For the very young R-W

Rabbit ain’t got no tail at all

Reach for the stars (Bend and stretch)

Roly poly, roly poly

Rose, Rose, and up she rises

Sana, sana, colita de rana

Skip around the room

See how I’m jumping

See the ponies galloping

Sometimes I’m very, very small

Sweet water rolling

Swing me over the water

Tall and small

The alphabet song

The little white duck

Thumbkin, Pointer

Tickle the clouds

Turn around and touch the ground

We’re clapping

What little animals say

Where, oh where has my little dog gone?

Wiggly is a wee, wee worm

Last updated: 7/11/2018 11:26 AM

These songs are nursery rhymes and other traditional songs compiled, illustrated and music arranged by Dany Rosevear.

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2013 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

Rabbit ain’t got no tail at all O

 

A traditional song sung to the tune of ‘Mary had a little lamb’. It is possible that this song originated in the Afro American plantations as the rabbit – a wily fellow.

We all need to live a more simple life and with less clutter we might be a happier too.

 

Mime actions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rabbit ain't got no tail at all,

Tail at all, tail at all,

Rabbit ain't got no tail at all,

Just a powder-puff.

 

Rabbit don't wear no cutaway coat…

Just a suit of fur.

 

Rabbit don't eat no bacon and egg…

Just a field of grass.

 

Rabbit don't need no pots and pans…

Just a set of teeth.

 

Rabbit don't have no limousine…

Just his own four legs.

 

Rabbit don't need to build no house…

Just a deep dark hole.


 

 


 

 

Reach for the stars

(Bend and stretch) O

 

 


Exercise, music and information about the solar system – what is not to like!

This song came from the long running TV series for 4-5 year olds ‘Romper Room’. Produced in the USA it was syndicated to many English speaking countries.

The third verse has been added for those children fascinated by the solar system.

 

1st verse: 1. Bend low and stretch arms up high 2. With arms up high bend to the left and then the right. 3. As before 4. Reach up high on tiptoes.

2nd verse: 1. As before 2-4. Whirl round and round, up and down.

3rd verse: 1. As before 2-3. Touch head and toes, repeat and reverse. 4. Slowly sink down, crouch, put hands to cheek and sleep.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bend and stretch, reach for the stars,

There goes Jupiter, here comes Mars.

Bend and stretch, reach for the sky,

Stand on tippy toes, oh so high!

 

Bend and stretch, ever so high,

Mercury, Venus and Saturn go by,

Planets, stars, comets, the moon,

See them twinkle and shimmer and zoom.

 

Bend and stretch, see me grow,

I'm so tall from head to toe!

Head to toe , toe to head,

Down, down, down in my warm snug bed.

 


 

 

Roly poly, roly poly O

 

Learn about opposites, to distinguish between left and right and how to be still.

The first verse alone might be enough for the youngest children.

 

Roll arms round each other and follow the actions suggested by the words. On the last word fold arms and remain very still; not an easy task!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Roly poly, roly poly, up, up, up,

Roly poly, roly poly, down, down, down.

Roly poly, roly poly, out, out, out,

Roly poly, roly poly, in, in, in.

 

Roly poly, roly poly, high, high, high,

Roly poly, roly poly, low, low, low.

Roly poly, roly poly, oh, so slow,

Roly poly, roly poly, fast, fast, fast.

 

Roly poly, roly poly, left, left, left,

Roly poly, roly poly, right, right, right.

Roly poly, roly poly, go, go, go,

Roly poly, roly poly, roly poly… STOP!

 


 

 

Rose, Rose, and up she rises 🔊

 

 


A waking-up song from Kentucky and collected by Cecil Sharp; based on ‘What shall we do with the drunken sailor’. Exchange names to suit the audience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rose, Rose, and up she rises,

Rose, Rose, and up she rises,

Rose, Rose, and up she rises,

So early in the morning.

 

What shall we do with sleepy Cameron,

What shall we do with sleepy Cameron,

What shall we do with sleepy Cameron,

So early in the morning.

 

Wake him up and shake him up,

Wake him up and shake him up,

Wake him up and shake him up,

So early in the morning.

 

Hooray and up he rises,

Hooray and up he rises,

Hooray and up he rises,

So early in the morning.

 


 

 

Sana sana colita de rana 🔊

 

 


A traditional rhyme to help children recover from every day scrapes, bumps and bruises; gently rub the affected part as you sing the song.

There are some lovely ideas to help young children learn the Spanish names of parts of the body linked with this song at:  http://www.spanishplayground.net/sana-sana-colita-de-rana-body-parts-lesson/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sana sana

colita de rana,

si no sanas hoy,

sanarás mañana

 

Heal, heal, heal,

Little tail of the frog.

If you don’t heal today,

You will heal tomorrow.

 


 

 

 

See how I’m jumping O

 

This lovely tune in the minor key is Flemish folk air. The words come from Angela Diller and Elizabeth Quaile’s ‘First solo book’.

 

Jump up and down in time to the music; on the word ‘still’ freeze for a long pause and then begin jumping again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


See how I'm jumping, jumping, jumping!

See how I'm jumping everywhere!

You didn't know I could jump so high.

You didn't know I could stand so still.

See how I'm jumping, jumping, jumping!

When I am tired, down I flop.

 

See how I'm jumping, jumping, jumping!

See how I'm bouncing like a ball!

You didn't know I could jump so high.

You didn't know I could stand so still.

See how I'm jumping, jumping, jumping!

When I am tired, then I stop.

 


 

 

See the ponies galloping 🔊

 

 


Move fast, move slow.

This can be played as a lap play game with baby or used for young children to gallop in a big space or round in a circle.

 

Gallop fast around the room before slowing down and then bringing everyone together to sit calmly in a circle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


See the ponies galloping, galloping, down the country lane,

See the ponies galloping, galloping down the country lane,

See the ponies galloping, galloping down the country lane.

See the ponies coming home, all tired out,

All tired out, all, tired, out!

 


 

 

Skip around the room O

 

This has been traditionally sung in the U.S.A. as an energetic follow up to the Happy Birthday song. More usually the third line is sung as ‘We won’t shut up…’!

 

Skipping is a quite difficult movement for young feet and you might need to teach children how to skip – step, hop, step, hop. Get them to suggest other ways to move.

 

Start in a space and encourage children to give each other plenty of room as they move about.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Skip around the room,

Skip around the room,

We won’t stop singing

‘Til we’ve skipped around the room!

 

Bounce around the room,

Bounce around the room,

We won’t stop bouncing

‘Til we’ve bounced around the room!

 

Hop around the room,

Hop around the room,

We won’t stop hopping

‘Til we’ve hopped around the room!

 

Stamp around the room,

Stamp around the room,

We won’t stop stamping

‘Til we’ve stamped around the room!


 

 


 

 

Sometimes I’m very, very small O

 

 


Learn the concept of tall and small or play for an opposites theme in this song by Edith Hedley.

This game is played with two or more children or with an adult and child.

 

Initially one child crouches down and then stands very tall. The second child then turns away with eyes covered and guesses whether the first child is standing tall or crouching. If correct they swap places.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sometimes I’m very, very small,

Sometimes I’m very, very tall:

Shut your eyes and turn around,

And guess which I am now?

 


 

 

Sweet water rolling 🔊

 

 


A song from South Carolina that can be used as a ball rolling activity for parents and children; parent / carer sit in a circle with a baby / youngsterbetween their legs and roll the ball to another pair. Older ones might be able to cope with the game below.

 

Sit opposite your toddler and gently roll the ball to their outstretched legs. Encourage them to roll it back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sweet water rolling,

Sweet water roll,

Rolling from the fountain,

Sweet water roll.

 

 


 

 

Swing me over the water 🔊

 

 


Young children love to be swung between to adults, ideally kicking an adult in front with their feet! This song would be a good one to accompany such foolishness. Traditionally in the playground it was used for skipping and ball bouncing.

 

Sit opposite your toddler and gently roll the ball to their outstretched legs. Encourage them to roll it back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Swing me over the water,

Swing me over the sea.

Swing me over the garden wall

And swing me home for tea.

 

Swing me over the tree tops,

Swing me over the zoo,

Swing me over the garden wall

And swing me back to you.

 


 

 

 

 

Tall and small 🔊

 

 


Move up and down to learn the concepts of tall, small and high.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

1. Stand tall like a giant. 2. Slowly sink to the floor. 3. Slowly rise. 4. Stand tall, stretch, and reach arms high.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Here is a giant who is tall, tall, tall,

Here is an elf who is small, small, small.

The elf who is small will try, try, try,

To reach to the giant who is high, high, high.


 

 

 

The alphabet song O

 

Learn about the names and the sounds of the letters of the alphabet in this extended version by Dany Rosevear.

 

 


A, B, C, D, E, F, G,

H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P,

Q, R, S, T, U, V,

W, X, Y and Z.

Now I know my A, B, C,

Next time won’t you sing along with me!

 

a, b, c, d, e, f, g,

h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p,

q, r, s, t, u, v,

w, x, y and z.

If you know your letter sounds,

Clap your hands and touch the ground!

 

Apple, bee, cat, dog, egg, frog, goat,

Hat, ink, jug, kite, leg, moon, nest, octopus, and piggy in a coat,

Queen, rainbow, sun, turtle, umbrella, van,

Whale, x-ray, yo-yo and zip.

Now I know my a, b, c,

I can spell and read words easily!

 

 


 

 

The little white duck O

 

Recognise the noise animals make and enjoy a big roar at the end of this song by Leigh Wigglesworth. Second antipodean verse was written by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The little white duck says,

‘Quack, quack, quack,’

The donkey says,

‘Ee-yore’,

The little pink pig says,

‘Oink, oink, oink,’

And the lion?

He says, ‘ROARRR!’

 

The red kangaroo goes,

‘Thump, thump, thump,’

The black crow just says,

‘Caw!’

The old crocodile goes,

‘Snap, snap, snap,’

And koala sleeps and snores!


 

 

Thumbkin, Pointer 🔊

 

 


A simple hand play. Fingers have been given many names but very young children love to hear new sounds and are fascinated by their fingers.

Melody by Dany Rosevear.

With a baby touch each finger one at a time then roll hands round each other.

 

Raise fingers one at a time then wiggle them all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Thumbkin, Pointer,

Middleman big,

Silly man, Wee man,

Rig a jig jig.


 

 

 

Tickle the clouds 🔊

 

 


A great excuse for a stretch after storytime and with the second verse a bedtime song.

Music and second verse by Dany Rosevear.

 

Move as the words suggest making a big stretches when reaching up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tickle the clouds.

Tickle your toes.

Turn around

And tickle your nose.

Reach down low.

Reach up high.

Storytime’s over

So wave goodbye!

 

Wave to the stars.

Wave to the moon.

Jump into your rocket

And “Zoom, zoom, zoom!”

Pull up the covers

And snuggle down tight.

Sweet dreams are calling,

“Goodnight, goodnight.”

 


 

 

Turn around and touch the ground O

 

 


Children love the opportunity to spin and fall. Older children would enjoy other instructions learning about parts of the body: wiggle your hips, slap your knees, nod your head etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Turn around and touch the ground,

Turn around and touch the ground,

Turn around and touch the ground,

And fall right down!

 

Turn around and stretch up high,

Turn around and stretch up high,

Turn around and stretch up high,

And fall right down!

 


 

 

 

We’re clapping O

 

A movement activity for the very young.

Adapted by Dany Rosevear from a Dutch nursery favourite.

 

Stand in a space. Move around the room clapping.

Stand still and make two firm claps on CLAP! CLAP!

Continue moving performing a new action each time a couplet is sung.

At the end of the third verse stand still and take a picture.

Last verse pair up with a partner and shake hands then wave move to a space and sit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


We’re clapping, we’re clapping,

We’re clapping, CLAP! CLAP!

Now we’re flying, now we’re flying,

Now we’re flying, FLIP! FLAP!

 

We’re jumping, we’re jumping,

We’re jumping, JUMP! JUMP!

Now we’re stamping, now we’re stamping,

Now we’re stamping, STAMP! STAMP!

 

We’re running, we’re running,

We’re running, TRIT! TROT!

Now we’re hunting, now we’re hunting,

Now we’re hunting, GOOD SHOT!

 

We’re swimming, we’re swimming,

We’re swimming, SPLISH! SPLASH!

Now we’re drumming, now we’re drumming

Now we’re drumming, BANG! CRASH!!

 

We’re meeting and greeting,

We’re meeting, say HI!

Now we’re waving, now we’re waving,

Now we’re waving, BYE! BYE!


 

 


 

 

What little animals say 🔊

 

 


A song with descending pitch. Hand play devised by Dany Rosevear.

From ‘Music for the nursery school’ published by Linda Chestermanin 1935. Written by E.S and adapted by S.D&J. whoever they may be!!!

 

Pigeon: hands to cheek. Cow: forefingers make horns on head. Lambkin: waggle forefingers for lambs tails. Crow: open and close thumb and forefinger. Owl: thumb and forefinger round eyes. Kitten: brush whiskers. Duckling: spread fingers of hand and make them waddle. Hen: Flap elbows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pigeon coo, coo,

Moo-cow moo, moo,

Lambkin, baa, baa,

Black crow, caw, caw,

Brown owl, hoo, hoo,

Kitten, mew, mew,

Duckling, quack, quack,

Hen says, cluck, cluck.


 

 

 

Where, oh where has my little dog gone? O

 

More often recognized as a traditional American song it was in fact written by Septimus Winner in 1855 to a German tune. The original version was a rather gruesome one where the dog gets turned into sausages.

It was also very popular on children’s radio when I was a child in the 1950s.

For more information on this song visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Septimus_Winner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Where, oh where has my little dog gone?

Oh where, oh where can he be?

With his tail cut short, and his ears cut long,

Oh where, oh where can he be?

 

My little dog always waggles his tail

Whenever he wants his grog.

And if the tail were more strong than he,

Why, the tail would waggle the dog.


 

 

 


 

 

 

Wiggly is a wee wee worm 🔊

 

 


A tickle or finger rhyme. A good one to encourage concentration.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

1. Hold up index finger. 2. Wiggle finger round. 3. Wiggle finger left, then to the right. 4. Wiggle finger near toes. 5. Wiggle finger up to nose. 6. Wiggle finger down to waist. 7. Creep into imaginary pocket, hands to head with eyes closed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Wiggly is a wee wee worm,

Who wiggles everywhere,

Can you keep an eye on it,

As it wiggles here and there?

 

Wiggly starts down at my toes,

And wiggles way up to my nose!

It wiggles back down without a peep,

Creeps into my pocket and goes to sleep!


 

 

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