Lavender Lane A-H

Vintage favourites

 

A windmill in old Amsterdam

Aiken Drum

Babes in the woods

Daisy, Daisy /She was one of the early worms

Dashing away with the smoothing iron

Donkey riding

Down in Demerara

English country garden

How much is that doggie in the window?

 

Last updated: 4/30/2017 3:06 PM

 

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To listen to music from these songs click on O

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

 

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A windmill in old Amsterdam O

 

Words and music by Ted Dicks and Myles. Rudge.

A very familiar song from my childhood as sung by Ronnie Hilton  on Uncle Mac’s BBC radio ‘Children’s favourites’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A mouse lived in a windmill in old Amsterdam.

A windmill with a mouse in and he wasn't grousing.

He sang every morning, "How lucky I am,

Living in a windmill in old Amsterdam!"

Chorus:

I saw a mouse! Where?

There on a stair! Where on a stair? Right there!

A little mouse with clogs on, Well I declare!

Going clip-clippety-clop on the stair. Oh yeah.

Going clip-clippety-clop on the stair.

 

This mouse he got lonesome, he took him a wife;

A windmill with mice in, it's hardly surprising

She sang every morning, "How lucky I am,

Living in a windmill in old Amsterdam!"

Chorus

First they had triplets and then they had quins,

A windmill with quins in, and triplets and twins in.

They sang every morning, "How lucky we are

Living in a windmill in Amsterdam, ya!"

Chorus

 

 


 

Aiken Drum O

 

I remember the chorus of this nonsense song being sung with great enthusiasm. in my Junior school class in the 1950s.

With its simple rousing refrain it will appeal to those who are less confident singers.

 

Try playing on other ‘instruments’  paper bag, elastic band, frying pan, leg of a chair – anything to hand!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There was a man lived in the moon,

Lived in the moon, lived in the moon.

There was a man lived in the moon,

And his name was Aiken Drum.

 

And he played upon a ladle, a ladle, a ladle,

And he played upon a ladle,

And his name was Aiken Drum.

 

His hat was made of good cream cheese,

Good cream cheese, good cream cheese,

His hat was made of good cream cheese,

And his name was Aiken Drum.

 

His coat was made of good roast beef,

Good roast beef, good roast beef,

His coat was made of good roast beef,

And his name was Aiken Drum.

 

His buttons were made of penny loaves,

Penny loaves, penny loaves,

His buttons were made of penny loaves,

And his name was Aiken Drum.

 

His waistcoat was made of crusts of pies,

Crusts of pies, crusts of pies,

His waistcoat was made of crusts of pies,

And his name was Aiken Drum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Babes in the wood O

 

 


There are many versions of this song ; one of the most well known is by the Copper family. It is also well known in the U.S.A.

Find out more at : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babes_in_the_Wood

This version is a bit of a hotchpotch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My dears, don’t you know, ‘twas a long time ago,

Two little children whose names I don't know,

Were stolen away on a bright summer's day,

And left in the woods so I've heard people say.

 

Chorus

Poor babes in the woods, poor babes in the woods!

Oh don't you remember those babes in the woods?

 

And when it was night, so sad was their plight,

The sun it went down and the moon gave no light,

They sobbed and they sighed and they bitterly cried,

Those poor little children, they laid down and died.

Chorus

 

And when they were dead, the robins so red,

Brought strawberry leaves and over them spread,

And all the day long on the branches they thronged,

They mournfully whistled and sang this sweet song:

Chorus

 

 


 


 

Daisy BellO

+ She was a sweet little dicky bird

 

 


Both of these songs  were popular in the Victorian Music Hall. ‘Daisy Bell’ was written by Harry Dacre in 1892, ‘She was a sweet little dicky bird’  was by T.W. Conner and popularized by George Beauchamp.

These are two separate songs but as a child I always heard them sung one following the other. The verses of both songs would have been tricky for children.

Move gently from side to side in time to the music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Daisy, Daisy,

Give me your answer do!

I’m half crazy,

All for the love of you.

It won’t be a stylish marriage,

I can’t afford a carriage,

But you’ll look sweet, upon a seat,

Of a bicycle made for two.

 

She was a sweet little dicky bird,

‘Tweet, tweet, tweet!’ she went.

Softly she sang to me,

‘Til all my money was spent.

Then she went off song,

We parted on fighting terms.

She was one of the early birds,

And I was one of the worms.

 


 

Dashing away with a smoothing iron O

 

Learn the days of the week while dramatising cleaning activities.

I sang this song at school in the 1950s. This is the order of laundry tasks as I remember them but you can find different sequences on the internet. I certainly remember my grandmother starching my grandfather’s collars but think she subsequently hung them on the line.

This song was collected in Somerset by Cecil Sharp.

 

Dramatise the actions vigorously !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


'Twas on a Monday morning,

When I beheld my darling,

She looked so neat and charming,

In every high degree;

She looked so neat and nimble, O,

A-washing of her of her linen, O,

Dashing away with the smoothing iron,

Dashing away with the smoothing iron,

Dashing away with the smoothing iron,

She stole my heart away.

 

Tuesday / A-hanging out her linen, O…

Wednesday / A-starching of her linen, O…

Thursday / A-ironing of her linen, O…

Friday / A-folding of her linen, O…

Saturday / A-airing of her linen, O…

Sunday / A-wearing of her linen, O…


 

 

Donkey riding O

 

 


A classic in singing sessions in the 1950s classroom where the chorus was always sung with great gusto.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Were you ever in Quebec,

Stowing timber on the deck,

Where there’s a king with a golden crown,

Riding on a donkey?

 

Chorus

Hey, ho! Away we go,

Donkey riding, donkey riding,

Hey, ho! Away we go,

Riding on a donkey.

 

Were you ever off Cape Horn,

Where it’s always nice and warm,

Seen the lion and the unicorn,

Riding on a donkey?

 

Were you ever in Cardiff Bay,

Where the folks all shout ‘Hooray!

Here comes John with his three month’s pay,

Riding on a donkey.’

 


 

 

Down in Demerara O

 

This version comes from a BBC radio’s Singing Together Autumn 1963 booklet (I think as I only have two pages!). But I do remember well singing it at Junior school in the 1950s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a man who had a horselum,

Had a horselum, had a horselum,

There was a man who had a horselum,

Down in Demerara.

Chorus

And here we sit like birds in the wilderness,

Birds in the wilderness, birds in the wilderness

Here we sit like birds in the wilderness,

Down in Demerara.

 

Now that poor horse it fell a sickelum...

 

And that poor man he sent for a doctorum...

 

But that poor horse, it went and diedalum...

 

And here we sit and flap our wingsalum...

 

 


 

English country garden O

 

Originally this was a Morris dancing tune collected by Cecil Sharp in 1907 as the ‘Hankerchief dance’.

The version below is a half remembered version from those I have heard over the years – I did however add the blackbird whose song I have always loved.

I would also have loved to have added a verse about the foxes, badgers and slow worms that visit our Devon garden regularly and in Oxfordshire the muntjack deer.

My sister in Perth Australia has seen kangaroos and other Antipodian creatures in her garden – maybe there is another song there!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


How many kinds of sweet flowers grow in an English country garden?

I'll tell you now of some that I know, and those I miss you'll surely pardon,

Daffodils, hearts-ease and flocks, meadow sweet and lilies, stocks,

Gentian, lupins and tall hollyhocks,

Roses, fox-gloves, snowdrops, blue forget-me-nots, in an English country garden.

 

How many insects here come and go in an English country garden?

I'll tell you now of some that I know, and those I miss you'll surely pardon,

Dragonflies, moths, bumble bees, spiders falling from the trees,

Butterflies that sway in the mild gentle breeze,

There are hedgehogs that roam and little garden gnomes, in an English country garden.

 

How many songbirds fly to and fro in an English country garden?

I'll tell you now of some that I know, and those I miss you'll surely pardon,

Blackbirds, coo-cooing doves, robins and the warbling thrush,

Blue birds, lark, finch and nightingale,

There is joy in the spring when the birds begin to sing, in an English country garden.

 

 


 

How much is that doggie in the window? O

 

 


We all sang along with this song in the 1950s but not with this simpler version for young children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chorus

How much is that doggie in the window?

The one with the waggley tail.

How much is that doggie in the window?

I do hope that doggie's for sale.

 

I don't want a bunny or a kitty,

I don't want a parrot that talks.

I don't want a bowl of little fishes,

You can't take a fish for a walk.

Chorus

 

I’ve saved up to buy that little doggie,

I’ll make sure he has a good home.

For I’ll wash, groom and give him lots of walkies,

And feed him a big juicy bone.

Chorus

 

 

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