Song cupboard T1

The bell cow

The blacksmith / Twankdillo

The birch tree (Beriozka)

The bird courting song

The carrion crow

The cockle gatherer

The cuckoo / Peter’s flowing stream

The Derby ram

The frog and the crow

The frog and the mouse

The Golden Vanity

The grey hawk

The gypsy rover

The jackfish

The keeper

The lambs in the green fields

The lion is king of the jungle

The lost pony

The merry green fields of the lowland

Last updated: 9/18/2018 3:01 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we go

compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

Return to the ‘Singing games for children’ home page

To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

The bell cow 🔊

 

 

 


From ‘American Mountain Songs’ published 1927 and usually heard with a banjo accompaniament. The bell cow is usually the leader of the herd; the bell she wears serves to keep her charges from straying too far.

Visit: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=103143  for more verses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Partridge in the pea patch, pickin' up the peas,

Along comes the bell cow, kickin' up her heels!

Chorus:

Oh, the bell cow, catch her by the tail,

Oh, the bell cow, milk her in the pail!

 

The bell cow has a couple a horns,

Ain’t been milked since I was born.

 

Went down the cornfield to pick a mess of beans,

Along come the bell cow a-pecking at the greens.

 

The milk ain't whipped and the butter ain't fat,

The darned old cow ate my best hat.

 

Some of these days when I learn how,

I'm gonna milk that old bell cow.

 


 

 

 

The blacksmith / Twankydillo 🔊

 

 


A traditional English folk song. This children’s version comes from ‘Music Now and Long Ago’ published 1956 by the Silver Burdett Company.

Another version can be found in ‘Singing Together’ Spring 1969, BBC Publications.

Find out more about this song at:   https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/twankydillo.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Here's a song for the jolly blacksmith,

The best of all fellows,

He works at his anvil

While the boy blows the bellows

Which makes his bright hammer

To rise and to fall.

Here's to old Cole, and to young Cole

And to old Cole of all.

Twankydillo, twankydillo

Twankydillo, dillo, dillo, dillo,

And a roaring pair of bagpipes

Made of the green willow.

 

Here's a song for the jolly blacksmith,

He’s clever, indeed.

He shapes every horseshoe

To a fit for each steed.

He makes his bright hammer….

 

Here's a song for the jolly blacksmith,

He’s handy besides,

He rims wheels for wagons,

So that we can have rides.

And he makes his bright hammer….

 


 

 

 

The birch tree (Beriozka) O

 

 


A beautiful old Russian folk song.

There are many translations of this song and you can find some more at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=60360

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


See the lovely birch in the meadow,

See the leaves a-dancing when the wind blows.

Loo-lee-loo, in the meadow,

Loo-lee-loo, when the wind blows.

 

I will take three twigs from the birch tree,

I will carve three flutes from its branches.

Loo-lee-loo, from the birch tree,

Loo-lee-loo, from its branches.

 

Then for my old grandfather’s pleasure,

From the birch I’ll make a balalaika

Loo-lee-loo, for his pleasure,

Loo-lee-loo, balalaika.

 

As I play my tingling balalaika,

I will think of you, my lovely birch tree.

Loo-lee-loo, balalaika,

Loo-lee-loo, lovely birch tree.


 

 

The bird courting song O

 

There are many more verses to this song about courting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


"Hi!" said the blackbird, sitting on a chair,

"Once I courted a lady fair,

She proved fickle and turned her back,

And ever since then I've dressed in black."

Chorus:

Howdy dowdy diddle-um-dum,

Howdy dowdy diddle-um-day,

Howdy dowdy diddle-um-dum,

Howdy dowdy diddle-um-day.

 

"Hi!" said the blue jay and away he flew,

"If I were a young man I'd have two;

If one proved fickle and chanced to go,

I'd have another string to my bow."

 

"Hi!" said the little leather-winged bat,

"I will tell you the reason that,

The reason that I fly by night,

Is because I lost my heart's delight."

 

"Hi!" said the robin, with a little squirm,

"I wish I had a great big worm;

I’d fly away into my nest;

I have a wife I think is best."

 


 

 

The carrion crow 🔊

 

 

 


There are many versions of this traditional song, find some of them here:  https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=98836 . The one below I heard from the singing of Cyril Tawney, ‘Children’s songs from Devon and Cornwall’. It was also in English Folk Songs for Schools collected and arranged by S.Baring Gould and Cecil Sharp, published 1900. It was taken down from a Cornishman in 1844.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A carrion crow sat on an oak,

Hey, derry down, derry dido!

Watching a tailor mending his coat;

Caw! Caw! the carrion crow,

Hey, derry down, derry dido!

 

Oh, wife, oh wife bring here my bow;

Hey, derry down, derry dido!

That I may shoot this carrion crow;

Caw! Caw! the carrion crow,

Hey, derry down, derry dido!

 

The tailor he fired but he missed his mark;

Hey, derry down, derry dido!

For he shot his old sow right bang through the heart;

Caw! Caw! the carrion crow,

Hey, derry down, derry dido!

 

Oh, wife, oh wife, bring some brandy in a spoon;

Hey, derry down, derry dido!

For our old sow’s fallen down in a swoon;

Caw! Caw! the carrion crow,

Hey, derry down, derry dido!

 

Well, the old sow died and the bell did toll;

Hey, derry down, derry dido!

And the little pigs prayed for the old sow's soul;

Caw! Caw! the carrion crow,

Hey, derry down, derry dido!


 

 

 

The cockle gatherer O

 

A song from the Hebrides made famous by Kenneth McKellar. I came across it on the BBC radio programme Music Box in the 1980s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Eetia doo veel,

Eetia a doo horo,

Eetia doo veel,

Blythe I gather cockles here,

Eetia doo veel,

Eetia a doo horo,

Eetia doo veel,

Blythe I gather cockles here.

 

High scream the seagulls

Down on the skerry there,

High scream the seagulls

While I gather cockles here,

High scream the seagulls

Down on the skerry there,

High scream the seagulls

While I gather cockles here.

Eetia doo veel,

Eetia a doo horo,

Eetia doo veel,

While I gather cockles here etc.

 

Laughter of sea-waves

Down on the skerry there,

Laughter of sea-waves

While I gather cockles here.

Laughter of sea-waves

Down on the skerry there,

Laughter of sea-waves

While I gather cockles here.

Eetia doo veel,

Eetia a doo horo,

Eetia doo veel,

While I gather cockles here.

Eetia doo veel,

Eetia a doo horo,

Eetia doo veel,

Still I gather cockles here.

 

 


 

 

The  cuckoo / Peter’s flowing stream 🔊

 

 


A community song of German origin; there are more complex versions of this song, find out more at: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=102225.

 

Slap knees rapidly for ‘Hol-di-ah’ then slap knees, clap hands and snap fingers continuously until the end of the chorus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, I went to the flowing stream and what did I hear?

From the quiet wood came the sound of the cuckoo so clear.

 

Chorus: Hol-di-ah,

Hol-di-rah-kiki-ah, hol-di rah cuckoo, (cuckoo)

Hol-di-rah-kiki-ah, hol-di rah cuckoo, (cuckoo)

Hol-di-rah-kiki-ah, hol-di rah cuckoo, (cuckoo)

Hol-di-rah-kiki-ah, oh!

 

After Easter comes sunny days that will melt all the snow.

Then I’ll marry my maiden fair, we’ll be happy I know.

Chorus (add a second ‘cuckoo’)


 

 

The  Derby Ram 🔊

 

 


There are innumerable versions of this hoary old tale; this lesser known one comes from Toni Arthur’s ‘Everyday Singaway’ (Piccolo) published 1985. There are no clues to its earlier origins, just a note that says ‘English traditional’. The version below has some minor changes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


As I was going to Derby,

All on a market day,

I saw the largest ram, sir,

That ever was fed on hay.

 

Singing Hey dingle Derby,

And hey dingle day,

Hey dingle Derby,

And hey dingle day.

 

The fleece upon this ram, sir,

It reached up to the sky,

The eagles made their nests there,

You could hear the young 'uns cry.

 

The horns upon this ram, sir,

They reached up to the moon,

A lad went up in January

And he didn't come back 'til June.

 

And all the boys of Derby

Came a-begging for his eyes,

To kick around the streets, sir,

For they were football size.

 

The tail upon this ram, sir,

It reached right down to hell,

And every time he waggled it

He rang the devil’s bell.

 

And now my story’s ended,

I've got no more to say,

So please give us a New Year’s Box

And we'll be on our way.


 

 

 

The frog and the crow O

 

 


Beware of the handsome and persuasive stranger.

Also called  ‘The jolly fat frog’, it can be found in Rimbault’s ‘A Collection of Old Nursery Rhymes’ published 1864. It was featured in BBC broadcasts to schools, Spring term 1961 without the last verse.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A jolly fat frog lived in the river swim-o!

A handsome black crow lived on the river brim-o!

"Come on shore! Come on shore!"

Said the crow to the frog, and then-o!

"No, you'll bite me! No, you'll bite me!"

Said the frog to the crow again-o!

 

"Oh, there is sweet music on yonder green hill-o!

And you shall be a dancer, a dancer all in yellow,

All in yellow! All in yellow!"

Said the crow to the frog, and then-o!

"All in yellow! All in yellow!"

Said the crow to the frog again-o!

 

"Farewell, ye little fishes, that in the river swim-o!

I'm going to be a dancer, a dancer all in yellow."

"Oh, beware! Oh, beware!"

Said the fish to the frog; and then-o!

"I'll take care! I'll take care!"

Said the frog to the fish again-o!

 

The frog began a-swimming, a-swimming to the land-o!

And the crow began a-jumping, to give him a-hand-o!

"Sir, you're welcome! Sir, you're welcome!"

Said the crow to the frog, and then-o!

"Sir, I thank you! Sir, I thank you!"

Said the frog to the crow again-o!

 

"But where is the sweet music on yonder green hill-o?

And where are all the dancers, the dancers in yellow?

"Sir, they're here! Sir, they're here!"

Said the crow to the frog —Swallows the frog GULP!

 


 

 

The frog and the mouse O

 

 


As a traditional English folk song such a pairing is not so unusual; some of these lines and themes can be found in other songs and tunes see:  http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2338

A ‘buckler’ is a small round shield.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a frog lived in a well,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

There was a mouse lived in a mill,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

This frog he would a-wooing ride,

With sword and pistol by his side.

With a harum scarum diddle dum darum,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

 

He rode till he came to Mouse's Hall,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

Where he most tenderly did call,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

"Oh! Mistress Mouse, are you at home?

And if you are, oh please come down."

With a harum scarum diddle dum darum,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

 

"My Uncle Rat is not at home;

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

I dare not for my life come down."

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

Then Uncle Rat he soon comes home,

"And who's been here since I've been gone?"

With a harum scarum diddle dum darum,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

 

"Here's been a fine young gentleman,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

Who says he'll have me if he can."

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

Then Uncle Rat gave his consent,

And made a handsome settlement.

With a harum scarum diddle dum darum,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

 

Four partridge pies with season made,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

Two potted larks and marmalade,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

Four woodcocks and a venison pie,

I would that at that feast were I!

With a harum scarum diddle dum darum,

Whipsee diddledee dandy oh!

 


 

 

The grey hawk O

 

 


A folk song, possibly from Dorset in England. It was published in BBC broadcasts to schools, Time and Tune, Spring term 1961. It was also published in OUP Ears and Eyes Bk2 1974 where it was ascribed to Mrs Vaughan Williams. In both the publications you can find the first two verses of a longer song about a cuckolded husband. Find out more at: https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/littlegreyhawk.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Once I had a grey hawk, and a pretty grey hawk,

A sweet pretty bird of my own.

But she took fright and she flew away quite,

And there’s nobody knows where she's gone, my brave boys,

And there's nobody knows where she's gone.

 

So it's over the forest I rambled away,

And through the green fields I did stray.

I hollered, I whooped, I played on my flute,

Not my sweet pretty bird could I find, my brave boys,

Not my sweet pretty bird could I find.


 

 

The Golden Vanity 🔊

 

 


Another school favourite. There are a huge number of versions of this song. Find out more at:  https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=11747

This one is more or less, the chorus in particular differs, from: ‘English Folk-Songs for Schools’ collected and arranged by S Baring Gould, M.A. and Cecil J. Sharp, B.A.. It was taken from ‘Songs of the West’ published in 1891 by S Baring Gould and H. Fleetwood Sheppard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, I have a ship in the North Country,

And she goes by the name of the Golden Vanity,

Oh, I fear she will be taken by a Spanish Galalie,

As she sails by the lowlands, low,

By the lowlands, lowlands,

As she sails by the lowlands low.

 

To the captain then up spake the little cabin boy,

He said "What is my fee if the galley I destroy?

The Spanish galleon, if no more it shall annoy,

As you sail by the lowlands low…

 

Of silver and of gold I will give to you a store,

And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,

Of treasure and of fee as well, I'll give to thee galore,

As we sail by the lowlands low…

 

Then the boy bared his chest and straightway leaped in,

And he held in his mouth, an auger sharp and thin,

And he swam until he came to the Spanish galleon

As she lay along the lowlands low...

 

Well he bored with the auger, he bored once and twice,

And some were playing cards, and some were playing dice;

When the water it flowed in, it dazzled in their eyes

And she sank by the lowland low…

 

So the cabin boy swam back all to the larboard side,

Saying: "Captain, take me up, for I'm drifting with the tide!”

“No I'll shoot you, and I'll drown you, if you claim my child as bride;

You must drown by the lowlands low…”

 

Then the cabin boy did swim all to the starboard side,

Saying: "Shipsmates, take me up, for I'm drifting with the tide,”

Then they pulled him on the deck, but he closed his eyes and died,

As they sailed by the lowland low…

 

They wrapped him in his hammock, it was so long and wide,

And they cast the gallant cabin boy, over the ship’s side,

And they left him without more ado, adrifting with the tide

And to sink by the lowland low...


 

 

 

The gypsy rover O

 

 


The sentiments of this song can be found in many folk songs especially the ‘The raggle taggle gypsies’ but this one was written more recently in the 1950s by the Dublin songwriter by Leo Maguire. Find out more at:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Whistling_Gypsy  and  http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10547 It also featured in BBC Schools ‘Singing together’ Spring 1973.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The gypsy rover came over the hill,

Down through the valley so shady,

He whistled and he sang ‘til the greenwoods rang,

And he won the heart of a lady.

Chorus

Ah dee doo, ah dee doo dah day

Ah dee doo, ah dee day dee,

He whistled and he sang 'til the greenwoods rang,

And he won the heart of a lady.

 

She left her father’s castle gate,

She left her own true lover,

She left her servants and her estate,

To follow the gypsy rover.

 

Her father saddled his fastest steed,

Roamed the valleys all over

Sought his daughter at great speed

And the whistling gypsy rover.

 

He came at last to a mansion fine,

Down by the river Claydee,

And there was music and there was wine,

For the gypsy and his lady.

 

“He is no gypsy, my father,” she cried,

“But lord of these lands all over,

And I shall stay ‘til my dying day,

With my whistling gypsy rover.”


 

 

The grey hawk O

 

 


A folk song, possibly from Dorset in England. It was published in BBC broadcasts to schools, Time and Tune, Spring term 1961. It was also published in OUP Ears and Eyes Bk2 1974 where it was ascribed to Mrs Vaughan Williams. In both the publications you can find the first two verses of a longer song about a cuckolded husband. Find out more at: https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/littlegreyhawk.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Once I had a grey hawk, and a pretty grey hawk,

A sweet pretty bird of my own.

But she took fright and she flew away quite,

And there’s nobody knows where she's gone, my brave boys,

And there's nobody knows where she's gone.

 

So it's over the forest I rambled away,

And through the green fields I did stray.

I hollered, I whooped, I played on my flute,

Not my sweet pretty bird could I find, my brave boys,

Not my sweet pretty bird could I find.


 

 

 

The jackfish O

 

 


A traditional song from Virginia. Find out more at: http://patmccaskey.com/jackfish-952

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


That old Jackfish swimming up the stream,

I asked that Jackfish what did he mean.

Just baited a hook to catch a shad,

The first thing he bit was my old Dad.

 

Chorus:

Oh, my lordy lor gal, Cindy, Cindy,

Lordy lor gal, Cindy Sue.

 

Fishpole broke and I got mad,

And down to the bottom went old Dad.

I grabbed that Jackfish by the snout,

And turned that Jackfish wrong side out.


 

 

The keeper 🔊

 

 


This song collected by Cecil Sharp and published in school songbooks is remembered with pleasure from primary school years and community gatherings in the 1950s. Find out about earlier more ‘less suitable’ versions at: http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/forum/484.html .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The keeper did a-hunting go,

And under his cloak he carried a bow,

All for to shoot a merry little doe,

Among the leaves so green, O.

 

Chorus:

Jackie boy! Master! Sing ye well! Very well!

Hey down! Ho down! Derry derry down,

Among the leaves so green, O.

To my hey down down! To my ho down down!

Hey down! Ho down! Derry derry down,

Among the leaves so green, O.

 

The first doe he shot at he missed;

The second doe he trimmed, he kissed;

The third doe went where nobody wist,

Among the leaves so green, O.

 

The fourth doe she did cross the plain,

The keeper fetched her back again.

Where she is now, she may remain,

Among the leaves so green, O.

 

The fifth doe she did cross the brook;

The keeper fetched her back with his crook;

Where she is now you may go and look,

Among the leaves so green, O.

 

The sixth doe she ran over the plain;

But he with his hounds did turn her again,

And it's there he did hunt in a merry, merry vein,

Among the leaves so green, 0.


 

 

 

The lambs in the green fields O

 

 


This lovely Irish air comes from Bill Meek’s ‘Moon penny’; I have added some chords.

It is also known as ‘The false bride’ and below is just the chorus as it is a mournful ballad that tells of a wedding with a tragic ending.

Find out the whole story at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=123300

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The lambs in the green fields they sport as they play,

And lots of strawberries grow around the salt sea,

And lots of strawberries grow round the salt sea,

And many’s the ship sails the ocean.


 

 

The lion is king of the jungle O

 

 


A song from the 1970s. Words and music by Christopher Rowe.

 

 

 

 

 


The lion is king of the jungle,

A terrible beast to behold;

All of the animals know who he is,

And everyone does as he’s told,

Yes, everyone does as he’s told.

 

There’s no-one as strong as the lion,

And this is why he’s so proud:

He leaps in the air and creeps through the grass,

And his voice is terribly loud,

His voice is terribly loud.

 

You know when the lion is angry,

He lets out a frightening roar;

The birds fly away and the animals hide,

They know he is coming for sure,

Yes, they know he is coming for sure.

 

The lion is frightened of no-one,

He walks with his head held high;

The animals know by the mane on his neck

That this is the king going by,

Yes, this is the king going by.

 

The lion is king of the jungle,

A terrible beast to behold;

All of the animals know who he is,

And everyone does as he’s told,

Yes, everyone does as he’s told.

 

 


 

 

The lost pony 🔊

 

 


A rather sad little song written by Mabel F. Wilson to a Slovakian tune. You can find it in ‘Music time’ published by OUP in 1961.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lonely I wander upon my way,

Searching for Dobbin the livelong day,

Far and near, far and near,

Searching for Dobbin the livelong day.

 

I left him grazing among the hay,

When I returned he had gone away,

Far away, far away,

When I returned he had gone away.


 

 

The merry green fields of the lowland 🔊

 

 


It is suggested that this song is an ancestor of ‘Old MacDonald’, see the Ozark Folksongs’ Volume 3. It was recorded by a Mr. Doney Hammontree in 1942 who learnt it circa 1900.

I first came across it on ‘The Song Bag’ LP sung by Tony Saletan.

Arranged here by Dany Rosevear.

Find out more  at: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63612n

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, once I had a very fine hog,

In the merry green fields of the lowland,

I turned him in to be seen,

In the merry green fields of the lowland.

And an oink here, and an oink there,

And naff-naff-naff and ev'rybody laugh as they go past,

The merry green fields of the lowland.

 

Oh, once I had a very fine dog,

In the merry green fields of the lowland,

I turned him in to be seen,

In the merry green fields of the lowland.

And a bow-wow here and a bow-wow there

And here a bow, there a bow, here a bow-wow

And an oink here and an oink there,

And naff-naff-naff and everybody laugh as they go past,

The merry green fields of the lowland.

 

Oh, once I had a very fine turkey,

In the merry green fields of the lowland,

I turned him in to be seen,

In the merry green fields of the lowland.

And a gibble-gobble here and a gibble-gobble there,

And here a gobble, there a gobble, here a gibble-gobble,

And a bow-wow here and a bow-wow there,

Here a bow, there a bow, here a bow-wow,

And an oink here and an oink there,

And naff-naff-naff and everybody laugh as they go past,

The merry green fields of the lowland.

 

Oh, once I had a very fine sheep,

In the merry green fields of the lowland,

I turned him in to be seen,

In the merry green fields of the lowland.

And a blib-blab here and a blib-blab there,

Here a blab, there a blab, here a blib-blab,

And a gibble-gobble here and a gibble-gobble there,

Here a gobble, there a gobble, here a gibble-gobble

And a bow-wow here and a bow-wow there,

And here a bow, there a bow, here a bow-wow,

And an oink here and an oink there,

And naff-naff-naff and everybody laugh as they go past,

The merry green fields of the lowland.


 

 

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