Lullabies N-R

Nature’s goodnight

Nature’s lullaby

Night is here

Norwegian cradle song

Now the day is over

O ladybird

Oh, Mother how pretty the moon looks tonight

Only the moon man knows

Oro, my little boat

Over the river to Charlie

Raisins and almonds

Rock gently sailboat

Rock me easy, rock me slow

Rockaby, lullaby

Rock-a-bye baby

Rock-a-bye you

Rockin’ by the baby

Last updated: 10/30/2018 2:45 PM

The songs below are compiled, illustrated and sometimes adapted by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on O

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

Nature’s good night 🔊

 

 


A lullaby written by Patty Smith Hill, 1868–1946. From ‘Song stories for the kindergarten’ published 1893.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Clouds of grey are in the sky,

Flocks of birds are winging by,

Trees now dressed in faded brown,

Send their leaves all rustling down,

Little flow’rs in slumber deep,

Nod their drowsy heads and sleep…

All the world must say “Goodnight”

'Till Spring comes back with sunshine bright.


 

 

Nature’s lullaby 🔊

 

 


A lullaby written by Richard Compton to a Scottish folk tune. It can be found in ‘140 Folk-songs’ from the Concord Series published in 1921. The third verse is from elsewhere. Music arranged by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hush-a-bye, baby,

The night winds are sighing,

Go to sleep, go to sleep,

Crickets are crying;

Sleep 'til the dew

On the grass lies a-winking,

Sleep 'til the morning sun

Wakens you blinking.

 

Warm in their woolly folds,

Lambkins are resting,

Soft in their swaying beds,

Wee birds are nesting;

All the dark night,

In your cradle lie dreaming,

'Til the broad sun

Through the window comes streaming.

 

Off in the distance,

A hoot owl is calling,

Into sweet dreams,

Little babes should be falling;

Hush-a-bye, baby,

It's time you were sleeping,

'Til bright rays of sunlight

At morning come creeping.


 

 

Night is here 🔊

 

 


A Cherokee lullaby. Never fear, the night sky and mother are nearby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Night is here, ay a ha,

Stars appear, ay a ha,

Mama-ma, aya a ha,

 

Owls you hear, ay a ha,

Do not fear, ay a ha,

Mama-ma, aya a ha,

 

Close your eyes, ay a ha,

Go to sleep, aya a ha,

Mama-ma, aya a ha.


 

 

 

Norwegian cradle song 🔊

 

 


The lullaby "Na ska' en liten fa sova sa søtt" comes from Romerike, a flat landscape in the south of Norway. Because of the wide plain there is a lot of agriculture to be found there. This gentle melody is in a minor key and rises and falls with a swaying rhythm to create a calming quiet atmosphere. Translated by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dear little one you must sleep, must sleep,

The cradle lies there my sweet baby.

There it waits ready, so cosy and soft,

Now you can slumber in safety.

Hush, hush, sweetly you’ll sleep,

For angels watch over my baby.

 


 

 

 

Now the day is over 🔊

 

 


This hymn was written by  Sabine Baring-Gould, 1834-1924; the words here have been adapted for a young and secular audience by Dany Rosevear who also added the chords. The original tune was composed by Joseph Barnby 1868 and has been simply arranged by Alec Wilder for ‘Lullabies and Night songs’ 1965. Sing softly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Now the day is over,

Night is drawing nigh;

Shadows of the evening

Steal across the sky.

 

Now the darkness gathers,

Stars begin to peep,

Birds and beasts and flowers

Soon will be asleep.

 

Give to little children

Dreams so sweet and free;

Guard the sailors tossing

On the deep, blue sea.

 

When the morning wakens,

Then may I arise,

To greet the new day dawning

With eager, loving eyes.


 

 

O ladybird 🔊

 

 


From ‘Dulce Domun Rhymes and songs for children’ published 1893.

Dany Rosevear wrote the music as the original tune is in 3/8 and challenging, for me, to sing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


O ladybird, ladybird, fly away home!

The squirrel and fieldmouse have gone to their nest;

The daisies have shut up their sleepy red eyes,

The bees and the insects and birds are at rest.

 

O ladybird, ladybird, fly away home!

The glow-worm is lighting his glittering lamp,

The dew’s falling fast and your fine speckled wing

Will be moistened and wet with the close clinging damp.

 

O ladybird, ladybird, fly away home!

The sweet little fairy-bells tinkle afar;

Make haste or they’ll catch you and harness you fast

With a gossamer web to Oberon’s car.

 


 

 

 

Oh, Mother how pretty the moon looks tonight 🔊

 

 


Many grandparents and indeed great grandparents were familiar with this beautiful  song in the U.S.A. over the years; some suggest its origins are Irish. Mudcat has investigated its origins and say it is possibly attributed to a poem by Eliza Lee Follen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


"Oh, Mother how pretty the moon looks tonight,

It was never so pretty before;

Its two little horns are so sharp and so bright,

I hope they’ll not grow any more!

 

Chorus:

If I were up there with both you and the moon,

We'd rock in it nightly you'd see.

We’d sit in the middle and hold tight both ends,

Oh, what a fine cradle t'would be.

 

We'd call to the stars to get out of our way,

Lest we should rock over their toes.

And there we would play till the dawn of the day

To see where that pretty moon goes.

 

And there we would play in the beautiful sky,

And through the bright clouds we would roam,

We’d see the sun set and we'd see the sun rise,

And on the next rainbow come home."


 

 

Only the moon man knows 🔊

 

 


The original, much longer,  poem was written by Mildred Plew Merryman (nee Meigs) and published ‘Child’s Life’ in 1923. It also appeared in ‘The golden book of poetry’ published 1945. It has since been put to music and sung by Cathie Taylor, Bonnie Guitar and Kathy Reed Naiman among others; this version probably follows the latter most closely.

Find out more at: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=29363

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Zoon, zoon, cuddle and croon,

Out on the wrinklin’ sea,

The moon man casts a silvery net

Fashioned from moonbeams three.

 

And some say when the net lies long,

And no one else is there,

The moon man fishes for silvery combs

That fell from a mermaid's hair.

 

Oh, the waves roll out and the waves roll in,

And the nodding night wind blows,

But why the moon man fishes the sea

Only the moon man knows.

 

Zoon, zoon, cuddle and croon,

Out on the wrinklin’ sea,

The moon man casts a silvery net

Fashioned from moonbeams three.

 

And some say when the net lies long

And the midnight hour is nigh;

The moon man fishes for some old song

That fell from a sailor's pipe.

 

And some say he fishes the seas,

Down where the wrecked ships lie;

Looking for lost little baby stars,

That slid from the velvet sky.

 

Oh, the waves roll out and the waves roll in

And the gray gulls dip and doze,

But why the moon man fishes the sea,

Only the moon man knows.

 

Zoon, zoon, cuddle and croon,

Out on the wrinklin’ sea,

The moon man casts a silvery net

Fashioned from moonbeams three.

 

And some say when the great net gleams,

And the waves are dusky blue,

The moon man fishes for two little dreams

He lost when the world was new.

 

Oh, the waves roll out and the waves roll in,

And the nodding night wind blows,

But why the moon man fishes the sea

Only the moon man knows.


 

 

 

Oro, my little boat O

 

 


A sweet Irish lullaby; hear it exquisitely sung by Pauline Scanlon and Éilís Kennedy in the Irish language at: https://songoftheisles.com/2013/02/08/oro-mo-bhaidin/.

The words below are not a literal translation, this version was collected by Diane Hamilton and comes from the LP ‘So early in the morning’ where it was sung by Peg Clancy.

Find out more about this song at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=12006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oro, my little boat that rests in the bay,

Oro ma vardin,

Take up the oars and let us away,

Oro ma vardin.

 

Oro ma curraagh O,

Oro ma vardin,

Oro ma curraagh O,

Oro ma vardin.

 

Sailing the waves over foam-white crests,

Oro ma vardin,

Happy and free away to the west,

Oro ma vardin.

 

Riding the waves on the ocean’s rim,

Oro ma vardin,

Sailing home as the light grows dim,

Oro ma vardin.

 


 

 

 

Over the river to Charlie O

 

A traditional Scottish lullaby from the Highlands of Scotland. Jean Ritchie however remembered her mother dancing to this in the Appalachians.

It is also very similar to the song ‘Weevily wheat’ which I sung at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVNct60BiV8 though the one below is in a minor key.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Charlie's neat and Charlie's sweet,

Charlie he's a dandy,

Charlie he's the very lad,

Who stole my sugar candy.

Chorus

Over the river to feed my sheep,

Over the river to Charlie,

Over the river to feed my sheep,

And measure up my barley.

 

Don’t want your wheat, don’t want your cheat

And I don’t want your barley,

I want some flour and half an hour,

To bake a cake for Charlie.

 

Charlie’s here, Charlie’s there,

Charlie’s over the ocean.

Charlie he'll come back someday,

If he don't change his notion.

 

 

 


 

 

Raisins and almonds O

 

 


A widowed mother rocks her baby son Yidele to sleep; this Yiddish lullaby was written in 1880 by Abraham Goldfaden. The original is a much longer song; you can find out more at:  http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5468 .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


To my little one’s cradle in the night,

Comes a little goat snowy and white,

The goat will trot to the market,

While mother her watch does keep,

To bring you back raisins and almonds,

Sleep, my little one, sleep.

 


 

 

 

Rock gently sailboat O

 

 


Also known as ‘The Israeli boat song’; a lullaby written by Lionel Morton. This song featured on BBC’s Playschool and the classic ‘Bang on a drum’ songs from Play School and Playaway LP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rock gently sailboat in the midday sunshine,

Rock gently sailboat, rock us all to sleep.

Sailors are dreaming, white clouds are streaming,

Warm winds are blowing, from across the sea.

Here in our sailboat, noone can discover us,

Rock gently sailboat, rock us all to sleep.

 

 

 


 

 

Rock me easy, rock me slow O

 

 


A lullaby by Dennis Lee to the tune of Elvis Presley’s ‘Love me tender’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rock me easy, rock me slow,

Rock me where the robins go,

Rock the branch and rock the bough,

Rock the baby robins now.

Rock me up and rock me down,

Rock me off to sleepy town,

Rock me gently up the stairs

To snuggle with my teddy bears,

Rock me easy, rock me slow,

Rock me where the robins go.

 


 

 

Rockaby, lullaby 🔊

 

 


A poem by Josiah Gilbert Holland 1819-1881.

Music by Dany Rosevear

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rockaby, lullaby, bees in the clover!

Crooning so drowsily, crying so low,

Rockaby, lullaby, dear little rover!

Down into wonderland,

Down to the under-land,

Go, now go!

Down into wonderland go.

 

Rockaby, lullaby, rain on the clover!

Tears on the eyelids that waver and weep,

Rockaby, lullaby, bending it over!

Down on the mother-world,

Down on the other world,

Sleep, oh sleep!

Down on the mother-world sleep.

 

Rockaby, lullaby, dew on the clover!

Dew on the eyes that will sparkle at dawn,

Rockaby, lullaby, dear little rover!

Into the stilly world,

Into the lily world,

Gone! now gone!

Into the lily world gone.


 

 

 

Rock-a-bye baby O

 

 


One of the most familiar lullabies in the English language.

Find out more about its history at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock-a-bye_Baby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rock-a-bye baby, on the treetop,

When the wind blows, the cradle will rock,

When the bough breaks, the cradle will fall,

Down will come baby, cradle and all.

 

Rock-a-bye baby, thy cradle is green,

Daddy’s a nobleman, Mummy’s a queen,

Betty’s a lady, and wears a gold ring,

Johnny’s a drummer, and drums for the king.

 

 

 


 

 

Rock-a-bye you 🔊

 

 


A soft lullaby by Theresa Mckay.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rock-a-bye you high, rock-a-bye you low,

Rock-a-bye you close, rock-a-bye you slow,

Rock-a-bye you high, rock-a-bye you low,

Rock-a-bye you everywhere we go.

 

Rock-a-bye the sun, rock-a-bye the moon,

Rock-a-bye the sweet flowers growing in June,

Rock-a-bye you love, my turtle dove,

Rock-a-bye you everywhere we go.

 


 

 

 

Rockin’ by the baby O

 

 


This song from the Appalachians will give the baby a good workout on your knee! Choose which of the verses you would like to sing. Give a hug for each ‘wrap him up’ and make appropriate actions to suit the words.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


What shall we do when the baby cries? x2

Wrap him up in a table cloth,

Toss him up in the old hay loft.

Chorus

Rock in’ by the baby, rock in’ by the baby,

Rock in’ by the baby, rock in’ by the baby-o.

 

What shall we do with the baby-o? x2

Pull his toes, tickle his chin,

Wrap him up in a counterpin.

Chorus

 

What shall we do with the baby-o? x2

Dance him north, dance him south,

Pour a little moonshine in his mouth.

Chorus

 

What shall we do with the baby-o? x2

Wrap him up in calico,

And give him to his daddy-o.

Chorus

 

 

 

 

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