More action songs D-G

 

Dandelions yellow

Do, do pity my case

Do your ears hang low?

Down by the banks of the Hanky Panky

Down is the earth

Everybody do this

Everybody knows I love my toes

Fairies’ marching song

Fire down below

Fly, fly, fly

Fly, little birdie, fly

Fooba Wooba John

Four white horses

Gilly gilly gilly good morning

Good morning dear Earth

Grab that spider tiger

 

Last updated: 7/13/2020 2:34 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we go’ Round and about

compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

Return to the Singing games for children’ home

To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

Dandelions yellow 🔊

 

 


Provide real dandelions.

I found this rhyme in: ‘Materials for nursery school teachers’ edited by Virginia McCaig,

there is no publishing date. Music and actions by Dany Rosevear.

 

1. Make dandelions with open hands, place hands over head. 2. As before then nod head.

3. As before. 4. As before, blow, wiggle fingers and float them away.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dandelions yellow, hiding in the grass.

Dandelions pretty, nodding as I pass.

Dandelions silver, dandelions grey,

Dandelions pretty, I'll blow your hair away!

 


 

 

 

 

Do, do, pity my case 🔊

 

 


This dramatic play was found in Ladybird Book’s ‘Action Rhymes’ published in 1976. One of the earlier African-American sources was from Louisiana and published in ‘Games and Songs of American Children’ 1883.

Ask children to suggest new tasks. The song could also be used to encourage solo sing; throw a ball at a child who sings a task and then passes to another child to do the same. If the song feels a little old-fashioned sing’ So much work to do’ instead of ‘In some lady’s garden’.

 

Walk round in a circle for first two lines then act out each task as it is sung.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Do, do, pity my case

In some lady's garden;

My clothes to wash when I get home,

In some lady's garden.

 

Do, do, pity my case,

In some lady's garden;

My clothes to iron when I get home,

In some lady's garden.

 

Do, do, pity my case,

In some lady's garden;

My floors to scrub when I get home,

In some lady's garden.

 

Do, do, pity my case,

In some lady's garden;

My bread to bake when I get home,

In some lady's garden.

 


 

 

 

Do your ears hang low?O

 

Have fun with this action rhyme. First time sing with a normal voice and move as below. Second time stand and sing with a loud voice making big movements. Last time crouch down and while singing with a very quiet voice make teeny tiny movements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Do your ears hang low?

Do they wobble to and fro?

Can you tie them in a knot?

Can you tie them in a bow?

Can you toss them over your shoulder like a regimental soldier?

Do your ears hang low?

 

Twirl hands downwards.

Swing arms from side to side.

Mime tying a knot and then a bow.

 

Throw hands over shoulder.

Salute

Move as before


 

Down by the banks of the Hanky Panky O

 

 


There are very many versions of this rhyme mostly rooted in the African American tradition see: http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes for more background information.

 

This playground rhyme is mainly familiar in hand clap routines but is also a skipping, ball bouncing activity. Watch one of the clapping games at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zoMAvwKGfk

For young children just clap from side to side with a steady rhythm or jump like frogs from side to side with a big leap and fall to finish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Down by the banks of the Hanky Panky,

A bull frog jumped from bank to banky,

With a hip, hop and a flippity flippity flop,

Missed the banky and he went KERPLOP!

 

 


 

 

Down is the Earth 🔊

 

 


A meeting and greeting circle song.

Develop an awareness that we are all part of something big but need and welcome the company of our friends.

Musicbny Dany Rosevear.

 

1. Touch ground. 2. Raise hands to sky. 3. Gesture outward. 4. Hands crossed over chest.

5. Point to eyes then ears 6. Run on the spot. 7. Show hands, then hold those in the circle.

8. Raise hands high.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Down is the Earth,

Up is the Sky,

Here are my friends

And here stands I.

Two eyes to see, two ears to hear,

Two feet to walk and run!

Here are my hands, give yours to mine,

Good morning everyone!


 

 

Everybody do this O

 

Make up funny actions for others to imitate in this very easy game. A song by Mary Miller to the tune ‘Hey, Betty Martin’.

 

Make a circle; one child makes a funny action which those in the circle copy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Everybody do this,

Do this, do this,

Everybody do this,

Just like me.

Everybody do this,

Do this, do this,

Everybody do this,

Just like me.

 

 


 

 

Everybody knows that I love my toes 🔊

A lively

 

A lively song for toddler play and learning parts of the body.

Written by Barbara Allyn © SOCAN.

 

Touch each part of baby / toddler or young child’s own body part as it is mentioned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Everybody knows I love my toes,

Everybody knows I love my toes,

I love my knees, my elbows, my shoulders, and my nose,

But everybody knows I love my toes.

 

Everybody knows I love my hips,

Everybody knows I love my hips,

I love my knees, my elbows, my shoulders, and my lips,

But everybody knows I love my hips.

 

Everybody knows I love my shins,

Everybody knows I love my shins,

I love my knees, my elbows, my shoulders, and my chin,

But everybody knows I love my shins.

 

Everybody knows I love my thighs,

Everybody knows I love my thighs,

I love my knees, my elbows, my shoulders and my eyes,

But everybody knows I love my thighs.

 


 

 

 

Fairies’ marching song 🔊

 

 


A poem by Rose Fyleman from ‘Movement and songs for the littlest ones’ published 1959. It was originally published in ‘Child Education’ Music by Ruth Dyson, arranged by Dany Rosevear.

 

March around in pairs. Put hands to ears on ‘Ding dong’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One, two, one, two,

March along together,

Wear a daisy in your hat,

And a robin’s feather.

Chorus:

Ding, dong, far away,

Fairy bells are calling,

We shall get to fairy land

When the dew is falling.

 

One, two, one, two,

All the bees are humming,

All the birds begin to sing

When they see us coming.


 

 

Fire down below O

 

An old sea shanty song used to keep in rhythm when pumping up water on deck.

 

Make movements to the beat of the music: haul in ropes, pass buckets, tip water onto fire. Escape the fire by rowing to the shore!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Fire in the galley, fire down below;

It's fetch a bucket of water boys,

There's fire down below.

 

Chorus

Fire, fire, fire down below,

Fetch a bucket of water boys,

There's fire down below.

 

Fire in the fore-top, fire in the main;

It's fetch a bucket of water girls,

And put it out again.

 

Fire round the capstan, fire up the mast,

Fire on the main deck, burning fast.

 

 


 

 

Fly, fly, fly 🔊

 

 


A lovely song about flight for movements of birds and other animals with wings. Make up verses of other flying creatures.

 

Move around the room flying in different ways and then move or stop in an appropriate manner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Fly, fly, fly, Flap your wings and fly,

See how the eagle goes, Soaring through the sky.

 

Fly, fly, fly,Flap your wings and fly,

See how the owl goes, Swooping to the ground.

 

Fly, fly, fly, Flap your wings and fly,

See how butterfly goes, Dancng through the sky.

 

Fly, fly, fly, Flap your wings and fly,

See how robin goes, Hopping down the path.

 

Fly, fly, fly, Flap your wings and fly,

See how flamino goes, Standing on one leg.

 

Bzzzz, bzzzz, bzzzz, Flap your wings and fly,

See how bumble bee goes, Sitting on a flower.

Oh, so quiet!


 

 

 

Fly, little birdie, fly O

 

 


Originally translated from a Chinese song by Paul Knight it was written with teaching English to young children in mind. Find out more at: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?id=861062883975646&story_fbid=865587596856508

I have expanded on the theme for a wider young audience and to draw children together towards the end of the song after moving round the room individually.

 

Encourage children to think of other animals and how they might move to make new verses.

 

Move around the room flying, running and jumping. On the last verse come together in a circle and skip round.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Fly little birdie, fly,

Fly little birdie, fly,

Fly up in the sky,

La la la la la la, La la la la la la,

Spread your wings and fly!

Spread your wings and fly!

 

Run little puppy, run,

Run little puppy, run,

Play out in the sun,

La la la la la la, La la la la la la,

Run and run for fun!

Run and run for fun!

 

Jump, little froggie, jump,

Jump, little froggie, jump,

Jump up and down,

La la la la la la, La la la la la la,

Jumping off to town!

Jumping off to town!

 

Sing, little children, sing,

Sing, little children, sing,

Dance, play and sing,

La la la la la la, La la la la la la,

All around the ring!

All around the ring!

 

 


 

Fooba Wooba John O

 

This is a traditional American song made popular by Burl Ives in particular. Mike Seeger also made a great version ‘Old blind drunk John’ using a jaw harp.

 

Make up new rhymes for this song – it could go on ad infinitum.

 

This song can just be sung for its silliness but BethNotes at http://bethsmusicnotes.blogspot.co.uk/2011/09/fooba-wooba-lesson-view-more-documents.html suggests making hand motions to accompany the words.

My tune and words are slightly different though.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Saw a flea kick a tree,

Fooba Wooba, Fooba Wooba,

Saw a flea kick a tree,

Fooba Wooba John.

Saw a flea kick a tree

In the middle of the sea,

Hey John, ho John,

Fooba Wooba John.

 

Saw a snail chase a whale,

Fooba Wooba, Fooba Wooba,

Saw a snail chase a whale,

Fooba Wooba John.

Saw a snail chase a whale,

All around the water pail,

Hey John, ho John,

Fooba Wooba John.

 

Saw a frog chase a dog,

Fooba Wooba, Fooba Wooba,

Saw a frog chase a dog,

Fooba Wooba John.

Saw a frog chase a dog,

In and out a hollow log,

Hey John, ho John,

Fooba Wooba John.

 

Heard a cow say meow,

Fooba Wooba, Fooba Wooba,

Heard a cow say meow,

Fooba Wooba John.

Heard a cow say meow,

Then I heard her say bow wow,

Hey John, ho John,

Fooba Wooba John.

Hey John, ho John,

Fooba Wooba John.

 


 

 

Four white horses O

 

 

 


This is an old Caribbean folk song played in Barbados and the Virgin Islands.

Find more info and versions at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9634

 

Four children stand facing each other - two across from two. Each child has partner opposite and a neighbour to the side. Keeping a steady beat, the motions go like this:

Clap twice, pat partner's hands, clap twice, pat neighbour’s hands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Four white horses, on the river,

Hey, hey, hey, up tomorrow,

Up tomorrow is a rainy day,

Come on up to the shallow bay.

Shallow bay is a ripe banana,

Up tomorrow is a rainy day.

 


 

 

Gilly gilly gilly good morning 🔊

 

 


A cheerful meet and greet clapping and slapping song. Once children are confident with the basic game below they can then slap knees and clap hands in turn. Then find a partner and slap knees and clap partner’s hands. Older children could make up there own clapping, slapping, snapping finger patterns with a partner.

 

1. Walk around the room looking and waving at others when passing by. 2. Pat knees in time to the minnie macs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Gilly gilly gilly good morning,

Good morning, good morning!

Gilly gilly gilly good morning,

Good morning to you!

Minnie mac, minnie mac, minnie minnie minnie mac,

Minnie mac, minnie mac, minnie mo-o!

Minnie mac, minnie mac, minnie minnie minnie mac,

Minnie mac, minnie mac, minnie mo-o!

 


 

 

 

Good morning dear Earth 🔊

 

 


A greeting song to help children understand how we are all interconnected and part of a wider entity. Make up verses to include parts of the natural world around your own setting.

 

1. Touch ground. 2. Make circle above head with arms. 3. Place one hand curled on the other. 4. Open hands round face. 5. Cross forefingers and fly. 6. Cross hands at wrists and fly. 7. Open arms out then cross arms to chest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Good morning dear Earth,

Good morning dear Sun,

Good morning, dear stones

And the flowers every one.

Good morning, dear bees,

And the birds in the trees,

Good morning to you

And good morning to me!


 

 

Grab that spider, tiger 🔊

 

 


I wrote this one for a young child who was having difficulties with the ‘g’ and ‘c’ speech sounds. It could be chanted for a child that finds singing difficult.

 

1. Look fierce and make claws move. 2. Prowl. 3. Shake forefinger put to mouth, wipe away a tear. 4. Prowl, hand makes a spider. 5. Place hands on hips and give a big growl.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


“Grrr, grrr, grrr, grrr, grab that spider!”

Growls the great big prowling tiger,

“Please don’t giggle and please don’t cry,

If you see me going by,

In your garden chasing spiders,

For I’d be a grumpy tiger, Grrr!”


 


Return to the Singing games for children’ home