Song cupboard N

Nellie the Elephant

Nellie Bly

Never smile at a crocodile

Noah’s ark shanty

Nora Lee

Norwegian milking song

Last updated: 11/2/2020 2:41 PM

 

The songs below are part ofAway we go

compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

 

Nelly Bly 🔊

 

 


Stephen Foster wrote the original version of this song in 1850.

Nelly Bly also became the adopted name of the famous globetrotter, journalist and feminist Elizabeth Cochran. It became popular and adapted easily as a playground ditty; it is possible that the second two nursery rhyme verses below known as ‘Nellie Bligh’ were already familiar to Foster: http://www.rhymes.org.uk/a124-nelly-bligh.htm , http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=99147

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Nellie Bly, shuts her eye,

When she goes to sleep;

And in the morning, when she wakes,

The frog begins to peep,

 

Chorus:

“Hi Nellie! Ho Nellie! Come along with me,

I’ll sing for you, I’ll play for you,

The sweetest melody.”

 

Nelly Bly caught a fly,

Tied it to a string.

Let it go, to and fro,

Poor little thing.

 

Buzz wuzz was that little fly

And how he loved to roam,

Up and down the mantelpiece

And that he called his home.


 

 

Nellie the Elephant O

 

 


Written in 1956 by Ralph Butler and Peter Hart and made popular by Mandy Miller on Children’s Favourites where it was played many, many times in that and the following decade.

 

Sing it in a steady unhurried manner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


To Bombay a travelling circus came,

They brought an intelligent elephant and Nellie was her name.

One dark night she slipped her iron chain;

And off she ran to Hindustan and was never seen again.

 

Nellie the elephant packed her trunk and said goodbye to the circus.

Off she went with a trumpety-trump. Trump! Trump! Trump!

Nellie the Elephant packed her trunk and trundled back to the jungle.

Off she went with a trumpety-trump. Trump! Trump! Trump!

 

Night by night, she danced to the circus band.

When Nellie was leading the big parade, she looked so proud and grand.

No more tricks for Nellie to perform.

They taught her how to take a bow and she took the crowd by storm.

 

Nellie the elephant packed her trunk…

 

The head of the herd was calling far, far away.

They met one night in the silver light on the road to Mandalay.

 

So Nellie the elephant packed her trunk…

 


 

 

Never smile at a crocodile  🔊

 

 


A Disney tune by Frank Churchill from ‘Peter Pan’ released in 1953; the wonderful lyrics by Jack Lawrence were never used in the film. Find out more at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Never_Smile_at_a_Crocodile .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Never smile at a crocodile,

No, you can't get friendly with a crocodile;

Don't be taken in by his welcome grin,

He's imagining how well you'd fit within his skin.

Never smile at a crocodile,

Never tip your hat and stop to talk awhile

Never run, walk away, say “Good-night”, not “Good-day”

Clear the aisle and never smile at Mister Crocodile.

 

You may very well be well bred,

Lots of etiquette in your head,

But there's always some special case, time or place to forget etiquette.

F’r instance -

 

Never smile at a crocodile,

No, you can't get friendly with a crocodile;

Don't be taken in by his welcome grin,

He's imagining how well you'd fit within his skin.

Never smile at a crocodile,

Never tip your hat and stop to talk awhile

Don't be rude, never mock, throw a kiss, not a rock,

Clear the aisle but never smile at Mister Crocodile.


 

 

Noah’s ark shanty 🔊

 

 


A halyard shanty.

How did the dog get a cold nose? This is the song that will answer your question.

Animal parts could be acted out by children – though it could easily get out of hand! I originally found this in The Revels book of ‘Chanteys and sea songs’ compiled by John Langstaff. There are so many variants as in all good folk songs; verse two and three here are from different sources but both took my fancy! You can easily find the classic Cecil Sharp one on any decent search engine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


In ‘Frisco Bay there were three ships,

To me way-ay-ay-yuh!

In ‘Frisco Bay there were three ships,

A long time ago-wuh!

 

And one of them ships was Noah's old ark…

All covered all over with hickory bark…

 

He boarded some animals, two of each kind…

Birds, snakes and jiggy-bugs, he didn't mind…

 

The bull and the cow, they started to row

And the little black dog went ‘rowdy-dow-dow!’

 

Then said old Noah with a crack of his whip…

“Come stop this row or I'll scuttle the ship”…

 

But the bull put his horn through the side of the ark…

And the little black dog he started to bark…

 

So Noah took the dog, shoved its nose in the hole…

And ever since then, dog’s nose has been cold…

 

It's a long, long time, and a very long time…

A long, long time, and a very long time…


 

 

Nora Lee 🔊

 

 


An Irish folk song. In the USA it is sung as ‘Aura Lee’, a minstrel song from the American Civil War which was published in 1861, and more recently as the more familiar ‘Love me Tender’. Find out more at: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8275 .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


All beside a small green hill,

'Neath a rowan tree,

Sang a blackbird low and sweet,

Sang of Nora Lee.

Chorus

Nora Lee, Nora Lee,

Laughing through the fair,

Springtime goes the way you walk

And swallows in the air.

 

In your blush the rose was born,

In your voice a song,

Your soft eyes a bright blue star,

Lost its light among.

 

When the mistletoe is green,

Midst the winter snows,

Sunshine in your face is seen,

In your cheeks the rose.

 

Though beside the small green hill,

No glad bird may sing,

In my heart your song endures,

Take my golden ring.


 

 

Norwegian milking song O

 

 


I was asked to video and add this song to my website collection by a young mother from Malta.

I know nothing about it apart from the words and music and would be very grateful for any information about its Norwegian origin. It would be lovely to see it in the Norwegian language and also to acknowledge the translator.

Arrangement by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Come cows to the song of my calling,

The day is done, the night draws near,

Come cows for the shadows are falling,

I call you one by one;

Come Daisy, come Maisie,

Come Marigold, Buttercup, Beautiful Sue,

Come Milky and Silky and Flowering May,

Come you, come you, come you.

 

 

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