Song cupboard T (b3)

The purple bamboo

The sweet nightingale

There ain’t no bugs on me

There was a good old woman

There was a man and he was mad

There were three jolly fishermen

There once was a sow

There’s a fox in a box

There was a monkey

There’s a hole in my bucket

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea

There’s a little wheel a-turning

There’s a sun for the morning

There’s someone living on a big high hill

There was a big fish

This little light of mine

Three jolly rogues of Lynn

Three men went a-hunting

Tiptoe, tiptoe dinosaur

Tozie Mozie

Treading the water wheel

Tumbalalaika

Turn on the sun

Last updated: 9/4/2018 4:28 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we go

compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

Return to the ‘Singing games for children’ home page

To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

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·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

The purple bamboo 🔊

 

 


Ready for the Chinese New Year.

A Chinese folk song popular south of the Yangtze River.

It comes from the pentatonic song book ‘Just five’ published in 1972.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


See, I bring to you purple bamboo shoot,

Now 'twill make a lovely flute;

But those lips so small

Cannot play at all

On a lovely golden flute.

 

Chorus

Ee-tee-tee,

Soon will come the happy day,

Ee-tee-tee,

Soon will come the happy day,

My friend the flute will play.

 

You must try and grow like the bamboo tall,

Then those parting lips so small

Soon will play the flute

Made from bamboo shoot;

Silv’ry tunes will gently fall.


 

 

The sweet nightingale 🔊

 

 


The school standard version can be found in BBC School’s Time And Tune, Summer 1958. This one however is based on the version recorded by Margaret Chrystal, T. Bikel, C. Gooding as I rather like the extra bird verses. Find out more at : https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=161744

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My sweetheart come along!

Don't you hear the fond song?

The sweet notes of the nightingale flow?

Don’t you hear the fond tale

Of the sweet nightingale,

As she sings in the valley below,

As she sings in the valley below.

 

Pretty Betsy, don't fail,

For I'll carry your pail,

Safe home to your cottage we'll go;

You shall hear the fond tale

Of the sweet nightingale,

As she sings in the valley below....

 

Come sit yourself down

With me on the ground,

On the banks where the primroses grow;

You shall hear the fond tale

Of the sweet nightingale,

As she sings in the valley below....

 

Down in yonder grove,

There is an alcove,

And violets around it do spring;

Just by in a bush,

There sits a song thrush,

'Twill charm you to hear how she sings....

 

Why hark, my love, hark,

Why yonder's a lark,

She warbles and pleases me so;

That the beautiful tale

Of the sweet nightingale,

Will never entice me to go....


 

 

There ain’t no bugs on me 🔊

 

 


This humourous nonsense song was recorded in1928 by Fiddlin’ John Carson. The verses like the last line often go on ad infinitum and have many in common with other songs such as ‘It ain’t gonna rain no more’ which with a dance can be found on my website: http://www.singinggamesforchildren.com/A%20Cluster%202.2%20Awaywego/9%20Aint%20it%20great%20to%20be%20crazy%20w.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chorus:

There ain’t no bugs on me,

There ain’t no bugs on me,

There may be bugs on some of you mugs,

But there ain’t no bugs on me.

 

Well, the Juney bug comes in the month of June,

The lightning bug comes in May,

Bed bug comes just any old time,

But, they’re not going to stay.

 

Well, a bull frog sittin’ on a lily pad,

Looking up at the sky,

The lily pad broke and the frog fell in,

He got water all in his eye…ball.

Chorus

 

Mosquito he fly high,

Mosquito he fly low,

If old mosquito lands on me,

He ain’t a gonna fly no mo’.

 

We had a cat down on our farm,

It had a ball of yarn,

When those little cats were born,

They all had sweaters on.

Chorus

 

As I went walking through the woods,

Humming a tune so gaily,

The wind came whistling through the trees,

And froze my ukelele.

 

Well little bugs have littler bugs,

Up on their backs to bite ’em,

And the littler bugs have still littler bugs,

And so on ad infinitum.

Chorus


 

 

There was a good old woman O

 

 


A French-Canadian folk song, ‘En allant au marché’  which comes from ‘Vieilles chansons de Nouvele-France’.

By adding the last line of the previous verse each time the song is sung it can be sung cumulatively.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a good old woman to market on her way.

The basket on her head was full of eggs that day.

But suddenly the eggs fell out

And they went rolling all about,

The eggs went rolling, rolling, rolling all about.

 

…ducks… …quacking…

…hens… …clucking…

…pigs… …squealing…

…turkeys… …gobbling…


 

 

There was a man and he was mad O

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a man and he was mad,

And he jumped into the pudding bag!

 

The pudding bag, it was so fine,

That he jumped into a bottle of wine.

 

The bottle of wine, it was so clear,

He jumped into a bottle of beer.

 

The bottle of beer, it was so thick,

He jumped onto a walking stick.

 

The walking stick, it was so narrow,

That he jumped into a wheelbarrow.

 

The wheelbarrow began to crack,

He jumped onto a horse's back.

 

The horse's back began to break,

So, he jumped into a chocolate cake.

 

The chocolate cake became so rotten,

That he jumped into a bag of cotton.

 

The bag of cotton caught on fire

And blew him up to Jeremiah.

Spoken: Pouf! Pouf! Pouf!


 

 

There was a monkey O

 

 


This nursery rhyme can be found in print, in a shorter version, as early as 1626

Find out more at: http://www.rhymes.org.uk/a93-there-was-a-monkey.htm

The version below came from BBC Broadcast to schools, Time and tune Autumn1960.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a monkey climbed up a tree,

When he fell down, then down fell he.

 

There was a crow sat on a stone,

When he was gone, then there was none.

 

There was an old wife did eat an apple,

When she had eaten two, she had eaten a couple.

 

There was a horse going to the mill,

When he went on, he stood not still.

 

There was a butcher cut his thumb,

When it did bleed, then blood did come.

 

There was a lackey ran a race,

When he ran fast, he ran apace.

 

There was a cobbler clouting shoon*,

When they were mended, they were done.

 

There was a chandler making candle,

When he them stripped, he did them handle.

 

There was a navy went to Spain,

When it returned, it came again.

 


 

 

 

There were three jolly fishermen O

 

 


This is a popular song in the scouting movement especially

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There were three jolly fishermen,

There were three jolly fishermen,

Fisher, fishermen, men, men,

Fisher, fishermen, men, men,

There were three jolly fishermen.

 

The first one's name was Abraham,

The first one's name was Abraham,

Abra, Abraham ham, ham…

 

The second one's name was I-I-saac,

The second one's name was I-I-saac,

I-I, I-Isaac saac, saac...

 

The third on'e name was Ja-a-cob,

The third on'e name was Ja-a-cob,

Ja-a, Ja-acob, cob, cob...

 

They all went down to Jericho,

They all went down to Jericho,

Jer-i, Jer-icho, cho, cho…

 

They should have gone to Amsterdam,

They should have gone to Amsterdam,

Amster, Amster, Shh! Shh! Shh!

Amster, Amster, Shh! Shh! Shh!,

You shouldn't say that naughty word!


 

 

There once was a sow O

 

A very sad pig tale!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There once was a sow who had three little pigs,

Three little piggies had she.

The old sow always went, “Oink oink oink!”

And the piggies went, Wee wee wee-ee-ee!”

 

One day one of these three little pigs,

To the other two piggies said she,

‘Why don’t we always go, “Oink oink oink!”

It’s so childish to go, “Wee wee wee-ee-ee!”

 

These three piggies grew skinny and lean,

Skinny they well should be.

For they always would try to go, “Oink oink oink!”

When they should have gone, “Wee wee wee-ee-ee!”

 

These three little piggies they up and they died,

A very sad sight to see.

So don’t ever try to go, “Oink oink oink!”

When you ought to go, “Wee wee wee-ee-ee!”

 


 

 

There’s a fox in a box O

 

This song by Barbara Ireson has been adapted many times in my classrooms and is there for adapting to your particular topic; the tune too has changed over the years, many apologies Barbara.

The main objectives are to make up rhymes and of course have lots of fun while doing so.

 

 

 

 

 


There’s a fox in a box in my little bed,

My little bed, my little bed,

There’s a fox in a box in my little bed,

And there isn’t much room for me.

 

There’s a snake in a cake in my little bed…

 

There’s a giraffe in a scarf in my little bed…

 

There’s a rat in a hat in my little bed…

 

There’s a goat in a coat in my little bed…

 

There’s a stag in a bag in my little bed…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

There’s a hole in my bucket O

 

 


A circular song.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza,

There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, a hole.

Then mend it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Then mend it dear Henry, dear Henry, mend it.

 

With what shall I mend it, dear Liza, dear Liza?

With what shall I mend it, dear Liza, with what?

With straw, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

With straw, dear Henry, dear Henry, a straw.

 

But the straw is too long, dear Liza, dear Liza,

But the straw is too long, dear Liza, too long.

Then cut it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Then cut it, dear Henry, dear Henry, cut it.

 

With what shall I cut it, dear Liza, dear Liza?

With what shall I cut it, dear Liza, with what?

With an axe, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry’

With an axe, dear Henry, dear Henry, an axe.

 

But the axe is too dull, dear Liza, dear Liza,

But the axe is too dull, dear Liza, too dull.

Then sharpen it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Then sharpen it, dear Henry, dear Henry, sharpen it.

 

With what shall I sharpen it, dear Liza, dear Liza?

With what shall I sharpen it, dear Liza, with what?

With a stone, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

With a stone, dear Henry, dear Henry, a stone.

 

But the stone is too dry, dear Liza, dear Liza,

But the stone is too dry, dear Liza, too dry.

Well, wet it, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Well, wet it, dear Henry, dear Henry, wet it.

 

With what shall I wet it, dear Liza, dear Liza?

With what shall I wet it, dear Liza, with what?

Try water, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

Try water, dear Henry, dear Henry, water.

 

With what shall I fetch it, dear Liza, dear Liza?

With what shall I fetch it, dear Liza, in what?

In a bucket, dear Henry, dear Henry, dear Henry,

In a bucket, dear Henry, dear Henry, the bucket.

 

But there’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, dear Liza,

There’s a hole in my bucket, dear Liza, a hole!

 


 

 

 

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea O

 

 


A cumulative song. Make it longer by ‘a hair on the wart’ or add anything crazy such as an elephant on the flea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a hole, there’s a hole,

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea.

 

There’s a log in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a log in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a hole, there’s a hole,

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea.

 

There’s a bump on the log in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a bump on the log in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a hole, there’s a hole,

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea.

 

There’s a frog on the bump, on the log, in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a frog on the bump, on the log, in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a hole, there’s a hole,

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea.

 

There’s a wart on the frog, on the bump, on the log, in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a wart on the frog, on the bump, on the log, in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a hole, there’s a hole,

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea.

 

There’s a fly on the wart, on the frog, on the bump, on the log, in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a fly on the wart, on the frog, on the bump, on the log, in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a hole, there’s a hole,

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea.

 

There’s a flea on the fly, on the wart, on the frog, on the bump, on the log, in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a flea on the fly, on the wart, on the frog, on the bump, on the log, in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a hole, there’s a hole,

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea.

 

There’s a smile on the flea, on the fly, on the wart, on the frog, on the bump, on the log, in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a smile on the flea, on the fly, on the wart, on the frog, on the bump, on the log, in the hole in the bottom of the sea,

There’s a hole, there’s a hole,

There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea.

 


 

 

 

There’s a little wheel a-turning O

 

 


A song from Alabama.

 

1. Roll arms, cross hands and place on heart (do this each time). 2. Play guitar

3. Make hand move in waves. 4. Make circle with forefingers and thumbs wiggle fingers towards heart 5. Forefinger draws a smile.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There's a little wheel a-turning in my heart,

There's a little wheel a-turning in my heart,

In my heart, in my heart,

There's a little wheel a-turning in my heart.

 

There's a little song a singing in my heart...

There's a little guitar playing in my heart...

There’s a little breeze a-blowing in my heart…

There’s a little moonbeam shining in my heart…

Oh I feel so very happy in my heart...

 


 

 

 

There’s a sun for the morning 🔊

 

 


Written by Charles Ellerton the second verse of this hymn has been adapted by Dany Rosevear to reflect a more secular age. Find the religious verses at: http://www.kididdles.com/lyrics/g069.html.

The music is attributed to W.A. Mozart.

 

1. Draw a large circle. 2. Put hands to cheek. 3. Hide face. 4. Make fingers flash in and out. 5. Throw hands out. 6.Draw hands down from on high. 7.Hold hands out. 8.Cross hands to cover heart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There's a sun for the morning,

And a moon for the night;

When the moon hides her face,

Still the stars twinkle bright.

When the moon hides her face,

Still the stars twinkle bright.

 

Love and joy, light and beauty,

Shine down from high above,

Just as we spread gifts of kindness

From hearts full of love.

Just as we spread gifts of kindness

From hearts full of love.

 

 


 

 

 

 

There’s someone living on a big, high hill O

 

 


Sing high and low with this echo song by Henrietta Clark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There’s someone living on a high, high hill,

I wonder who it could be.

There’s someone living on a high, high hill

Who always answers me.

 

Yoo hoo! Yoo hoo!

S/he always answers me!

Yoo hoo! Yoo hoo!

S/he always answers me!

 


 

 

There was a big fish 🔊

 

 


You may also recognise this as ‘Shanghai chicken’ but this one is all about Jonah.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a big fish and his name was Whale,

A few days and a few days.

Swallowed Jonah head and tail, and I’m going home.

I've got a home up yonder, a few days and a few days.

I've got a home up yonder; and I'm going home.

 

Swam the ocean 'round and 'round,

A few days and a few days.

Spewed out Jonah on dry ground, and I’m going home.

I've got a home up yonder, a few days and a few days.

I've got a home up yonder; and I'm going home.

 

Going home in a little while, a few days and a few days.

When I do, I hope you'll smile, 'cause I’m going home.

I've got a home up yonder, a few days and a few days.

I've got a home up yonder; and I'm going home.


 

 

 

This little light of mine 🔊

 

 


A gospel song.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


This little light of mine, I'm gonna let it shine,

This little light of mine, I'm gonna let it shine,

This little light of mine, I'm gonna let it shine,

Let it shine, let it shine, let it shine!

 

Everywhere I go, I'm gonna let it shine...

 

Each and every day…

 

All around the world...

 

All through the night, the stars are gonna shine, x2

And like those little lights, I’m gonna let it shine …


 

 

 

 

Three jolly rogues of LynnO

 

 


There are many versions of the words to this song but the tune appears to be fairly constant. The first two lines of this one suggest an U.S.A. origin.

Find out more at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=19722

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


In good King Arthur’s days,

When we served under the king,

Lived a miller and a weaver and a little tailor,

Three jolly rogues of Lynn.

 

Three jolly rogues of Lynn,

Three jolly rogues of Lynn,

Lived a miller and a weaver and a little tailor,

Three jolly rogues of Lynn.

 

Now the miller he stole corn,

And the weaver he stole yarn,

And the little tailor he stole broadcloth

To keep those three rogues warm…

 

Chorus as before

 

Now the miller was drowned in his dam,

The weaver was hung in his yarn,

And the Devil clapped claws on the little tailor

With the broadcloth under his arm…

 

Now the miller still floats in his dam,

The weaver still hangs in his yarn,

And the little tailor goes skipping through the fire

With the broadcloth under his arm…

 


 

 

 

Three men went a-hunting O

 

 


This version of the song with the exception of the third verse is from Devon in the UK and is from the singing of Charlie Hill, a farmer; the chorus however was collected from The Endacott family and recorded by Cyril Tawney– it’s a big county and words and music changed as it moved from one place to another – Chinese whispers!g!

There are many other versions heard around the country including ‘Six Jovial Welshmen’ and ‘There were three jovial huntsmen’. Find out more at: https://mainlynorfolk.info/lloyd/songs/threedrunkenhuntsmen.html .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three men went a-hunting, but nothing could they find,

Except a great big haystack and that they left behind.

The Englishman said, ‘A haystack,’

The Scotsman he said, ‘Nay!’

Paddy said, ‘It's an elephant with the trunk all blown away.’

 

Chorus:

And it's hunting, we will go, will go, will go,

And it's hunting we will go.

 

Three men went a-hunting, but nothing could they find,

Except a great big hedgehog and that they left behind.

The Englishman said, ‘A hedgehog,’

The Scotsman he said, ‘Nay!’

Paddy said, ‘It's a pincushion with the pins stuck in the wrong way.’

 

Three men went a-hunting, but nothing could they find,

Except a natterjack toad and that they left behind.

The Englishman said, ‘A toad,’

The Scotsman he said, ‘Nay!’

Paddy said, ‘It's grandma's duck with the feathers all blown away.’

 

Three men went a-hunting, but nothing could they find,

Except a great black pig and that they left behind.

The Englishman said, ‘A black pig,’

The Scotsman he said, ‘Nay!’

Paddy said, ‘It's the devil himself, so all three ran away!’

 


 

 

Tiptoe, tiptoe dinosaur 🔊

 

 


A little song for big movements!

Carnivore or herbivore? Each dinosaur is different in looks, movement and diet.

The correct pronounciation of diplodocus is 'dip-lod-ic-uss' though the pronunciation used in verse two is an accepted common one.

 

Verse 1. Walk on tip toes. Make claws out of hands and stomp feet.. Shrug shoulders Walk on tip toes. Verse 2. Move slowly with a heavy plod. Make arms into a long neck and tail. Stretch arms apart. Verse 3. Stretch arms out and fly. Verse 4. Move with a heavy tread. Open and close jaws with arms extended.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tiptoe, tiptoe dinosaur,

You're so big you'll break the floor.

Great big claws and great big feet.

Do you eat plants or meat?

Tiptoe, tiptoe dinosaur,

You're so big you'll break the floor!

 

Plod, plod, plod, I’m diplodocus,

I eat plants, I’m not ferocious!

Great long neck and a long, long tail

But shorter than the great blue whale;

Plod, plod, plod, I’m diplodocus,

I eat plants, I’m not ferocious!

 

Flap, flap, flap, pteranodon,

With a wingspan metres long.

I soar and glide so swift and free,

I eat creatures of the sea.

Flap, flap, flap, pteranodon,

With a wingspan metres long.

 

Stomp, stomp, stomp, tyrannosaurus,

King of all the dinosaurus.

Great big jaws and great sharp teeth,

Watch out children I eat meat! GRRRH!

Stomp, stomp, stomp, tyrannosaurus,

King of all the dinosaurus!

 

 


 

 

 

Tozie Mozie O

 

 


These first two nonsense verses were collected from the Orkney Islands off the northern tip of Scotland from a song called ‘The bretheren three’ and are associated with the custom of hunting the wren.  http://www.pearl.celtscot.ed.ac.uk/Samples/08-233/08-233.html

 

A perfect song for a walk in the woods. Encourage children to make up their own verses as they explore the wooded environment; I have added three verses as suggestions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


“Come to the wood,” says Tozie Mozie,

“Come to the wood,” says Johnnie Red Nosie

“Come to the wood,” says brithers and three,

“Come to the wood,” says Wise Willie

 

“What to do there?” says Tozie Mozie,

“What to do there?” says Johnnie Red Nosie

“What to do there?” says brithers and three,

“What to do there?” says Wise Willie

 

We’ll dance round an oak tree…

We’ll pick up the acorns…

We’ll skip through the bluebells…

 


 

 

 

Treading the water wheel 🔊

 

 


Rice fields are thirsty for water and have been irrigated this way for centuries.

This Chinese work song was translated into English by Maryette Lum for ‘Music near and far’ bk. 4 and published in 1956. The words here have been adapted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tread wheel, tread wheel,

Quickly tread the wheel.

Fields must not be dry,

Or the crops will die.

Tread wheel, tread wheel,

All must tread the wheel.

Feet must never stop,

Or we’ll lose the crop.

 

Left, right, left, right,

In the paddy fields;

Work in every weather,

Tread and turn together.

Left, right, left, right,

In the paddy fields;

Treading one by one,

Til the day is done.

 

Left, right, left, right,

In the paddy fields;

We must never stop,

If we want a crop

Slow wheel, slow wheel,

In the paddy fields;

Growing time is done,

There’ll be rice for everyone.

 

 


 

 

Tumbalalaika 🔊

 

 


A Yiddish riddle song from Russia. Find out more at: http://www.talesfromthekeyboard.com/songs-of-exiles/1-tumbalalaika

It was a favourite sung with international friends on voluntary work camps in Poland, Turkey and Finland where I travelled with my guitar in the late 1960s.

This version comes from the ‘Hootenanny Songbook’ published in 1963.

The English translation has been adapted by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Shteht a bocher, under tracht,

Tracht und tracht die gantze nacht.

Vemen tsu nehmen ohn nit far schemen,

Vemen tsu nehmen ohn nit far schemen?

Chorus:

Tumbala, tumbala, tumbalalaika,

Tumbala, tumbala, tumbalalaika,

Tumbalalaika, shpiel balalaika.

Tumbalalaika, freylach zol zain.

 

A young lad is thinking all the night through,

Thinking, thinking, what should he do?

Whom should he marry, one wise and true,

Who’d answer his questions and cleverly too!

 

Maiden, maiden, can you explain,

What can grow and never need rain,

What can burn for years and years,

What can yearn and cry without tears?

 

Foolish young lad, why don’t you know?

A stone without rain can surely grow,

Love can burn for years and years,

And the heart can yearn and cry without tears.

 


 

 

Turn on the sun 🔊

 

 


Make ready for the good times! A lively rhythm with syncopation.

A song by Mitch Murray and Peter Callander and made famous by Nana Mouskouri.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chorus 1 x2

Turn on the sun, turn on the sun,

Light up the world, come everyone.

Turn off the wind, thunder and rain,

Turn on the sun, let's smile again.

 

Thinker, tailor man,

Radiate all the love you can.

Lawyer, engineer,

Let your heart be a pioneer.

 

Interlude

Gather up all the goodness in you,

Turn on the sun, turn on the sun.

What a world when we all begin to

Turn on the sun and smile again.

 

Chorus 2

Turn on the sun, turn on the sun,

Open the doors, tell everyone.

Bad times are out, good times are in,

Turn on the sun, let's smile again.

 

Miner, steeple-jack,

Warm emotions are coming back.

Sailor, stevedore,

Here's a message you can't ignore.

Chorus 1    Lalala la…   Chorus 2

 


 

 

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