Alabama with a banjo on my knee.

 


 

One potato, two potato O

 

Younger children will enjoy listening to the verses  and joining in with the chorus.

 

Mime simple actions during each verse.

For the chorus curl hands into fists and place one on top of  the other. Remove the bottom fist and place it above the other in time to the music. Keep repeating this action as each time the fists get higher.

Children find this activity great fun!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


In my little garden, now promise you won’t laugh,

I haven’t any flowers and I haven’t any grass,

But now I’m going to dig and plant

And soon I’ll have a show;

With a bit of sun and a bit of rain

There’ll be a lovely row of:

 

Chorus

One potato, two potato, three potato, four,

Five potato, six potato, seven potato more.

One potato, two potato, three potato, four,

Five potato, six potato, seven potato more.

 

I’m going to grow so many things, I’ll surely never starve,

Cabbages and cauliflowers,

I won’t do things by halves,

I’ll plant a row of runner beans,

They’ll grow so very high,

With a bit of sun and a bit of rain,

They’ll reach up to the sky.

Chorus

 

So if you’re ever down my way, do drop in for tea.

We’ll have lettuces and radishes, they’ll all be grown by me,

Tomatoes too, and cucumbers,

Oh what a lovely spread!

And if you do not like that,

You can always have instead:

Chorus

 

 

 


 

Run rabbit, run rabbit O

 

Written by Noel Gay and Ralph Butler this song was very popular in World War 2. Flanagan and Alan’s version poked fun at the Germans and was a great favourite of Churchill. Find out more at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Run_Rabbit_Run

It was certainly still very popular when I was a child, we listened to it on the radio and sang it in the street and the school playground.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


On the farm, ev'ry Friday,

On the farm, it's rabbit pie day,

So ev'ry Friday, that ever comes along,

I get up early and sing this little song...

 

Chorus

Run, rabbit, run, rabbit, run, run, run!

Run, rabbit, run, rabbit, run, run, run!

Bang, bang, bang, bang!

Goes the farmer's gun.

So run, rabbit, run, rabbit, run, run, run!

 

Run, rabbit, run, rabbit, run, run, run!

Don't give the farmer his fun, fun, fun.

He'll get by without his rabbit pie,

So run, rabbit, run, rabbit, run, run, run!

 

On the farm, no poor rabbit,

Comes to harm because I grab it.

They jump and frolic whenever I go by,

They know I help them to dodge the rabbit pie!

Chorus


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