Lullabies S - T

Sing a song at twilight

Sleep, little seed

Sleep, O sleep!

Softly, softly rock

Star light, star bright

Stars of the summer night

Stars shining

Suliram

Sweet and low

Tell me why

That’s an Irish lullaby

The dream fairy

The little sandman

The little white boat / Half moon

The moon’s song

The nesting hour / Bed-time

The night will never stay

The Starlighter

The stars are hiding all the day

The white hen’s cradle song

Three white gulls

Time for man go home

Turn around

Twinkle, twinkle, little star

 

Also see:

Maranoa lullaby an Aboriginal song

Last updated: 10/9/2018 5:00 PM

The songs below are compiled, illustrated and sometimes adapted by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

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Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

Sing a song at twilight 🔊

 

 


‘Just a song of twilight’ or Love’s own sweet song’ was written by J. L. Molloy 1884. The words here were adapted by Albert E. Wier in his wonderful anthology ‘Songs children love to sing’ published in 1916.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sing a song at twilight, when the lights are low;

And the flickering shadows, softly come and go,

Whipporwill’s a singing, robin’s in his nest.

May our song at twilight lull you to rest,

Lull you to sweet rest.


 

 

Sleep, little seed 🔊

 

 


A gentle song for the beginning of Spring.

Words and music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sleep, little seed, when the wild winds blow;

Sleep, little seed, through the frost and snow;

Sleep, little seed, till the sun shines warm

Then rise little seed to greet the new dawn.

You may be a flower, you may be a tree,

You may be a pumpkin or a child just like me;

So sleep, little seed for as long as you may

To rise up and reach for the blue sky some day.


 

 

 

Sleep, O sleep! 🔊

 

 


From ‘Mother’s Nursery Songs’ written by Thomas Hastings and published in 1848; most of these songs are of their time when childhood deaths were common, as was the talk of the poor heathen child in other lands. They were written with the purpose of instilling good behaviour in the young child and were accompamied by a strong religious and moral fervour. This one, however, is quite wonderful and has just had minor adaptations made to the words.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sleep, O sleep!

While breezes so softly are blowing;

Sleep, O sleep! 

While streamlets so gently are flowing.

Sleep, O sleep! Sleep, O sleep!

 

Sleep, O sleep!

While flocks in the meadows are straying,

Sleep, O sleep!

While lambkins are merrily playing,

Sleep, O sleep! Sleep, O sleep!

 

Sleep, O sleep!

While birds in the forests are singing,

Sleep, O sleep!

While echoes of music are ringing,

Sleep, O sleep! Sleep, O sleep!

 

Sleep, O sleep! 

While angels are watching beside thee,

Sleep, O sleep!

May blessings forever betide thee,

Sleep, O sleep! Sleep, O sleep!

.


 

 

 

Softly, softly rock O

 

This lovely Austrian Christmas lullaby ‘Still, still, still, weil's Kindlein schlafen will’ is loosely translated by Helen Henschel in ‘A third sixty songs for little children’; It does not appear to be a familiar one but I have used it for Nativity plays throughout my teaching life. I have adapted two further verses as sung by Trinity Church in Boston, hopefully in the same tradition.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Softly, softly, rock my baby fast asleep.

The little stars look down from heaven,

Angels through the window peep,

So softly, softly rock my baby fast asleep.

 

Hush, hush, hush, hear the gently falling snow,

For all is quiet, the world is sleeping,

Stars above thy vigil keeping,

Hush, hush, hush, hear the gently falling snow,

 

Dream, dream, dream, my dearest little one.

While stars a-twinkling without number,

Watch you as you sweetly slumber,

Dream, dream, dream, my dearest little one.


 

Star light, star bright O

 

Wishing when we see a shooting or falling star is a lovely tradition, possibly one from ancient times, to pass on to our children. It is also a custom to wish as the first star of the evening appears.

This nursery rhyme has the Roud number #16339.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Star light, star bright,

First star I see tonight;

Wish I may, wish I might,

Have the wish I wish tonight.

 


 

 

Stars of the summer night 🔊

 

 


Words by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, music by Isaac Baker Woodbury.

A poem for a lady and lover but with one word changed makes a beautiful lullaby. It can easily be modified for a baby boy  with ‘laddie’or just ‘baby’ and ‘he/him’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Stars of the summer night,

Far in yon azure deep,

Hide, hide your golden light,

She sleeps, my lady sleeps.

She sleeps, she sleeps, my lady sleeps.

 

Moon of the summer night,

Far down yon western steeps

Sink, sink in silver light,

She sleeps, my lady sleeps.

She sleeps, she sleeps, my lady sleeps.

 

Wind of the summer night,

Where yonder woodbine creeps,

Fold, fold thy pinnions light,

She sleeps, my lady sleeps.

She sleeps, she sleeps, my lady sleeps.

 

Dreams of the summer night,

Tell her, her mother keeps,

Watch while in slumber light,

She sleeps, my lady sleeps.

She sleeps, she sleeps, my lady sleeps.


 

 

 

Stars shining O

 

A lullaby from Texas.

Ruth Crawford Seeger in ‘American Folk songs for children’ suggests counting other objects such as buttons and children.

 

For the words below open and close fists to show twinkling stars. Indicate numbers with fingers. Throw hands forward for ‘Good Lawd’ Move open hands from side to side for ‘by’m bye’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


By’m bye, by’m bye,

Stars shining, number number one,

Number two, number three,

Good Lawd, by’m bye, by’m bye, by’m bye,

Good Lawd, by’m bye.

 

By’m bye, by’m bye,

Stars shining, number number four,

Number five, number six,

Good Lawd, by’m bye, by’m bye, by’m bye,

Good Lawd, by’m bye.

 

By’m bye, by’m bye,

Stars shining, number number seven,

Number eight, number nine, number ten,

Good Lawd, by’m bye, by’m bye, by’m bye,

Good Lawd, by’m bye.

 

 

 


 

 

Suliram 🔊

 

 


An Indonesian folk song. Pete Seeger felt this song needed no translation but I rather liked the one below written by Marc Merson which can be found in Tony Saleton’s book ‘Singing down the road’ published in 1977.

Find more at: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=33967

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Suliram, suliram, ram, ram,

Suliram, yang manis,

Adu hai indung suh oorang.

Bidjakla sana dipandang manis.

 

Tingi la, tingi, si mataha ri, Suliram,

Anakla koorbau mati toortambat, Suliram,

Sudala lama saiya menchari.

Baruse klarung sa ya mendabat.

 

Suliram, suliram, ram, ram,

Suliram, rest now, my child,

As the earth awaits the cooling shower,

So sleep is waiting for you, my little flower. / my little one.

 

Shadows are tempting, they want you to play, Suliram,

Whispering, “Come with us, come far away.”Suliram,

But shadows fly off beyond the furthest sea,

And when you waken, you’ll still be here with me.

 

La suliram, suliram, ram, ram.

Suliram yang manis,

Adu hai indung suh oorang.

Bidjakla sana dipandang manis.


 

 

Sweet and low 🔊

 

 


A lullaby by Lord Alfred Tennyson, music by Joseph Barnby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sweet and low, sweet and low,

Wind of the western sea,

Low, low, breathe and blow,

Wind of the western sea!

Over the rolling waters go,

Come from the dying moon, and blow,

Blow him again to me;

While my little one, while my pretty one, sleeps.

 

Sleep and rest, sleep and rest,

Father will come to thee soon;

Rest, rest, on mother's breast,

Father will come to thee soon;

Father will come to his babe in the nest,

Silver sails all out of the west

Under the silver moon:

Sleep, my little one, sleep, my pretty one, sleep.


 

 

 

Tell me why O

 

 


A traditional song with a sense of wonder that works so well as a lullaby. The words inspired me to write two further verses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tell me why the stars do shine,

Tell me why the ivy twines,

Tell me why the skies are blue,

And I will tell you just why I love you!

 

I don’t know why the stars do shine,

I don’t know why the ivy twines,

I don’t know why the skies are blue,

One thing I do know is that I love you!

 

Tell me where the stars do shine,

Tell me where the ivy twines,

Tell me where the skies are blue,

And I will tell you just where I love you!

 

Way up high the stars do shine,

Round the old oak tree the ivy twines,

Above the clouds the skies are blue,

Asleep in my arms is where I love you!

 


 

 

That’s an Irish lullaby O

 

 


A song from Ireland written by J.R. Shannon. My grandmother who had Irish parents sang this song to me when I was a young child.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Over in Killarney,

Many years ago,

My mother sang a song to me

In tones so sweet and low.

 

Just a simple little ditty,

In her good old Irish way,

And I'd give the world if she could sing

That song of hers today.

 

Too-ra-loo-ra-loo ra,

Too-ra-loo-ra-li,

Too-ra-loo-ra-loo ra,

Hush, now don't you cry!

 

Too-ra-loo-ra-loo ra,

Too-ra-loo-ra-li,

Too-ra-loo-ra-loo ra,

That's an Irish lullaby.

 


 

 

The dream fairy 🔊

 

 


Written by Thomas Hood. I believe there might be yet more verses for naughty children under the title ‘Queen Mab’ but the words below can be found in the classic poetry tome ‘The Book of 1,000 poems’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A little fairy comes at night,

Her eyes are blue, her hair is brown

With silver spots upon her wings,

And from the moon she flutters down.

 

She has a little silver wand,

And when a good child goes to bed

She waves her wand from right to left

And makes a circle round her head,

 

And then it dreams of pleasant things,

Of fountains filled with fairy fish,

And trees that bear delicious fruit,

And bow their branches at a wish;

 

Of arbours filled with dainty scents

From lovely flowers that never fade,

Bright ‘flies that flitter in the sun,

And glow-worms shining in the shade;

 

And talking birds with gifted tongues

For singing songs and telling tales,

And pretty dwarfs to show the way

Through the fairy hills and fairy dales.


 

 

 

The little sandman / Brahm’s lullaby 🔊

 

 


Johannes Brahms wrote this lullaby, "Wiegenlied", Op. 49, No. 4 and published in 1868, to celebrate the birth of a son to his friend Bertha Faber. It was based on a German folk tune and was Brahms's last song.There are many different translations of the words. These words are mainly the verses written in Foresman’s ‘A child’s book of songs’ published in 1928 but have been adapted by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There’s magic in the moonbeam

That kissed the flowers goodnight,

For now the red red rosebuds

Are pale as lilies white;

The pine trees still are whispering,

The cricket rings its bell,

All for you, all for you,

To make you slumber well!

 

The birds you heard this morning

Have long since gone to rest;

And now are close together

Against their mother's breast.

And there they lie so still and warm,

Secure from every harm.

Slumber, slumber,

My darling baby dear.

 

I see a friendly elf man,

He holds a bag of sand;

He bought it from the fairies,

In their enchanted land;

And on your drowsy eyelids

Some golden grains he’ll strew;

That, you know, that you know.

Will make your dreams come true!


 

 

 

The little white boat  🔊

 

 


‘The little white boat’ or 반달 ‘Half moon’ has lyrics and music by Yin Kerong, a Korean composer (1903 - 1988) who wrote other songs for children. It has also been translated into Chinese 小白船 and Japanese. Find out more about Yin Kerong and the Korean lyrics at: http://et97.com/view/2481305.htm .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


See the small white boat in the sky,

Sailing t’wards the west,

High above a cinnamon tree,

Where white rabbit rests.

With no sail nor oars it skims

O’er the Milky Way,

Floating among the clouds,

It slowly just fades away.

 

Through the silver galaxy sail,

Through a rainbow land

Of clouds that billow high in the sky,

Where will it go then?

Onwards to a far off place

Where shines a golden light,

The dawn star, a guiding light,

It shines, how it shines so bright.


 

 

 

The moon’s song O

 

 


These lovely words were written or translated from German ‘Das lied von mond’ by Frances B. Wood in ‘Sixty songs for little children’ OUP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


When day has gone and darkness

Comes sweeping o’er the sky,

I leave my cloudy palace

To swing my lamp on high.

 

And all my dear star children

Their little lanterns light,

And twinkles down to tell you

We’re watching through the night.

 


 

 

The nesting hour  🔊

 

 


Or ‘Bed-time’ written by Laurence Alma Tadema.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Robin friend has gone to bed,

Little wing to hide his head;

Mother’s bird must slumber too,

Just as baby robins do.

When the stars begin to rise,

Birds and babies close their eyes.


 

 

 

The night will never stay 🔊

 

 


Written by the wonderful children’s poet Eleanor Farjeon 1881-1965. One of my favourite poets and so many of her poems are suitable for younger children.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The night will never stay,

The night will still go by,

Though with a million stars

You pin it to the sky;

Though you bind it with the blowing wind

And buckle it with the moon,

The night will slip away

Like sorrow or a tune.


 

 

 

The Starlighter 🔊

 

 


Words to this haunting poem are by Arthur Guiterman 1871 – 1943 an American poet; find out more at:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Guiterman.

Music and arrangement by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


When the bat's on the wing and the bird's in the tree,

Comes the old Starlighter, whom none may see.

First in the West, where the low hills are,

He touches his wand to the evening star.

Then swiftly he runs on his rounds on high,

Till he's lit every lamp in the dark blue sky.


 

 

The stars are hiding 🔊

 

 


A lovely little song by Malvina Reynold. I came across it on Marty Lane’s delightful CD ‘Brighten the day’ where she sings it as a medley.

 

Verse 1. Line 1.-3. Open and close hands and then pull to chest. x3. 4. Draw a large circle with hands and wiggle fingers outwards. 5.-6. As before.

Verse 2. Line 1.-3. Open and close hands and then put hands to cheek. x3. 4. Draw a large circle with hands and wiggle fingers behind back. 5.-6. As before.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The stars are hiding all the day,

The stars are hiding all the day,

The stars are hiding all the day,

The sun is shining them away.

Orion and the Lion,

They are hiding all the day.

 

The stars are shining all the night,

The stars are shining all the night,

The stars are shining all the night,

The sun is shining out of sight.

Orion and the Lion,

They are shining all the night.


 

 

The white hen’s cradle song 🔊

 

 


Written by Frances B. Wood to a Belgian folk tune. It can be found in ‘A second sixty songs for little children’ published in 1945. This series of books were common in the classroom when I first started teaching.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hear the white hen calling,

In the farmyard calling.

“Cluck, cluck, cluck,

Little chickens run

Underneath my wings each one,

Cheep! Cheep! Close every eye now,

Cheep! Cheep! Cosy you lie.”


 

 

Three white gulls O

 

This gentle and rather beautiful lullaby is supposedly of Italian origin but I have been unable to find the Italian equivalent. Do let me know if you find the source material.

 

It makes a lovely calming down song as children swoop and soar moving their arms and then finally sink down and sleep.

 

Make fingers flash on and off to mimic starlight and mime other parts of the songs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There were three white gulls a-flying,

There were three white gulls a-flying,

There were three white gulls a-flying,

And they soared through the sky,

They soared through the sky,

They soared through the sky.

 

In the waves they dipped their soft wings,

In the waves they dipped their soft wings,

In the waves they dipped their soft wings,

And they soared through the sky...

 

In the clouds they danced and tumbled...

 

 


 

 

 

Time for man go home 🔊

 

 


This song from Trinidad is usually regarded as a chanty or work song, it is also popular at community events to sing when it is time to leave; here it is sung as a gentle going to bed lullaby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Time for man go home,

Time for man go home.

Time for man go home,

It’s time for man and it’s time for beast,

Time for man go home.

The bird in bush go kwa, kwa, kwa,

Time for man go home,

Time for man go home,

 

Time for man go home,

Time for man go home.

Time for man go home,

Time for man go home.

It's time to go and it's time for bed,

Time for man go home.

It's time to go and the sun go down,

Time for man go home,

Time for man go home.

 


 

 

Turn around 🔊

 

 


One of the many wonderful songs from the pen of Malvina Reynolds This was written with Harry Belafonte and Alan Greene.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Where are you going, my little one, little one,

Where are you going, my baby, my own?

Turn around and you're two,

Turn around and you're four,

Turn around and you're a young girl going out of my door.

Turn around, turn around,

Turn around and you're a young girl going out of my door.

 

Where are you going, my little one, little one,

Little pigtails and petticoats, where have you gone?

Turn around and you're tiny,

Turn around and you're grown,

Turn around and you're a young wife with babes of your own.

Turn around, turn around,

Turn around and you're a young wife with babes of your own.

 

Where are you going, my little one, little one,

Where are you going, my baby, my own?


 

 

 

Twinkle, twinkle, little star O

 

 


A tune that is so very familiar and used in many other nursery songs. The tune came from the French song Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman’ published in 1761. You can find this song at:

 

Make fingers flash on and off to mimic starlight and mime other parts of the songs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Twinkle, twinkle, little star,

How I wonder what you are.

Up above the world so high,

Like a diamond in the sky.

Twinkle, twinkle, little star,

How I wonder what you are.

 

When the blazing sun has gone,

When he nothing shines upon.

Then you show your little light,

Twinkle, twinkle, all the night.

Twinkle, twinkle...

 

Then the traveller in the dark,

Thanks you for your tiny spark.

He could not see where to go,

If you did not twinkle so.

Twinkle, twinkle...

 

In the dark blue sky you keep,

And often through my windows peep,

For you never shut your eye,

‘Til the sun is in the sky.

Twinkle, twinkle...

 

 

 


 

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