Song cupboard T1 g-n

The Golden Vanity

The grey hawk

The gypsy rover

The jackfish

The keeper

The lambs in the green fields

The lion is king of the jungle

The lost pony

The man in the moon as he sails the sky

The merry green fields of the lowland

Last updated: 1/9/2019 4:16 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we go

compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

Return to the ‘Singing games for children’ home page

To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

The Golden Vanity 🔊

 

 


Another school favourite. There are a huge number of versions of this song. Find out more at:  https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=11747

This one is more or less, the chorus in particular differs, from: ‘English Folk-Songs for Schools’ collected and arranged by S Baring Gould, M.A. and Cecil J. Sharp, B.A.. It was taken from ‘Songs of the West’ published in 1891 by S Baring Gould and H. Fleetwood Sheppard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, I have a ship in the North Country,

And she goes by the name of the Golden Vanity,

Oh, I fear she will be taken by a Spanish Galalie,

As she sails by the lowlands, low,

By the lowlands, lowlands,

As she sails by the lowlands low.

 

To the captain then up spake the little cabin boy,

He said "What is my fee if the galley I destroy?

The Spanish galleon, if no more it shall annoy,

As you sail by the lowlands low…

 

Of silver and of gold I will give to you a store,

And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore,

Of treasure and of fee as well, I'll give to thee galore,

As we sail by the lowlands low…

 

Then the boy bared his chest and straightway leaped in,

And he held in his mouth, an auger sharp and thin,

And he swam until he came to the Spanish galleon

As she lay along the lowlands low...

 

Well he bored with the auger, he bored once and twice,

And some were playing cards, and some were playing dice;

When the water it flowed in, it dazzled in their eyes

And she sank by the lowland low…

 

So the cabin boy swam back all to the larboard side,

Saying: "Captain, take me up, for I'm drifting with the tide!”

“No I'll shoot you, and I'll drown you, if you claim my child as bride;

You must drown by the lowlands low…”

 

Then the cabin boy did swim all to the starboard side,

Saying: "Shipsmates, take me up, for I'm drifting with the tide,”

Then they pulled him on the deck, but he closed his eyes and died,

As they sailed by the lowland low…

 

They wrapped him in his hammock, it was so long and wide,

And they cast the gallant cabin boy, over the ship’s side,

And they left him without more ado, adrifting with the tide

And to sink by the lowland low...


 

 

The grey hawk O

 

 


A folk song, possibly from Dorset in England. It was published in BBC broadcasts to schools, Time and Tune, Spring term 1961. It was also published in OUP Ears and Eyes Bk2 1974 where it was ascribed to Mrs Vaughan Williams. In both the publications you can find the first two verses of a longer song about a cuckolded husband. Find out more at: https://mainlynorfolk.info/watersons/songs/littlegreyhawk.html 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Once I had a grey hawk, and a pretty grey hawk,

A sweet pretty bird of my own.

But she took fright and she flew away quite,

And there’s nobody knows where she's gone, my brave boys,

And there's nobody knows where she's gone.

 

So it's over the forest I rambled away,

And through the green fields I did stray.

I hollered, I whooped, I played on my flute,

Not my sweet pretty bird could I find, my brave boys,

Not my sweet pretty bird could I find.


 

 

The gypsy rover O

 

 


The sentiments of this song can be found in many folk songs especially the ‘The raggle taggle gypsies’ but this one was written more recently in the 1950s by the Dublin songwriter by Leo Maguire. Find out more at:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Whistling_Gypsy  and  http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10547 It also featured in BBC Schools ‘Singing together’ Spring 1973.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The gypsy rover came over the hill,

Down through the valley so shady,

He whistled and he sang ‘til the greenwoods rang,

And he won the heart of a lady.

Chorus

Ah dee doo, ah dee doo dah day

Ah dee doo, ah dee day dee,

He whistled and he sang 'til the greenwoods rang,

And he won the heart of a lady.

 

She left her father’s castle gate,

She left her own true lover,

She left her servants and her estate,

To follow the gypsy rover.

 

Her father saddled his fastest steed,

Roamed the valleys all over

Sought his daughter at great speed

And the whistling gypsy rover.

 

He came at last to a mansion fine,

Down by the river Claydee,

And there was music and there was wine,

For the gypsy and his lady.

 

“He is no gypsy, my father,” she cried,

“But lord of these lands all over,

And I shall stay ‘til my dying day,

With my whistling gypsy rover.”


 

 

The jackfish O

 

 


A traditional song from Virginia. Find out more at: http://patmccaskey.com/jackfish-952

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


That old Jackfish swimming up the stream,

I asked that Jackfish what did he mean.

Just baited a hook to catch a shad,

The first thing he bit was my old Dad.

 

Chorus:

Oh, my lordy lor gal, Cindy, Cindy,

Lordy lor gal, Cindy Sue.

 

Fishpole broke and I got mad,

And down to the bottom went old Dad.

I grabbed that Jackfish by the snout,

And turned that Jackfish wrong side out.


 

 

The keeper 🔊

 

 


This song collected by Cecil Sharp and published in school songbooks is remembered with pleasure from primary school years and community gatherings in the 1950s. Find out about earlier more ‘less suitable’ versions at: http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/forum/484.html .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The keeper did a-hunting go,

And under his cloak he carried a bow,

All for to shoot a merry little doe,

Among the leaves so green, O.

 

Chorus:

Jackie boy! Master! Sing ye well! Very well!

Hey down! Ho down! Derry derry down,

Among the leaves so green, O.

To my hey down down! To my ho down down!

Hey down! Ho down! Derry derry down,

Among the leaves so green, O.

 

The first doe he shot at he missed;

The second doe he trimmed, he kissed;

The third doe went where nobody wist,

Among the leaves so green, O.

 

The fourth doe she did cross the plain,

The keeper fetched her back again.

Where she is now, she may remain,

Among the leaves so green, O.

 

The fifth doe she did cross the brook;

The keeper fetched her back with his crook;

Where she is now you may go and look,

Among the leaves so green, O.

 

The sixth doe she ran over the plain;

But he with his hounds did turn her again,

And it's there he did hunt in a merry, merry vein,

Among the leaves so green, 0.


 

 

 

The lambs in the green fields O

 

 


This lovely Irish air comes from Bill Meek’s ‘Moon penny’; I have added some chords.

It is also known as ‘The false bride’ and below is just the chorus as it is a mournful ballad that tells of a wedding with a tragic ending.

Find out the whole story at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=123300

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The lambs in the green fields they sport as they play,

And lots of strawberries grow around the salt sea,

And lots of strawberries grow round the salt sea,

And many’s the ship sails the ocean.


 

 

The lion is king of the jungle O

 

 


A song from the 1970s. Words and music by Christopher Rowe.

 

 

 

 

 


The lion is king of the jungle,

A terrible beast to behold;

All of the animals know who he is,

And everyone does as he’s told,

Yes, everyone does as he’s told.

 

There’s no-one as strong as the lion,

And this is why he’s so proud:

He leaps in the air and creeps through the grass,

And his voice is terribly loud,

His voice is terribly loud.

 

You know when the lion is angry,

He lets out a frightening roar;

The birds fly away and the animals hide,

They know he is coming for sure,

Yes, they know he is coming for sure.

 

The lion is frightened of no-one,

He walks with his head held high;

The animals know by the mane on his neck

That this is the king going by,

Yes, this is the king going by.

 

The lion is king of the jungle,

A terrible beast to behold;

All of the animals know who he is,

And everyone does as he’s told,

Yes, everyone does as he’s told.

 

 


 

 

The lost pony 🔊

 

 


A rather sad little song written by Mabel F. Wilson to a Slovakian tune. You can find it in ‘Music time’ published by OUP in 1961.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lonely I wander upon my way,

Searching for Dobbin the livelong day,

Far and near, far and near,

Searching for Dobbin the livelong day.

 

I left him grazing among the hay,

When I returned he had gone away,

Far away, far away,

When I returned he had gone away.


 

 

The man in the moon as he sails the sky  🔊

 

 


An old nursery rhyme. Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Man in the Moon as he sails the sky,

Is a very remarkable skipper;

But he made a mistake when he tried to take

A drink of milk from the Dipper.

He dipped right out of the Milky Way,

And slowly and carefully filled it;

The Big Bear growled, and the Little Bear howled

And frightened him so that he spilled it!

 

The Man in the Moon wore a sad little face,

For he wanted that milk for his dinner;

And he melted away, like a snowdrift in May,

Each night just a little bit thinner.

The Big Bear called to the Little Bear

"His tummy is grumbling and griping.

Now tell me please, if we fed him some cheese,

Would that keep the poor man from pining?"


 

 

The merry green fields of the lowland 🔊

 

 


It is suggested that this song is an ancestor of ‘Old MacDonald’, see the Ozark Folksongs’ Volume 3. It was recorded by a Mr. Doney Hammontree in 1942 who learnt it circa 1900.

I first came across it on ‘The Song Bag’ LP sung by Tony Saletan.

Arranged here by Dany Rosevear.

Find out more  at: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63612n

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, once I had a very fine hog,

In the merry green fields of the lowland,

I turned him in to be seen,

In the merry green fields of the lowland.

And an oink here, and an oink there,

And naff-naff-naff and ev'rybody laugh as they go past,

The merry green fields of the lowland.

 

Oh, once I had a very fine dog,

In the merry green fields of the lowland,

I turned him in to be seen,

In the merry green fields of the lowland.

And a bow-wow here and a bow-wow there

And here a bow, there a bow, here a bow-wow

And an oink here and an oink there,

And naff-naff-naff and everybody laugh as they go past,

The merry green fields of the lowland.

 

Oh, once I had a very fine turkey,

In the merry green fields of the lowland,

I turned him in to be seen,

In the merry green fields of the lowland.

And a gibble-gobble here and a gibble-gobble there,

And here a gobble, there a gobble, here a gibble-gobble,

And a bow-wow here and a bow-wow there,

Here a bow, there a bow, here a bow-wow,

And an oink here and an oink there,

And naff-naff-naff and everybody laugh as they go past,

The merry green fields of the lowland.

 

Oh, once I had a very fine sheep,

In the merry green fields of the lowland,

I turned him in to be seen,

In the merry green fields of the lowland.

And a blib-blab here and a blib-blab there,

Here a blab, there a blab, here a blib-blab,

And a gibble-gobble here and a gibble-gobble there,

Here a gobble, there a gobble, here a gibble-gobble

And a bow-wow here and a bow-wow there,

And here a bow, there a bow, here a bow-wow,

And an oink here and an oink there,

And naff-naff-naff and everybody laugh as they go past,

The merry green fields of the lowland.


 

 

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