Song cupboard R-S

Rabbit run on the frozen ground

Raccoon has a bushy tail

Ring ding dong Johnny

Risha, rasha, rusha

Robin-a-Thrush

Sandy River bells

Say, bonnie lassie

Scarborough Fair

Shady Grove

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o

Shortnin' bread

Simple gifts

Sing a song of spaceships

Sing ivy

Shanghai chicken

Someone’s in the kitchen with Dinah

Somewhere there’s a forest

Song of the Delhi Tongawallah

Song of the bugs

Song of the fishes

Sourwood Mountain

Star of the evening

Sun and stars

Susie, little Susie

Sweet potatoes

Last updated: 8/13/2018 4:14 PM

The songs below are compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

Return to the ‘Singing games for children’ home

To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

Rabbit run on the frozen ground 🔊

 

 


A Kentucky call and response folk song collected by Jean Thomas.

Add other woodland creatures such as squirrel and deer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rabbit run on the frozen ground! Who told you so?

Rabbit run on the frozen ground! How do you know?

I caught a rabbit, uh-huh!

I caught a rabbit, uh-huh!

I caught a rabbit, uh-huh!

Then I let it go!

 

Foxy run on the frozen ground! Who told you so?

Foxy run on the frozen ground! How do you know?

I caught a fox, uh-huh!

I caught a fox, uh-huh!

I caught a fox, uh-huh!

Then I let it go!

 

Bear run on the frozen ground! Who told you so?

Bear run on the frozen ground! How do you know?

I caught a bear, uh-huh!

I caught a bear, uh-huh!

I caught a bear, uh-huh!

Then I let it go!


 

 

Raccoon’s got a bushy tail 🔊

 

 


A folk song from Virginia and Mississippi.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Racoon’s got a bushy tail,

Possum’s tail goes bare,

Rabbit’s got no tail at all

Just a little old bunch of hair.

 

Raccoon is a mighty man,

He rambles through the dark,

You ought to see him hunt his den

When he hears old Rover bark.

 

Possum up the persimmon tree,

Raccoon on the ground,

Raccoon says to possum,

"Won't you shake them simmons down?”

 

Rabbit’s on the pine tree stump,

Raccoon in the hollow,

Possum in the potato patch,

As plump as he can wallow.

 

Racoon’s got a bushy tail,

Possum’s tail goes bare,

Rabbit’s got no tail at all

Just a little old bunch of hair.


 

 

 

Ring ding dong Johnny O

 

Another song that tells the story of Noah and the flood.

This one is from the BBC television’s Music Time Spring 1983.

 

Move around the room at different speeds – quickly each time the chorus is sung, more slowly for each verse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a house of wood

A-floating on the sea.

Ring ding dong Johnny,

Dance along with me.

 

The rain had caused a flood,

There was no land to see.

Ring ding dong...

 

And every kind of beast

Had joined the company.

Ring ding dong...

 

And Noah steered the ark,

A brave old man was he.

Ring ding dong...

 

And when the floods had gone

They landed cheerfully.

Ring ding dong...

.


 

 

Risha, rasha, rusha O

 

This was translated by Mabel F. Wilson from words by G. Götze and the music is by G. Falke 1853-1916,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Risha, rasha, rusha,

The hare is in the bush!

Risha, rasha, rusha,

The hare is in the bush!

With his beady eye he’s watching,

He’s afraid you’ll try to catch him,

Risha, rasha, rusha,

The hare is in the bush!

 

Risha, rasha, rusha,

The hare is in the house! ...

Quickly run and catch his tail

Before he’s off o’er hill and dale,

Risha, rasha, rusha,

The hare is in the house!

 

Risha, rasha, rusha,

Oh have you caught him yet? ...

What, he’s run into the meadow?

Oh, you are a silly fellow!

Risha, rasha, rusha,

Oh have you caught him yet?

.


 

 

Robin-a-Thrush O

 

 


A tale of a decidedly undomesticated wife. There is a longer version of this song (http://www.joe-offer.com/folkinfo/songs/795.html ); the shorter version and tune below comes from ‘140 Folk Tunes’ by Dr. Archibald T. Davidson and Thomas Whitney Surette published in Massachusetts in 1915 for teachers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, Robin-a-Thrush, he married a wife,

With a hoppety, moppety, mow, now;

She proved to be the plague of his life,

With a hig jig jiggety, ruffety petticoat,

Robin-a-Thrush cries mow, now!

 

Her cheese when made was put on the shelf,

With a hoppety, moppety, mow, now;

And it never was turned till it turned of itself;

With a hig jig jiggety, ruffety petticoat.

Robin-a-Thrush cries mow, now!

 

It turned and turned 'til it walked on the floor,

With a hoppety, moppety, mow, now;

It stood upon legs and walked out the door;

With a hig jig jiggety, ruffety petticoat.

Robin-a-Thrush cries mow, now!

 

It walked 'til it came to Banbury Fair,

With a hoppety, moppety, mow, now;

The dame followed after upon a grey mare;

With a hig jig jiggety, ruffety petticoat.

Robin-a-Thrush cries mow, now!

 

This song, it was made for gentlemen,

With a hoppety, moppety, mow, now;

If you want any more, you must sing it again;

With a hig jig jiggety, ruffety petticoat.

Robin-a-Thrush cries mow, now!


 

 

Sandy River bells 🔊

 

 


Sandy River bells is a popular fiddle tune but the music for the sung version here is a little different. The words below are from the Cecil Sharp's Appalachian collection as sung by Lucy Cannady, Endicott, VA, 22/8/1918:

I came across it in Shan Graebe’s book of traditional children’s songs ‘Rosy Apple’ 2014. The suggestion of singing it in different keys is hers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sandy River bells keep jingling, jingling,

Sandy River bells keep jingling, jingling,

Sandy River bells keep jingling, jingling,

I've got no use for Sandy River bells.


 

 

Say, bonnie lassie 🔊

 

 


This is an alternative to ‘Old MacDonald’s Farm’ and is another song from the wonderful ‘Music Box Songbook’ published in 1987.

It is classed as traditional Scottish though there is very little that can be found when researching on the internet, the closest is an American song from Winston-Salem in 1926 ‘Come, says Harry, will you gang with me to the merry, merry woods I own’, see https://archive.org/details/frankcbrowncolle03fran p.176. There is another on p.176 with a similar structure from Nebraska called ‘The banks of Holland’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Say, bonnie lassie, will you gang with me

To the bonnie, bonnie house of Aaron?

Say, bonnie lassie, will you gang with me

To feed my father's ducks?

With a quack, quack here and a quack, quack there,

Here a quack, there a quack, everywhere a quack, quack,

Say, bonnie lassie, will you gang with me

To the bonnie, bonnie house of Aaron?

 

…To feed my father's geese?

A queen-quawn here and a queen-quawn there,

Here a queen, there a quawn, everywhere a queen-quawn…

A quack-quack here and a quack-quack there…

 

(Continue with turkeys: gibble-gobble; chickens: cluck-cluck; sheep: baa-baa; etc.)


 

 

Scarborough Fair 🔊

 

 


A Child ballad #2; an American variant in the dorian mode. This one from ‘Sail Away -155 American folk songs to sing, read and play’, published in1981.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Are you going to Scarborough Fair?

Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme,

Remember me to one who lives there,

For once she was a true love of mine.

 

Tell her to make me a cambric shirt,

Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme,

Without any seams or fine needlework,

Then she shall be a true love of mine.

 

Tell her to wash it in yonder well,

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;

Where never sprung water nor a drop of rain fell,

And she shall be a true love of mine.

 

Tell her to dry it on yonder thorn,

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;

Which never bore blossom since Adam was born,

Then she shall be a true love of mine.

 

Now he has asked me questions three,

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;

I hope he'll answer as many for me,

Before he shall be a true love of mine.

 

Tell him to find me an acre of land,

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;

Between the salt water and the sea sand,

Then he shall be a true love of mine.

 

Tell him to plough it with a ram's horn,

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;

And sow it all over with one peppercorn,

And he shall be a true love of mine.

 

Tell him to reap it with a sickle of leather,

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme;

And bind it up with a peacock's feather,

And he shall be a true lover of mine.

 

When he has done and finished his work,

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme:

Oh, tell him to come and he'll have his shirt,

And he shall be a true love of mine.


 

 

 

Shady Grove O

 

A traditional North American song that I enjoyed singing in the 1960s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Shady Grove my little love

Shady Grove I know;

Shady Grove my little love,

Bound for the Shady Grove.

 

Cheeks as red as a blooming rose,

Eyes are the deepest brown;

You are the darling of my heart,

Stay till the sun goes down.

 

Went to see my Shady Grove,

She was standing in the door,

Shoes and stockings in her hand,

Little bare feet on the floor.

 

Wish I had a big fine horse,

And corn to feed him on,

Pretty little girl stay at home,

Feed him when I'm gone.


 

 

Shake that little foot, Dinah-0 🔊

 

 


A song from Texas. This version comes from ‘Animal folk songs for children’ selected and arranged by Ruth Crawford Seeger, published in1950.

For more versions visit: http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/05/information-about-several-early-lyric.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Old Aunt Dinah went to town

Riding a billy goat, leading a hound,

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o,

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o.

 

Hound dog barked, billy goat jumped,

Set Aunt Dinah straddle of a stump,

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o,

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o.

 

Sift the meal and save the bran;

Give it to the old cow to make her stand,

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o,

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o.

 

Old Aunt Dinah, sick in bed,

Sent for the doctor, doctor said,

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o,

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o.

 

Get up Dinah, you ain’t sick,

All you need is a hickory stick,

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o,

Shake that little foot, Dinah-o.


 

 

 

Shanghai chicken 🔊

 

 


A play party song of African-American origin. I have as yet to find the play party game but there is a Kodaly egg passing game which looks complicated but fun at Music a la Abbott.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Shanghai chicken grows so tall, few days, few days;

Almost reach the top of the wall and I’m goin’ home.

 

I have a home over yonder, few days, few days.

I have a home over yonder and I’m goin’ home.

 

Shanghai chicken grows so tall, few days, few days.

Take that egg a month to fall, and I’m goin’ home.

 

Great big fish they call a whale, few days, few days.

Swallowed Jonah head and tail, and I’m goin’ home.

 


 

 

 Shortnin' bread O

 

This children’s folk song with its great rhythm was regularly sung in UK classrooms in the 1960s and 70s.

I taught in Handsworth, Birmingham around this time and with its wonderful swing was very popular with the second generation children of West Indian immigrants in my classes.

 

It also featured in BBC radio’s Autumn term 1965 Time and Tune, albeit with one verse and chorus.

Find more about the origins of this lively song at: http://pancocojams.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/versions-of-shortnin-bread-1900-1950.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Two little children lying in bed,

One jumped up and bumped his head.

Mama called the doctor and the doctor said,

Mama's little baby loves shortnin' bread.

 

Mama's little baby loves shortnin', shortnin',

Mama's little baby loves shortnin' bread,

Mama's little baby loves shortnin', shortnin',

Mama's little baby loves shortnin' bread.

 

Put on the skillet, put on the lead,

Mama's gonna make a little shortnin' bread.

That ain't all she's gonna do,

Mama's gonna make a little coffee too.


 

 

Simple gifts O

 

 

 


Composed by Joseph Brockett in 1848 it was written as a dance song: http://www.americanmusicpreservation.com/JosephBrackettSimpleGifts.htm

I first came across this song in the 1960s; the delightful tune became a very familiar one in school assemblies as ‘Lord of the dance’ by Sidney Carter. I added it to my class music collection from a BBC Publication ‘Singing Together’ Spring 1974 to where it was described as an American ‘Shaker’ song; I have omitted the second verse as it was not in the original version.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


'Tis the gift to be simple, 'tis the gift to be free,

'Tis the gift to come down where you ought to be;

And when we find ourselves in the place just right,

'Twill be in the valley of love and delight.

When true simplicity is gained,

To bow and to bend we shan't be ashamed.

To turn, turn, will be our delight,

'Till by turning, turning we come round right.


 

 

Sing a song of spaceships O

 

 

 


Children are fascinated by the solar system and the concept of space travel.

The words of the first verse are by June Tillman and the second by Dany Rosevear to celebrate the most recent episode of astronauts braving a space rocket to do research at the space station as it circles the Earth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sing a song of spaceships,

Rockets zoom off high,

Sing a song of spaceships,

Sparkling in the sky.

Sing a song of spaceships,

Going to the moon,

I hope the spaceships will be safe

And come back very soon.

 

Sing a song of spaceships,

Wave as they pass by,

Astronauts are floating,

Busy way up high.

To keep the old space station

Circling round and round.

I wonder if they can see me

Down here on the ground.


 

 

 

Sing ivy O

 

 

There are many versions of this song; The words of this one with slight changes come from ‘What the children sing’ harmonised by Alfred Moffat and was published around 1915.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My father he left me an acre of land,

Sing ovey, sing ivy.

My father he left me an acre of land,

Sing holly, go whistle and ivy.

 

I ploughed it one morning with a ram's horn,

Sing ovey, sing ivy.

I sowed it all over with two pepper corns,

Sing holly, go whistle and ivy.

 

I harrowed it next with a bramble bush...

And reaped it all with my little penknife...

 

The little mice carried it into the barn...

I threshed it there with a fine goose quill...

 

The cat she carried it into the mill...

The miller he said that he’d work with a will...

.


 

 

Someone’s in the kitchen with DinahO

 

A popular summer camp song in the English speaking world.

Children love songs with nonsense words and phrases and even the youngest will pick up the words of the chorus quickly.

If you’re feeling very brave add an extra verse: Fee, plonk ting, fie, plonk ting, fiddle-ee-i-o, plonk ting,

 

 

 

Directions:

Mime the playing of instruments for each of the following sounds: fee/flute, fie/clarinet, fiddle-i-o/violin, plonk/drum, ting/ triangle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Somewhere there's a forest 🔊

 

 


We all need our moments of peace and fresh air.

This song was written by Susan Stevens and appears in the ‘Our chalet songbook’ published in 1974 and then ABC schools ‘Sing!’ 1995.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Somewhere there's a forest,

Where you can stand and dream,

And walk alone beside the waters

Of a forest stream.

Chorus

Where quietness and peace of mind,

Are waiting there for you to find,

So leave the noisy world behind,

For just a little while.

 

Somewhere there's a seashore,

Where the wind is blowing free,

And wheeling seagulls call above,

The music of the sea.

Chorus

 

Somewhere there's a hillside,

Where you can climb at dawn,

And wonder at the sunrise,

As another day is born.

Chorus.

 


 

 

 

Song of the Delhi Tongawallah O

 

A Hindustani folk song. A Delhi tongawallah drives a horse and cart.

This translation can be found in ‘The Ditty Bag’ compiled by Jane E. Tobbit and written for the Girl Guides in 1946.

 

Move around the room at different speeds – quickly each time the chorus is sung and more slowly for each verse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Gallop quickly, gallop quickly,


Gallop quickly brother horse.

Gallop quickly, gallop quickly,


Gallop quickly brother horse

 

We have still five miles of travelling

And the shades of night are falling.

 

If cruel robber do waylay us,

What to do then? What to do then?

 

Grain and grass be yours in plenty

If we get home quickly, horse.

 

 


 

 

Song of the bugs O

 

 


This song has been adapted from Margaret Wise Brown’s poem. Find out more about her at: http://www.poemhunter.com/margaret-wise-brown/biography/ .

The adaptation and melody is by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Some bugs pinch and some bugs creep,

Some bugs buzz themselves to sleep.

Buzz, buzz, buzz,

Buzz, buzz, buzz,

Singing, flickering, buzzing bugs. X2

 

Some bugs fly when the moon is high.

Some bugs make a light in the sky.

Flicker, flicker firefly,

Flicker, flicker firefly,

This is the song of the bugs.

Flicker, flicker, flicker, Buzz, buzz! X2


 

 

Song of the fishes O

 

 


A sea song from New England; there are many more verses which cover most of the tasks needed aboard a sailing ship.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Come all you bold fishermen, listen to me,

While I sing you a song of the fish in the sea.

 

Chorus So blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow,

We're bound to the southward, so steady we go.

 

First comes the blue-fish a-wagging his tail,

He come up on the deck and yells: "All hands make sail!"

 

Next come the eels, with their nimble tails,

They jumped up aloft and loose all the sails.

 

Then comes the swordfish, the scourge of the sea,

The order he gives is "Helm's a-lee!"

 

Next comes the whale, the largest of all,

Singing out from the bridge: "Haul taut, mainsail, haul!"

 

Then comes the mackerel, with his striped back,

He flops on the bridge and yells: "Board the main tack!"

 

Along came a dolphin, a-flapping his tail,

He yells to the boatswain to reef the foresail.

 

Along came the shark, with his three rows of teeth,

He flops on the foreyard and takes a snug reef.

 

Up jumps the fisherman, stalwart and grim,

And with his big net he scoops them all in.

I'll go back to bed and I'll lie there all day,

If there's nothing for to eat then there’s nothing to pay.


 

 

Sourwood Mountain 🔊

 

 

 


This traditional American flirting folk song has been sung throughout the southern Appalachian mountains for more than 150 years. It is heard more often as a lively fiddle or banjo instrumental.

Sourwood is another name for the chestnut tree and its bark used for tanning leather.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chickens a-crowin' on Sourwood Mountain,

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

So many pretty girls I can't count 'em,

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

My true love's a blue-eyed daisy,

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

She won't come and I'm too lazy.

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

 

Big dog bark, little one bite you,

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

Big girl court, little one like you.

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

My true love lives over the river,

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

A few more jumps and I'll be with her.

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

 

Ducks in the pond, geese in the ocean,

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

I’ll go dancing when I take a notion.

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

You swing me and I’ll swing you,

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

We’ll go to heaven in the same old shoe.

Hey-de-ing-dang, diddle-umma-day.

 


 

 

Star of the evening 🔊

 

 

 


A camp fire song that allows older children to revisit and enjoy the nursery rhymes of their youth in a way that doesn’t feel too infantile. Many nursery rhyme will fit into this format.

I found this version in ‘World around songs’ published in 1986 ‘Very favorites of the very young’ where it is credited as traditional and from Northern Ireland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chorus

Star of the evening, pretty little evening star,

Star of the evening, shining on the harbour bar.

 

Little Miss Muffet, Muffet,

Sat on her tuffet, tuffet,

Eating her curds and whey;

Down came a spider, spider,

Sat down beside her, ‘side her,

And frightened Miss Muffet away.

 

Little Jack Horner, Horner,

Sat in a corner, corner,

Eating his Christmas pie;

He put in his thumb, his thumb,

And pulled out a plum, a plum,

And said what a good boy am I.

 

Old Mother Hubbard, Hubbard,

Went to her cupboard, cupboard,

To fetch her poor doggy a bone;

But when she got there, got there,

The cupboard was bare, was bare,

And so the poor little doggy had none.

 


 

 

 

Sun and stars 🔊

 

 

 


From ‘New elementary music’ by Charles A. Fullerton, published 1925.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sun wakes up at morning,

And goes to bed at evening.

Sun wakes up at morning,

And brings us light.

 

Stars wake up at evening,

And go to bed at morning.

Stars wake up at evening,

And play all night.

 


 

 

Susie, little Susie O

 

This German folk song is a cradle song from the 17th century from Lower Saxony ‘Suse, liebe Suse’ and is about desperation and poverty of the times. It later became familiar as a children’s song in the USA. Probably bought over by German settlers. This version is taken from this source.

Humperdink used it in 1893 at the beginning of his opera Hansel and Gretel.

I also came across a version ‘Susy little Susy’ in BBC radio’s Time and Tune; Spring 1966.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Susie, little Susie, now what is the news?

The geese are going barefoot because they've no shoes.

The gander can’t pay, so the cobblers refuse,

Pity little goslings that can’t afford shoes.

 

Susie, little Susie, some pennies I pray,

To buy a little supper of sugar and whey,

I'll sell my nice bed and go sleep on the straw,

Where feathers do not tickle and mice do not gnaw.

 

Eia-popeia, what is to be done?

Who'll give me milk and eggs, for bread I have none?

I'll go back to bed and I'll lie there all day,

If there's nothing for to eat then there’s nothing to pay.


 

 

Sweet potatoes 🔊

 

 

 


A Creole Folk tune with a counter melody by Hector Spalding; it was first published in 1919 in ‘Twice 55 The New Brown Book’, Sunny-Birchard Company, Illinois.

The version below was broadcast on BBC’s School’s Music Time in 1970. You can see a video of The Spinners singing it brilliantly along with a group of young eight year olds who sing the counter melody at an end of term concert: http://www.broadcastforschools.co.uk/site/Music_Time/Peter_and_the_Wolf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Soon as we all bake sweet potatoes,

Sweet potatoes, sweet potatoes,

Soon as we all bake sweet potatoes,

Eat them up right quick!

 

Counter melody or chorus:

Roo, roo, roo, roo, hoo roo,

Sing hode dinkum!

Roo, roo, roo, roo, hoo roo, hoo roo.

 

Soon as supper's done, mammy hollers,

Mammy hollers, mammy hollers,

Soon as supper's done, mammy hollers,

Time to go to bed.

 

Soon as all our heads touch the pillow,

Touch the pillow, touch the pillow,

Soon as all our heads touch the pillow,

Time go to sleep.

 

When the rooster crows in the morning,

In the morning, in the morning,

When the rooster crows in the morning,

Time we all got up.

Return to the ‘Singing games for children’ home