For the very young I-P

I can run as fast as you

I have two eyes to see with

I met a little tidy mouse

I’m a tall, tall tree

It’s time to put our coats on

Little friend, let’s merry be

Little horses, little horses

Little snail / Lilla snigel

Mary come a-runnin’

Mother, may I go out to swim?

My wonderful bundle of fun

Niddledy noddledy

On my face I have a nose

One little bumble bee

Owl in the tree says, “Whoo, whoo, whoo!”

Pickles in the pickle pot

Last updated: 11/6/2018 5:19 PM

These songs are nursery rhymes and other traditional songs compiled, illustrated and music arranged by Dany Rosevear.

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2013 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

I can run as fast as you 🔊

 

 


Children love a challenge, even when it means being quiet!

 

Move as the words suggest, finish sitting very still with arms crossed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I can run as fast as you.

I can run as fast as you.

I can run as fast as you.

Running on the spot.

 

I can jump as high as you…

 

I can march as fast as you…

 

I can stamp as hard as you…

 

I can tiptoe as quiet as you…

 

I can sit as still as you….


 

 

I have two eyes to see with O

 

Many parts of our body come in twos but there is only one nose.

 

Point to eyes, run up and down on feet, wave hands and point to nose, ears, tongue and cheeks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I have two eyes to see with,

I have two feet to run,

I have two hands to wave with,

And nose I have but one.

I have two ears to hear with,

And a tongue to say "Good day".

And two red cheeks for you to kiss...

But now I’ll run away!

 


 

 

I met a little tidy mouse 🔊

 

 


It’s time to put toys and activities back in the right place; the ‘tidy mouse’ song will help children to respond to this task calmly and with a sense of purpose.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I met a little tidy mouse,

He said “Let's tidy up this house,

Tidy, tidy here and there,

Tidy, tidy everywhere!

Tidy, tidy everywhere!”


 

 

 

I'm a tall, tall tree 🔊

 

 


A beautiful action song for all seasons by Lorraine Lee Hammond 1979, Snowy Egret Music. Make movements slowly and with a sense of wonder.

 

For each verse start at the feet and run hands up the body and into the air to make branches. Then open hands for blossom, bend slowly in the wind, drop apples gently and fingers move down wards like snowflakes and then shiver.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This is my trunk; I'm a tall, tall tree,

In the springtime the blossoms grow on me.

They open, they open.

 

This is my trunk; I'm a tall, tall tree,

In the summer the breezes blow through me.

I bend, I bend.

 

This is my trunk; I'm a tall, tall tree,

In the autumn the apples grow on me.

They drop, they drop.

 

This is my trunk; I'm a tall, tall tree.

In the winter the snowflakes fall on me.

Brrr, Brrr.

 


 

 

It’s time to put our coats on 🔊

 

 


A song for a chilly day. Get outside in every weather but make sure clothing is fit for the conditions.

This song can be used for any sort of weather; encourage children to make suitable choices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


It's time to put our coats on,

Our coats on, our coats on,

It's time to put our coats on,

It's so cold outside!

With winter winds blowing,

And rosy cheeks glowing,

It's time to put our coats on,

It's so cold outside!


 

 

Little friend, let’s merry be 🔊

 

 


This is a simple partner game from Germany which was translated by Mabel F. Wilson in 1961 for OUP’s ‘Music Time’.

 

Line 1. Each child faces a partner. 2. They join hands. 3. They take two sliding steps to the left and then to the right. 4. Swing round together on the spot.

Verses 2 and 3: Repeat the dance keeping hands joined.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Little friend, let's merry be,

Stretch out both you hands to me;

Tripping here and tripping there,

Then turn round as light as air.

 

You love dancing I can tell,

And you’ve learned this lesson well.

Tripping here and tripping there,

Then turn round as light as air.

 

Once more let us play this game,

It is fun to do the same.

Tripping here and tripping there,

Then turn round as light as air.

 


 

 

 

Little horses, little horses  🔊

 

 


Can also be sung as a lullaby.

Stay still and then gallop or trot through open spaces and then come together and settle calmly.

Encourage children to be aware of others moving and give each other plenty ofspace.

This is a version of ‘My horses ain’t hungry’ for the very young as suggested by Ruth Crawford Seeger in her wonderful ‘American folk songs for children’. I have adapted the verses to provide a sequence.

 

1. ‘Horse’ wake up stretching and eat hay, look around and begin to gallop. 2. Move faster, music is played to extend galloping play 3. Move back to the barn. 4. Settle down and ‘sleep’ with hands to cheek.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Little horses, little horses,

Come out of your barn,

The door is wide open,

The sunshine is warm.

 

Faster:

Little horses, little horses,

Come gallop away,

The prairie’s wide open,

It’s time for your play.

 

La, lala, la, lala … Music plays

 

Little horses, little horses,

Come back to your barn.

The door is wide open,

Your blankets are warm.

 

Little horses, little horses,

Everything is all right;

Curl up on your blankets

And sleep through the night.


 

 

Little snail /  Lilla snigel O

 

 


A nursey rhyme from Sweden.

Hear it sung in Swedish at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSfUc47P8iY

 

With fist closed and two fingers out and move hand up arm. Wag finger. Repeat then cuddle snail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Little snail take care, take care,

Here and there, everywhere.

Little snail take care, take care,

Or I'll pick you up!

Lilla snigel, akta dej,

akta dej, akta dej,

Lilla snigel, akta dej,

Annars tar jag dej.

 

Little snail, please come to me,

Come to me, come to me!

Little Snail, please come to me,

I’ll give you a hug!

Lilla snigel kom till mig,

Kom till mig, kom till mig!

Lilla snigel kom till mig,

Jag vill krama dig!


 

 

Mary come a-runnin’ 🔊

 

 


Become familiar with the days of the week and identify which day it is before singing this song. Ask individual children to choose a movement for the others to perform.

Learn to move without touching others and in and out of spaces.

This song has its roots in the spiritual ‘Sister Mary come a-runnin’’ and the Easter story.

 

Move freely in and out of each other.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mary come a-runnin’ on Monday morning,

Monday morning, Monday morning,

Mary come a-runnin’ on Monday morning,

Monday morning, soon!

 

Isaac come a-runnin’ on Tuesday morning,

Tuesday morning, Tuesday morning,

Isaac come a-runnin’ on Tuesday morning,

Tuesday morning, soon!

 

Martha come a-runnin’ on Wednesday morning,

Wednesday morning, Wednesday morning,

Martha come a-runnin’ on Wednesday morning,

Wednesday morning, soon!

 


 

 

Mother, may I go out to swim? O

 

Another way to learn your alphabet.

 

This song has its origins in a much older song bought over to the Americas by Europeans; this children’s version has been sung for well over a hundred years as a way of passing on learning of the alphabet down to new generations.

For more information see: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=30547

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mother, may I go out to swim?”

“Yes, my darling daughter.

Hang your clothes on a hick’ry limb,

But don’t go near the water!”

 

A B C D E F G,

H I J K L M,

N O P Q R S T,

And that’s the way to spell’em.

U V double U X Y Z,

Let the chorus ring’em,

Come and learn your ABC’s,

For that’s the way to sing’em!


 

 

 


 

 

My wonderful bundle of fun /

Pie in the sky 🔊

 

 


A waltz tune for those moments of happiness you feel like dancing with baby!

Words and music by Dany Rosevear.

 

Dance with baby, then raise them up high and drop down low.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My wonderful bundle, my bundle of fun,

My wonderful bundle of fun,

My pie in the sky

Flies up, up so high,

Up and over the moon,

Then down, down, down too soon!


 

 

Niddledy noddledy 🔊

 

 


A bedtime song from Linda Chesterman’s ‘Music for the nursery school’ published in 1935. Source of words are unknown. Sing ‘Turn off the light!’ if you rather sing the non-traditional version. Second verse adapted by Dany Rosevear.

 

Children can mimic the going to bed routine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Niddledy, noddledy, to and fro,

Tired and sleepy, to rest we go.

Jump into bed!

Blow out the light!

Head on the pillow...

Shut your eyes tight!

 

Shut your eyes tight!

Shut your eyes tight!

Head on the pillow...

Goodnight, goodnight!


 

 

 

On my face I have a nose 🔊

 

 


Learn to recognise and name each part of the body.

Music arranged by Dany Rosevear.

 

Point to each part of the body as it is mentioned. Run on the spot, raise arms and wave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


On my face I have a nose,

Way down here I have ten toes,

I have two eyes that I can blink,

I have a head to help me think,

I have a chin and very near,

I have two ears to help me hear,

I have a mouth from which to speak,

And when I run I use my feet.

Here are my arms to hold up high…

And here’s a hand to wave good-bye!

 


 

 

 

One little bumble bee O

 

 


A baby play song from Finland.

I would love to hear it sung in Finnish! If you have come across the words do let me know at: singingchildren@aol.com

Encourage older children to identify / choose where the bee might land next.

 

With thumb and finger together lightly tap part of the body mentioned.

Buzz as it flies off to another part and ask, ‘Where is it going next?’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One little bumble bee,

One little bumble bee,

One little bumble bee,

Bouncing on your head.

Bzzzzzzz!

...bouncing on your chin, arm, knee, tummy or any other part of the body.

 


 

 

Owl in the tree says, “Whoo, whoo, whoo!”🔊

 

 


Give children the confidence to introduce themselves to others in a comfortable setting.

 

Pass a toy owl round the circle, when the song stops the child holding the owl tells the others his or her name. Make sure everyone gets a turn. Older children can more add information ‘My name is… and I like to….’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Owl in the tree says, “Whoo, whoo, whoo!”

Owl in the tree says, “Whoo, whoo, whoo!”

Owl in the tree says, “Whoo, whoo, whoo,

Whoo, whoo are you?”

 


 

 

Pickles in the pickle pot 🔊

 

 


This simple rhyme has lovely speech sounds that the toddler with listen to with concentration. It can be used to distract a child while nappy changing.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

Squeeze each cheek gently. Tickle tummy and then under the chin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pickles in the pickle pot,

Cookies in the tin,

Tickles on the tummy,

And underneath the chin.


 

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