For the very young A-M

All my little ducklings

Andy Pandy, sugar and candy

Animal babies

Baby, baby clap your hands – two rhymes

Baby goes boom-boom

Ball rolling

Bibbidi bobbidi boo

Bubbles in the air

Can you walk on tiptoe?

Circle of the sun

Clap your hands little Andrew Brown

Clap your hands together like this

Cows in the kitchen

Crackers and crumbs

Cuckoo! Cherry tree

Dance, my child, dance

Down by the greenwood sidey-o

Eye Winker, Tom Tinker

Have you heard the cat at night?

Here are my ears

Hickety tickety bumble-bee

Hop a little, skip a little

Last updated: 10/30/2018 3:32 PM

These songs are nursery rhymes and other traditional songs compiled, illustrated and music arranged by Dany Rosevear.

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2013 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

All my little ducklings O

 

 


A traditional German song - Alle meine Entchen.

The words are loosely translated to fit the music rather that an exact match,

 

1. Squat and make a duck’s tail with hands behind back. Bob forwards – losing balance is part of the fun!

2. Fly like doves and make a roof over your head with hands.

3. Shuffle like chickens with feet in the straw and peck at the grain

4. Goslings walk in a single file round the room and make a round belly with the hands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


All my little ducklings,

Swimming here and there,

Swimming here and there,

Heads are in the water,

Tails are in the air.

 

All my little doves are,

Cooing in their nest,

Cooing in their nest,

One flies off into the air,

Followed by the the rest.

 

All my little chickens,

Scratching in the straw,

Scratching in the straw,

Find some grain, peck-a-peck,

Happy chicks once more.

 

All my little goslings,

Waddling in a line,

Waddlinge in a line,

Fluffy, round and perfect,

Every one is mine..

 

Alle meine Entchen,

Schwimmen auf dem See,

Schwimmen auf dem See,

Köpfchen in das Wasser,

Schwänzchen in die Höh.


 

 

Andy Pandy, sugar and candy 🔊

 

 


A simple circle game for the very young.

Learn to move together in a circle and synchronise actions.

 

Each time walk round in a circle holding hands. On ‘down’ drop with bent knees. On ‘up’ jump up. On ‘in’ move into the circle. Move round in a tight circle! On ‘out’ move back out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Andy Pandy, sugar and candy,

All pop down!

Andy Pandy, sugar and candy

All pop up!

Andy Pandy, sugar and candy

All pop in!

Andy Pandy, sugar and candy

All pop out!


 

 

 

Animal babies 🔊

 

 


What do the animals say? A traditional rhyme put to music by Moya Smith.

Name the babies and identify their sounds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The hen has a chicken, What does it say?

“Cheep, cheep, cheep, cheep,” All through the day.

 

The duck has a duckling, What does it say?

“Quack, quack, quack, quack,” All through the day.

 

The sheep has a lamb, What does it say?

“Baa, baa, baa, baa,” All through the day.

 

The pig has a piglet, What does it say?

“Oink, oink, oink, oink,” All through the day.

 

The cat has a kitten, What does it say?

“Meow, meow, meow, meow,” All through the day.

 

The dog has a puppy, What does it say? 

“Bow-wow, wow, wow,” All through the day.

 

The snail has a baby, What does it say?

It doesn’t say anything, All through the day.


 

 

Baby, baby clap your hands 🔊

 

 


Two rhymes, a bounce and a tickle.

Tune by Dany Rosevear.

 

1. Clap hands with baby as you bounce baby on your knee. Tip baby gently to one side. 2. Clap hands with baby. Tickle corner of baby's mouth. Tickle baby's knees and legs and then feet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Baby, baby, clap your hands!

Where London's built, there London stands,

And there's a bed in London Town,

On which my baby shall lie down.

 

Baby, baby, clap your hands!

Smile your smile so sweet,

Bend your knees, stretch your legs!

And tickle little feet!


 

 

Baby goes boom-boom 🔊

 

 


A song to sing when baby falls down and needs to be distracted from the hurt. A kiss and a cuddle will also be needed!! Translation finto the French from “Bringing up baby bilingual”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Boom, boom, baby goes boom-boom,

Baby goes boom-boom down!

You might cry, but everybody does it,

Everybody boom-booms down!

 

Boum, boum, bebe fait boum-boum,

Bebe fait ba-da-boum!

Tu pleures, mais tout le monde le fait,

Tout le monde ba-da-boum!


 

 

 

Ball rolling 🔊

 

 


Build up a child’s confidence to say their name to a familiar or unfamiliar person / child. Use this circle activity according to children’s physical and emotional development.

 

1. Sit in a circle or opposite a parent / carer / partner with legs apart. Roll ball gently across the floor for child to receive. 2. Do the same with a gentle bounce. 3. Encourage child to say their name before rolling the ball back. Greet the child with their name.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I roll the ball to you, you roll the ball to me.

I roll the ball to you, you roll the ball to me.

I roll the ball to you, you roll the ball to me.

I roll the ball to you, and you roll the ball to me.

 

I bounce the ball to you…

 

I roll the ball to you, can you say your name? ----

Hello ---- and how are you? Now roll it back again!


 

 

Bibbidi bobbidi boo 🔊

 

 


From Disney’s 1950s film ‘Cinderella’ Written by Mack David, Al Hoffman and Jerry Livingston.

A song I loved to sing as a young girl but babies also would love the sound of the nonsense words and being jiggled to this tune.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Salagadoola, menchicka boola,

Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo;

Put’em together and what have you got?

Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo.

 

Salagadoola, menchicka boola,

Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo;

It'll do magic, believe it or not,

Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo.

 

Salagadoola means,

Menchicka booleroo,

But the thingamabob that does the job

Is bibbidi-bobbidi-boo.

 

Salagadoola, menchicka boola,

Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo;

Put them together and what have you got?

Bibbidi-bobbidi, bibbidi-bobbidi,

Bibbidi-bobbidi-boo.


 

 

Bubbles in the air 🔊

 

 


A song for moving among the bubbles as they are blown.

Have bare arms and feet to enjoy the feel of bubbles popping.

 

Catch bubbles all around. Stretch up high to do the same. Move low to catch bubbles before they land.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There are bubbles in the air, bubbles in the air,

Ee-eye-addio, bubbles everywhere.

 

There are bubbles way up high, bubbles way up high,

Ee-eye-addio, bubbles high up in the sky.

 

There are bubbles way down low, bubbles way down low,

Ee-eye-addio, and they tickle on your toes!


 

 

 

 

Can you walk on tiptoe? O

 

A nursery favourite.

 

Move as the words suggest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Can you walk on tiptoe,

As softly as a cat?

And can you stamp along the road,

Stamp, stamp, just like that?

 

Can you take some great big strides,

Just like a giant can?

Or walk along so slowly

Like a poor bent old man.


 

 


 

 

Circle of the sun 🔊

 

 

 


Words and music by Sally Rogers of Connecticut, an amazing folk singer, songwriter and educator. The full version describes the life cycle of a child.

You can cuddle a young child as you sing or bounce on your knee; such a rhythmic tune also lends itself to dancing and clapping.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Babies are born in the circle of the sun,

Circle of the sun on the birthing day.

Babies are born in the circle of the sun,

Circle of the sun on the birthing day.

Chorus:

Clouds to the north, clouds to the south,

Wind and rain to the east and the west.

But, babies are born in the circle of the sun

Circle of the sun on the birthing day…

 

Children learn to walk in the circle of the sun,

Circle of the sun on the walking day.

Children learn to walk in the circle of the sun,

Circle of the sun on the walking day…

 

Children learn to talk in the circle of the sun,

Circle of the sun on the talking day.

Children learn to talk in the circle of the sun,

Circle of the sun on the talking day…

 

Children learn to dance in the circle of the sun,

Circle of the sun on the dancing day.

Children learn to dance in the circle of the sun,

Circle of the sun on the dancing day…

 

Children learn to sing in the circle of the sun,

Circle of the sun on the singing day.

Children learn to sing in the circle of the sun,

Circle of the sun on the singing day…

 

 


 

 

Clap your hands little Andrew 🔊

 

 

 


Change to name of child when this is sung. This delightful song can be found in John M. Feierabend’s wonderful collection ‘Clapping and tapping’.

 

Sit baby / young child on your lap facing you , hold their hands and make them clap.clap. Older children can sit in a circle and choose a motion taking it in turns to clap, stamp and nod as their name is sung.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Clap your hands little Andrew.

Clap your hands little Andrew Brown.

Clap your hands little Andrew.

Clap your hands Andrew Brown.

 

Stamp your feet little Andrew.

Stamp your feet little Andrew Brown.

Stamp your feet little Andrew.

Stamp your feet Andrew Brown.

 

Nod your head…

 


 

 

 

Clap your hands together like this 🔊

 

 

 


Follow simple instructions, move together and learn about different body parts.

A song from Infant Joy’ by Desmond MacMahon in1954. It has been slightly adapted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Clap your hands together like this,

Clap your hands together like this,

Clap your hands together like this,

Oh, clap your little hands.

 

Stamp your feet together like this…

Knock your knees together like this…

Click your heels together like this…

Wiggle your hips together like this…

Wave your arms together like this…

 


 

 

Cows in the kitchen O

 

Tom Farmer has fallen asleep and allowed the farm animals into the house – he needs to be woken up! (It is a good idea to place hands round the mouth when shouting to protect children’s ears!)

Children can have great fun making up other alliterative lines for more farmyard animals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Cows in the kitchen, moo, moo, moo,

Cows in the kitchen, moo, moo, moo,

Cows in the kitchen, moo, moo, moo,

What shall we do Tom Farmer?

 

Ducks in the dustbin, quackerdy doo,

Ducks in the dustbin, quackerdy doo,

Ducks in the dustbin, quackerdy doo,

What shall we do Tom Farmer?

 

Cats in the cupboard, doggies too,

Cats in the cupboard, doggies too,

Cats in the cupboard, doggies too,

What shall we do Tom Farmer?

 

Pigs in the pantry, oink, oink, oink,

Pigs in the pantry, oink, oink, oink,

Pigs in the pantry, oink, oink, oink,

What shall we do Tom Farmer?

 

Tom Farmer in the haystack fast asleep,

Tom Farmer in the haystack fast asleep,

Tom Farmer in the haystack fast asleep,

(SHOUT) Time to wake up Tom Farmer!

 

Chase them away with a shoo, shoo, shoo,

Chase them away with a shoo, shoo, shoo,

Chase them away with a shoo, shoo, shoo,

That's what we'll do Tom Farmer.

 


 

 

Crackers and crumbs 🔊

 

 

 


Learn to identify different parts of the body with this food related hand play.

Music and last verse Dany Rosevear.

 

Verses 1-3. Slap lap, clap hands, show each part of body, stretch arms up high.

Verse 4. Slap lap, clap hands, feed self, make rabbit ears with two fingers hop hand away.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Crackers and crumbs,

Crackers and crumbs,

These are my fingers,

These are my thumbs,

These are my eyes,

And these are my ears,

And I’m going to GROW in the next few years!

 

Pickles and cheese,

Pickles and cheese,

Here are my elbows

And here are my knees,

These are my eyes,

And these are my ears,

And I’m going to GROW in the next few years!

 

Bacon and eggs,

Bacon and eggs,

Here are my arms

And here are my legs,

These are my eyes,

And these are my ears,

And I’m going to GROW in the next few years!

 

Vegan verse:

Bubble and squeak,

Bubble and squeak,

These are the things

That I like to eat:

Carrots and broccoli,

Lettuce and beet;

I’ll turn into a rabbit in the next few weeks!

 


 

 

 

Cuckoo! Cherry tree 🔊

 

 


Another ball rolling game. The first verse is a very old ball game from ‘The Nursery Rhymes of Old England’ published in 1844 by James Orchard Halliwell. This can be omitted but children will enjoy the more complex words as they roll the ball.

 

Verses 1.&2. Sit in a circle or opposite a parent / carer / partner with legs apart. Roll ball gently across the floor for child to receive. 3. Do the same with a gentle bounce. 4. If a child is confident do the same with a throw.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Cuckoo! Cherry tree,

Catch a bird, and give it to me.

Let the tree be high or low,

Let it hail, or rain, or snow. Cuckoo!

 

Cuckoo! Cherry tree,

Catch the ball, roll it to me.

 

Cuckoo! Cherry tree,

Catch the ball, throw it to me.

 

Cuckoo! Cherry tree,

Catch the ball, bounce it to me.


 

 

 

Dance, my child, dance O

 

This traditional German song‘Tanz, Kindchen, tanz‘ is by Julius Spengel and can also sung be as a round; It is also known as ‘Tanz, Kindlein, tanz’ with a slightly different tune.

In the original German the shoemaker makes some new shoes for the child. Substitute the child’s name for ‘my child’.

 

This is a song for very young children who are still a little wobbly on their feet. The parent or carers hold both their hands to help them dance round in a circle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dance, my child, dance!

Your shoes are good enough.

But do not let it worry you,

The cobbler soon will make them new,

Dance, my child, dance!.

Tanz, Kindchen, tanz!

Dein Schühlein sind noch ganz.

Lass sie dir nit gereue,

Der Schuster macht dir neue.

Tanz, Kindchen, tanz!

 


 

 

Down by the greenwood sidey-o 🔊

 

 


This children’s song from Virginia had its roots in the Child ballad ‘The cruel mother’ which was definitely not a children’s song! Find out more at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=16241.

The song and game came from ‘American folk songs for children’ by Ruth Crawford Seeger.

 

Sit in a circle and roll the ball back and forth to the steady rhythm of the singing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One day I was sitting in my father’s hall,

I saw three babes a-playing ball.

All day long and I love you all,

Down by the greenwood sidey-o.


 

 

Eye winker, Tom Tinker 🔊

 

 


There are many, many versions of this baby play but this one is from Tom Glazer’s book of the same name with new words and tune.

 

Verse 1. Touch each eye. Tap nose then mouth. Wiggle chin.

Verse 2. & 3. Point to each bone mentioned, then wiggle chin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Eye winker, Tom Tinker, nose smeller, mouth eater.

Chin chopper, chin chopper, chin chopper, chopper chin.

 

The head bone, the neck bone, the elbow, the knee bone.

Chin chopper, chin chopper, chin chopper, chopper chin.

 

The shoulder bone, the wrist bone, the chest bone, the rest bone

Chin chopper, chin chopper, chin chopper, chopper chin.

 

Eye winker, Tom Tinker, nose smeller, mouth eater.

Chin chopper, chin chopper, chin chopper, chopper chin.


 

 

Have you heard the cat at night? 🔊

 

 


Learn about nocturnal animal sounds.

Composer: Ron Gamack Publisher: ABC Music Publishing.

Continue to add other night time animals such as foxes, beetles, badgers, mice and moles until all the children are making night time animal noises!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Have you heard the cat at night?

Have you heard it miaow?

Miaow, miaow, mia-ow, miaow, miaow, miaow, miaow.

 

Have you heard the owl at night?

Have you heard it whoo-hoo?

Whoo-hoo, hoo-hoo-hoo, whoo-hoo-hoo!

 

Have you heard hedgehog at night?

Have you heard it squeal?

Huff, puff, sniff and snuff, huff, puff, squeal!

 

Bat… flip flap, squeak / Badger… snuffle, snort, / Fox… Yow-wow-wow, yelp


 

 

 

Here are my ears 🔊

 

 


Music Dany Rosevear.

Identify different parts of the body; with babies touch each part as you sing, older toddlers might be able to recognise and touch their own body parts as they sing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Here are my ears,

Here is my nose,

Here are my fingers,

Here are my toes.

Here are my eyes,

Both open wide,

Here is my mouth

With white teeth inside.

 

Here is my tongue,

That helps me speak.

Here is my chin,

And here are my cheeks.

Here are my hands,

That help me play.

Here are my feet

For walking today.


 

 

 

Hickety tickety bumble-bee O

 

 


This song encourages turn taking, singing solo in a comfortable situation and phonological awareness.

Play this game at the beginning of a school year to develop an easy familiarity with each other’s name and to get to know the children in a circle.

 

Children sit in a circle and the leader tosses a beanbag or rolls a ball to a child. This child sings ‘My name is…’ and then either rolls the ball to another child or back to the leader who once again rolls the ball to another child.

Older children can clap rhythm or whisper name as below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hickety tickety bumble-bee,

Can you sing your name to me?

My name is ----- (child’s name)

 

Everybody say it. "Mindy"

Everybody clap it. "Mindy"

Everybody snap it. "Mindy"

Everybody whisper it. "Mindy"

 


 

 

Hop a little, skip a little O

 

The first verse of this song is familiar through Barbara Ireson and Christopher Roe’s book ‘Over and over again’, the last two verses are popular through the internet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hop a little, skip a little,

Dance a little, then,

Hop a little, skip a little,

Then begin again.

 

Hop a little, jump a little,

One, two and three;

Run a little, skip a little,

Tap one knee;

 

Bend a little, stretch a little,

Nod your head;

Yawn a little, sleep a little,

In your bed.

 


 

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