For the very young D-H

Dance, dance, baby!

Dance, my child, dance

Down by the greenwood sidey-o

Eye Winker, Tom Tinker

Flippity flop

Good morning to you, good morning to you

Have you heard the cat at night?

Here are my ears

Hickety tickety bumble-bee

Hop a little, skip a little

Humpty Dumpty fell in a puddle

Last updated: 5/18/2020 2:24 PM

These songs are nursery rhymes and other traditional songs compiled, illustrated and music arranged by Dany Rosevear.

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2013 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

Dance, dance, baby!  🔊

 

 


Words by Laurence Alma-Tadema, music by Horatio Parker.

Another song for very young children who are still a little wobbly on their feet. The parent or carer can hold both hands to help them dance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dance, dance, baby,

All the world is ours!

See the fishies in the brook,

Smile at all the flowers:

All the birds are ours to feed,

The sun's behind the showers;

Dance, dance, baby,

All the world is ours!

 

Sleep sweet baby,

All the world is ours!

We may gaze at all the stars,

Smile at Lady Moon:

Time to close your eyes and dream,

For morning will come soon.

Sleep sweet baby,

All the world is ours!


 

 

 

Dance, my child, dance O

 

This traditional German song‘Tanz, Kindchen, tanz‘ is by Julius Spengel and can also sung be as a round; It is also known as ‘Tanz, Kindlein, tanz’ with a slightly different tune.

In the original German the shoemaker makes some new shoes for the child. Substitute the child’s name for ‘my child’.

 

This is a song for very young children who are still a little wobbly on their feet. The parent or carers hold both their hands to help them dance round in a circle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dance, my child, dance!

Your shoes are good enough.

But do not let it worry you,

The cobbler soon will make them new,

Dance, my child, dance!.

Tanz, Kindchen, tanz!

Dein Schühlein sind noch ganz.

Lass sie dir nit gereue,

Der Schuster macht dir neue.

Tanz, Kindchen, tanz!

 


 

 

Down by the greenwood sidey-o 🔊

 

 


This children’s song from Virginia had its roots in the Child ballad ‘The cruel mother’ which was definitely not a children’s song! Find out more at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16241.

The song and game came from ‘American folk songs for children’ by Ruth Crawford Seeger.

 

Sit in a circle and roll the ball back and forth to the steady rhythm of the singing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One day I was sitting in my father’s hall,

I saw three babes a-playing ball.

All day long and I love you all,

Down by the greenwood sidey-o.


 

 

Eye winker, Tom Tinker 🔊

 

 


There are many, many versions of this baby play but this one is from Tom Glazer’s book of the same name with new words and tune.

 

Verse 1. Touch each eye. Tap nose then mouth. Wiggle chin.

Verse 2. & 3. Point to each bone mentioned, then wiggle chin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Eye winker, Tom Tinker, nose smeller, mouth eater.

Chin chopper, chin chopper, chin chopper, chopper chin.

 

The head bone, the neck bone, the elbow, the knee bone.

Chin chopper, chin chopper, chin chopper, chopper chin.

 

The shoulder bone, the wrist bone, the chest bone, the rest bone

Chin chopper, chin chopper, chin chopper, chopper chin.

 

Eye winker, Tom Tinker, nose smeller, mouth eater.

Chin chopper, chin chopper, chin chopper, chopper chin.


 

 

Flippity flop 🔊

 

 

 


Learn to follow instructions, move with a partner and stop after hopping energetically.

Words and music by Ruth McConn Spencer from ‘Songs of childhood’ published 1923. Second verse written and music arranged by Dany Rosevear.

 

1. Hop around like rabbits. On the word 'Stop!' stop hopping and 'freeze' 2. Do the same with a partner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Flippity flop! Flippity flop!

See how my dear little rabbit can hop!

Flippity flop! Flippity flop!

Dear Peter Rabbit, I wish you would stop!

Dear Peter Rabbit, I wish you would stop!

 

Flippity flop! Flippity flop!

Me and my rabbit together we’ll hop!

Flippity flop! Flippity flop!

Together, together, we’ll hop and then stop!

Together, together, we’ll hop and then stop!


 

 

 

Good morning to you, good morning to you 🔊

 

 


Greet each other in the morning circle. This is adapted from the song by Abbie Farwell Brown.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Good morning to you!

Good morning to you!

We're all in our places

With sunshiny faces,

For this is the way

To start the new day!

 

Good morning to you!

Good morning to you!

Our day is beginning

With playing and singing;

And outdoor fun too,

There's so much to do!

 

Good morning to you!

Good morning to you!

Whatever the weather,

We’ll make it together,

In work and in play,

A beautiful day!

 


 

 

 

Have you heard the cat at night? 🔊

 

 


Learn about nocturnal animal sounds.

Composer: Ron Gamack Publisher: ABC Music Publishing.

Continue to add other night time animals such as foxes, beetles, badgers, mice and moles until all the children are making night time animal noises!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Have you heard the cat at night?

Have you heard it miaow?

Miaow, miaow, mia-ow, miaow, miaow, miaow, miaow.

 

Have you heard the owl at night?

Have you heard it whoo-hoo?

Whoo-hoo, hoo-hoo-hoo, whoo-hoo-hoo!

 

Have you heard hedgehog at night?

Have you heard it squeal?

Huff, puff, sniff and snuff, huff, puff, squeal!

 

Bat… flip flap, squeak / Badger… snuffle, snort, / Fox… Yow-wow-wow, yelp


 

 

 

Here are my ears 🔊

 

 


Music Dany Rosevear.

Identify different parts of the body; with babies touch each part as you sing, older toddlers might be able to recognise and touch their own body parts as they sing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Here are my ears,

Here is my nose,

Here are my fingers,

Here are my toes.

Here are my eyes,

Both open wide,

Here is my mouth

With white teeth inside.

 

Here is my tongue,

That helps me speak.

Here is my chin,

And here are my cheeks.

Here are my hands,

That help me play.

Here are my feet

For walking today.


 

 

 

Hickety tickety bumble-bee O

 

 


This song encourages turn taking, singing solo in a comfortable situation and phonological awareness.

Play this game at the beginning of a school year to develop an easy familiarity with each other’s name and to get to know the children in a circle.

 

Children sit in a circle and the leader tosses a beanbag or rolls a ball to a child. This child sings ‘My name is…’ and then either rolls the ball to another child or back to the leader who once again rolls the ball to another child.

Older children can clap rhythm or whisper name as below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hickety tickety bumble-bee,

Can you sing your name to me?

My name is ----- (child’s name)

 

Everybody say it. "Mindy"

Everybody clap it. "Mindy"

Everybody snap it. "Mindy"

Everybody whisper it. "Mindy"

 


 

 

Hop a little, skip a little O

 

The first verse of this song is familiar through Barbara Ireson and Christopher Roe’s book ‘Over and over again’, the last two verses are popular through the internet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hop a little, skip a little,

Dance a little, then,

Hop a little, skip a little,

Then begin again.

 

Hop a little, jump a little,

One, two and three;

Run a little, skip a little,

Tap one knee;

 

Bend a little, stretch a little,

Nod your head;

Yawn a little, sleep a little,

In your bed.

 


 

 

Humpty Dumpty fell in a puddle  🔊

 

 


A song to console a distressed youngster.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,

Humpty Dumpty had a great fall;

Humpty Dumpty fell in a puddle, SPLASH!

And now Humpty Dumpty needs a big cuddle!


 

 

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