Song cupboard rounds and partner songs

Ah, poor bird

Brother Martin

Canoe song

Chain, chain, daisy chain

Come follow

Early in the morning / Kum bachur atzeil

Grasshoppers three

Hey, ho, nobody home

Ifca’s castle

Mr. Moon, Mr. Moon / Cuckoo!

Morning song

Now all the woods are waking

One bottle pop!

Peace round – The scarlet rose

Round and roud the Earth is turning

Sweetly sings the donkey

The frog in the bog

The little bells of Westminster / at Christmas time

Thirty days hath September

Two ducks on a pond

Where is John?

Whippoorwill

White coral bells

Whose pigs are these?

Why doesn’t my goose?

 

Find more rounds at:

A ram sam sam

Ah my little Augustine

Bonjour mes ami

Have you seen the Ghost of Tom?

Hot cross buns

I love the flowers

Kookaburra

London’s burning

Ride a cock horse

Row your boat

Sur le pont

The more we get together

The sun it rises

Three blind mice

Last updated: 11/6/2018 4:59 PM

The songs below compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.

 

Ah, poor bird O

 

 


An Elizabethan round.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Ah, poor bird,

Take thy flight,

Far above the sorrows

Of this dark night!

 

Ah, poor bird,

Mourn the tree,

Where sweetly thou did’st warble

In thy wand'rings free.

 

Ah poor bird,

Spread thy wings,

Soar in joy above the world

And sing, sing, sing!

 


 

 

Brother Martin 🔊

 

 


A three part round and Latin American folk song though I have not been able to find the South American source of this song. I found it in ‘Koloeoko’ published in 1983 by June Tillman. The tune is very similar to ‘O, how lovely is the evening’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Brother Martin climbs the tower,

Climbs the tower,

Pulls the rope to ring the hour,

Ring the hour.

Ding, dong, ding, dong, ding, dong.

 


 

 

Canoe song O

 

A traditional Canadian song written to help keep time when rowing a canoe.

This song works well as a round or sung with ‘Land of the silver birch’

My Paddle's Keen and Bright & Land of the Silver Birch

 

Move as in this video http://vimeo.com/31997644. Alternatively sit on the floor in groups of six or so one behind the other and row in time to the music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My paddles keen and bright,

Flashing with silver,

Follow the wild goose flight,

Dip, dip and swing,

Dip, dip and swing.

 

Dip, dip and swing her back,

Flashing with silver,

Swift as the wild goose flies,

Dip, dip and swing,

Dip, dip and swing,

Dip, dip and swing.

 


 

 

Chain, chain, daisy chain 🔊

 

 


This round would also make a lovely simple circle game out on the grass, even more fun for young children if they first make a necklace wristlet or coronet of daisies – the youngest might need considerable help!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chain, chain, daisy chain.

All the pretty flowers,

One for you, and one for me,

And one for Jenny Bowers.

 


 

 

Come follow O

 

A traditional three part call and response round. Words and music by John Hilton (17th century).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Come, follow, follow, follow,

Follow, follow, follow me.

 

Whither shall I follow, follow, follow,

Whither shall I follow, follow thee.

 

To the greenwood, to the greenwood,

To the greenwood, greenwood tree.

 


 

 

Early in the morning / Kum bachur atzeil 🔊

 

 


A folk song from Israel and a three part round.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Early in the morning, arising with the sun,

Early in the morning, arising with the sun.

Crow, rooster, the day has now begun,

Crow, rooster, the day has now begun.

Kukuriku, kukuriku, work for everyone,

Kukuriku, kukuriku, work for everyone.

 


 

 

Grasshoppers three O

 

This cheerful song can be sung as a round.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Grasshoppers three a-fiddling went,

Hey! Ho! Never be still.

They paid no money toward their rent,

But all day long with elbow bent,

They fiddled a tune called rillaby, rillaby,

Fiddled a tune called rillaby rill,

They fiddled a tune called rillaby, rillaby,

Fiddled a tune called rillaby rill.

 


 

 

Hey, ho, nobody home 🔊

 

 


This Yuletide round can be sung with partner songs "Rose Rose" and "Ah Poor Bird" to make a three part harmony. Find out more about this canon and Thomas Ravenscroft at: http://www.music4education.com/resources/canon/heyhonobodyhome.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hey, ho, nobody home.

Meat nor drink nor money have I none,

Yet we will be merry, very merry.

Hey, ho, nobody home.

Meat nor drink nor money have I none,

Yet we will be merry, very merry.

Hey, ho, nobody home.

Hey, ho, nobody home.


 

Ifca’s castle O

 

A round from Czechoslovakia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Above the valley fresh and green,

A young boy’s head is plainly seen;

Hi-ya hi-ya hi-ya ha,

Tumbling goes the river,

Hi-ya hi-ya hi-ya ha,

Tumbling goes the stream.

 

But no it’s not a young boy’s head,

It’s Ifca’s castle there instead.

Hi-ya hi-ya hi-ya ha,

Tumbling goes the river,

Hi-ya hi-ya hi-ya ha,

Tumbling goes the stream.

 


 

 

Mr. Moon, Mr. Moon / Cuckoo! 🔊

 

 


These two partner songs can separately or in unison.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mr. Moon, Mr. Moon,

You're out too soon,

The sun is still in the sky.

Go back into your bed

And cover up your head

And wait ‘til the day goes by.

 

'Twas on a summer's evening

I walked the forest through.

When suddenly I heard it

A soft and sweet cuckoo.

Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Cuckoo!

Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Cuckoo!

 


 

 

 

Morning song O

 

This traditional Native American song was published in Singing Together, Summer 1961, BBC Publications.

Just the first verse is normally sung as a round.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Morning is come,

Night is away;

Rise with the sun

And welcome the day.

 

Birdies and flowers,

Beasties and men;

Rise with the sun

And join in the ring.

 


 

 

Now all the woods are waking 🔊

 

 


Can be sung as a four parter round. From ‘Very favourites of the very young’ by the Co-operative Recreation Service published in 1986.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Now all the woods are waking,

The sun is rising high!

Wake up, now! Get up, now!

Before the dew is dry!

Now all the birds are chirping,

The air is full of song.

Wake up, now! Get up, now!

And join the happy throng.

 


 

 

 

 

One bottle pop!O

 

A good song for a topic on recycling.

It works well as a round.

 

 

Directions:

Put up thumbs and fingers one at a time.

Rub tummy.

Throw thumbs over shoulders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Peace round – The scarlet rose 🔊

 

 


A hopeful song and three part round.

Author unknown; I have not been able to find the source of this song but it appears to be inspired by the prayer card often used as an epitaph : “Out of darkness shall come dawn, out of winter shall come spring, out of striving shall come peace, not by our power, but by the power of God.” which was possibly written by Saint Nazianz, October 1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Out of darkness shall come dawn,

In the spring of winter the seeds,

And the seed there grows the scarlet rose,

Out of striving, ways for peace.

 


 

 

Round and round the earth is turning 🔊

 

 


Sing as the world turns and the seasons change.

A traditional round that can also be sung as a lullaby. I have added a second verse courtesy of Mudcat and also my own chord arrangement but if you wish to sing it as a round you can omit these.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Round and round the Earth is turning,

Turning always round to morning,

And from morning round to night.

 

Round and round the Year is turning,

Turning always round to darkness,

And from darkness round to light.

 


 

 

 

Sweetly sings the donkey O

 

Children will love making the donkey noises. Make up more verses of other animals and the sounds they might make to get their first meal.

Sing as a round or accompanied by chime bars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sweetly sings the donkey,

At the break of day,

If you do not feed him,

This is what he’ll say:

Hee haw! Hee haw! Hee haw! Hee haw! Hee haw! Hee haw!

Hee haw! Hee haw! Hee haw! Hee haw! Hee haw! Hee haw!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

The frog in the bog O

 

 


A sad, sad song by Gertrude Mander and Harvey Worthington Loomis.

This can be played as a round.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There once was a frog who lived in a bog

And played a fiddle in the middle of a puddle,

What a muddle! Better go round!

Better go round!

 

His music was short for soon he was caught

And now in the middle of the griddle he is frying,

And he's crying, "Rather be drowned.

Rather be drowned."

 


 

 

The little bells of Westminster O

(The little bells at Christmas time)

 

 


A simple bell round is about the smallest bell that rings at London’s Houses of Parliament. I have used the Christmas version from my early days of teaching.

 

Young children can sit opposite each other in pairs and gently rock back and forth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The little bells of Westminster go ding, dang, ding, dang dong.

The little bells of Westminster go ding, dang dong.

 

The little bells at Christmas time go ding, dang, ding, dang dong.

The little bells at Christmas time go ding, dang dong.

 

 


 

Thirty days hath September O

 

This mnemonic can also be sung as a round.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Thirty days hath September,

April, June, and November,

All the rest have thirty one,

Saving February all alone,

Which has twenty eight, rain or shine,

And on leap years, twenty nine.


 

 

Two ducks on a pond 🔊

 

 


This three part round comes from ‘The Ditty Bag’ compiled by Janet E’ Tobitt published 1946. It is also fun to sing as it is or to move in a wibbley wobbley way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Two ducks on a pond,

Wibble wobble, wibble wobble,

Two ducks on a pond,

Wibble wobble, wibble wobble,

Two old ladies going to market,

Wibbily wibbily wobble, wibbily wibbily wobble.

 


 

 

Where is John? O

 

Another round from Czechoslovakia based on a melody by Frederick Smetana from the opening chorus of The Bartered Bride.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Where is John?

The old grey hen has left her pen,

Oh, where is John?

The cows are in the corn again,

Oh, John!

 


 

 

 

Whippoorwill 🔊

 

 


An evening song for 9-10 year olds. This is traditionally a three part round.

 

Hear the round and find out more about this night bird which is found widely throughout North and Central America at: https://www.musick8.com/html/current_tune.php?songorder=12&numbering=119

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Gone to bed is the setting sun,

Night is coming and day is done;

Whippoorwill, whippoorwill,

Has just begun.

 


 

White coral bells O

 

A traditional round that has been popular in the Girl Guiding movement.

Find more about its origins and provenance at:

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=37342

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


White coral bells upon a slender stalk,

Lilies of the valley deck my garden walk.

Oh, don't you wish that you could hear them ring?

That will happen only when the fairies sing.

 


 

 

Whose pigs are these? O

 

Sing just the first verse as a round or all of it as a rhyming song; make up more verses about other animals.

 

Find out more about this song and other versions at:

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35690

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Whose pigs are these?

Whose pigs are these?

They are John Cook's,

I can tell’m by their looks,

And they live in the vicarage garden.

 

…They are John Pott's,

I can tell’m by their spots…

 

…They are Bill Spear's,

I can tell’m by their ears…

 

…They are Sally Dale's,

I can tell’m by their tails…

 

…They are Farmer Hunt's,

I can tell’m by their grunts…

 

…They are Geoff Potter's,

I can tell’m by their trotters…

 

What's their disease?

What's their disease?

They've got the pox,

I can tell by the spots,

And they live in the vicarage garden.

 

 

 


 

Why doesn’t my goose? O

 

This song makes a great round. It is even more fun performed with actions.

 

1. Throw out hands and point to self

2.  Wiggle fingers from side to side – point to neighbour

3.  Fold arms, stand up on tiptoes.

4. Hands on hips point to neighbour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why doesn't my goose,

Sing as much as thy goose,

When I paid for my goose,

Twice as much as thine?

 

Why doesn't my goose,

Lay as much as thy goose,

When I paid for my goose,

Twice as much as thine?

 

Why doesn't my goose,

Fly as much as thy goose,

When I paid for my goose,

Twice as much as thine?

 

 

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