Song cupboard M

Magic penny

Make new friends

Mama Paquita

Mango walk

Mary Ann

May Day in the morning

May there always be sunshine

Me grandfather died

Mi caballo blanco / My white horse

Mingulay boat song

Mole in the ground

Morningtown ride

Moscow nights

Mr. Grumps

My Aunt Jane

My big black dog

My boat / a little stick

My bonnie lies over the ocean

My father had a horse

My nipa hut

My shadow

My singing bird

Last updated: 4/19/2021 10:28 AM

The songs below are part ofAway we go

compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

Return to the ‘Singing games for children’ home

To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

Magic penny O

 

 


A favourite in school assemblies with words and music by the wonderful Malvina Reynolds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chorus

Love is something if you give it away,

Give it away, give it away.

Love is something if you give it away,

You end up having more.

 

It's just like a magic penny;

Hold it tight and you won't have any;

Lend it, spend it, and you'll have so many,

They'll roll all over the floor.(for)

Chorus

 

So let's go dancing till the break of day.

And if there's a piper, we can pay.

For love is something if you give it away,

You end up having more. (for)

Chorus

 


 

 

Make new friends O

 

 


A popular song in the world of scouting where new friendships are there for making everyday. It can also be sung as a four part round.

Watch a very young graduation class sing this song with actions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zeVBzbELoS4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Make new friends, but keep the old.

One is silver and the other gold.

 

A circle is round, it has no end.

That's how long, I will be your friend.

 

A fire burns bright, it warms the heart.

We've been friends, from the very start.

 

You have one hand, I have the other.

Put them together, we have each other.

 

Silver is precious, gold is too.

I am precious, and so are you.

 

You help me, and I'll help you

And together we will see it through.

 

The sky is blue, the Earth is green,

I can help to keep it clean.

 

Across the land, across the sea,

Friends forever we will always be.


 

 

Mama Paquita 🔊

 

 


We may be poor but we can still dance and sing.

In Brazil Carnival is held in the days at the start of Lent before Ash Wednesday.

I found this song in Silver Burdett’s ‘Music’ Bk1, however there is a big question mark about its authenticity from the original version in the Portuguese language: https://www.mamalisa.com/blog/mama-paquita-a-brazilian-carnival-song/ .

However, it is still a lovely, cheerful, uplifting song based on the original Brazilian Mamae Eu Quero’ that allows children to appreciate and enjoy its lively rhythm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mama Paquita, Mama Paquita,

Mama Paquita, buy your baby a papaya,

A ripe papaya and a banana,

A ripe banana that your baby will enjoy, ma-ma-ma-ma,

Mama Paquita, Mama Paquita,

Mama Paquita says, “I haven’t any money

To buy papayas and ripe bananas,

Let’s go to Carnival and dance the night away!”

 

Mama Paquita, Mama Paquita,

Mama Paquita, buy your baby some pajamas,

Some new pajamas, and a sombrero,

A new sombrero that your baby will enjoy, ma-ma-ma-ma,

Mama Paquita, Mama Paquita,

Mama Paquita says, “I haven’t any money

To buy pajamas, and a sombrero,

Let’s go to Carnival and dance the night away!”

 


 

 

Mango walk 🔊

 

 


‘Mango walk’ is a grove where the mangos grow, the number eleven mango is the best quality, a big juicy variety.

In the late 1960s I taught in Handsworth, Birmingham where there was a wonderful mix of recent immigrants. Many children in my class had parents who had come from Jamaica, they bought with them their joyous calypso songs that featured regularly on the television and of course in the classroom. This was one I remember well, I have slightly adapted it: Singing Together, Spring 1970, BBC Publications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My brother did-a tell me that you go mango walk,

You go mango walk, you go mango walk,

My brother did-a tell me that you go mango walk

And steal all the number 'leven.

 

Now tell me, Joe, do tell me for true,

Do tell me for true, Do tell me for true

That you don't go to no mango walk

And steal all the number 'leven.

 

My mother Dita tell me that you go mango walk,

You go mango walk, you go mango walk

My mother Dita tell me that you go mango walk

And eat all the number 'leven.

 

I tell you, Sue, I tell you for true,

I tell you for true, I tell you

That I don't go to no mango walk

And eat all the number 'leven.


 

 

 

Mary Ann 🔊

 

 


A wistful song of loss and good times gone but also of hope to come.

From my college folk club days many years ago. My memory has ensured that though this tune is similar to the version I sang then, the words have changed to fit the present circumstances.

Find out more versions at: https://mainlynorfolk.info/cyril.tawney/songs/maryann.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, fare thee well, my own true love,

Fare thee well, my dear;

For the ship is a-waiting and the wind blows high,

For I am bound away for the sea, Mary Ann,

For I am bound away for the sea, Mary Ann.

 

Oh, don't you see the pretty turtle dove,

That flies from pine to pine;

It cries, how it cries for its own true love,

As I will cry for mine, my dear Mary Ann,

As I will cry for mine, my dear Mary Ann.

 

The lobster boiling in the pot,

The crayfish on the line;

They're suffering long, but it's nothing like

The ache I bear for thee, my dear Mary Ann,

The ache I bear for thee, my dear Mary Ann.

 

Oh, fare thee well, my dear Mary Ann,

Our days have all gone by;

Springtime has come and I’ll soon be gone,

But, I'll come back for you, my dear Mary Ann,

But, I'll come back for you, my dear Mary Ann.


 

 

May Day in the morning O

 

 


Though this is described as traditional and an American version of a Scottish rhyme in Elizabeth Poston’s ‘The Children’s song book’ I have been unable to find another version of this song on the internet. The words however pop up in many folk songs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a crane sat on a stone,

He flew away and there was none;

Another came and there was one,

‘Twas May Day in the morning.

 

There was a cat skinned up a tree,

To see whatever was to see,

When he fell down, then down fell he,

‘Twas May Day in the morning.

 

There was a rooster in a trough,

Who got a touch of whooping cough,

He sneezed his tail and feathers off,

‘Twas May Day in the morning.

 

There was a farmer made a wish,

That he could swim like any fish,

They popped him in a chafing dish,

‘Twas May Day in the morning.


 

 

May there always be sunshine  🔊

 

 


A song inspired by a young child and written in a 1962 Soviet Russia full of hope for the future and a desire for peace. You can find many versions of this song including those in Russian and other languages. Verses 3-4 adapted by Dany Rosevear.

Find out more at: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=3885 .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


May there always be sunshine,

May there always be blue skies,

May there always be Mama,

May there always be me!

 

May there always be sunshine,

May there always be blue skies,

May there always be Papa,

May there always be me!

 

May there always be laughter,

May there always be kindness,

May there always be good friends,

May there always be you.

 

As the Spring follows Winter,

Winter follows the Fall,

We look forward to Summer,

And the wonder of it all!

 

May there always be sharing,

May there always be caring,

May there always be singing,

And dreams of peace across the world.


 

 

Mi caballo blanco / My white horse 🔊

 

 


This song from Chile was popularised by Fancisco Flores del Campo and is about friendship and freedom; it celebrates the relationship between the cowboy and his horse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


He is my faithful white horse,

Bright as the rising sun,

Always we are together,

Friends as we travel on.

 

Mi caballo, mi caballo, galopando va,

Mi caballo, mi caballo, se va y se va.

Ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, Ah, ah, ah, ah-ay!

Ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, ah, Ah, ah, ah, ah-ay!

 

On wings of joy we gallop,

My horse steadfast and kind,

And in the arms of sorrow,

Comfort we’ll surely find.


 

 

Mingulay boat song 🔊

 

 


The original song was composed by Hugh Robertson using a traditional tune and appeared in his ‘Songs of the Isles’ published in 1938. There are many, many versions of this song where both words and tune of the verses differ, the chorus is rarely altered. Find out more at: https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9698

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Heel ya ho, boys, let her go, boys;

Bring her head round, now all together,

Heel ya ho, boys, let her go boys;

Sailing home, home to Mingulay.

 

What care we though, white the Minch is?

What care we for wind or weather?

Swing her head round, ev'ry inch is

Sailing homeward to Mingulay.

 

Bairns are laughing, wives are waiting,

Looking seawards from hills of heather,

Pull her round now, then we’ll anchor,

As the sun sets on Mingulay.

 

Bairns are sleeping in the cradle,

Rocking gently by the fireside;

There's a candle in the window,

As we turn now to Mingualay.


 

 

 

Mole in the ground 🔊

 

 


The version below is for children, the classic song is by Bascom Lunsford.

Find out more at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18014   

Encourage children to make up their own verses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I wish I was a mole in the ground,

Yes, I wish I was a mole in the ground,

If I’s a mole in the ground,

I'd root that mountain down,

And I wish I was a mole in the ground.

 

I wish I was a lizard in the spring.

Yes, I wish I was a lizard in the spring,

If I’s a lizard in the spring,

I’d hear my darlin’ sing,

And I wish I was a lizard in the spring.

 

I wish I was a bird in the sky,

Yes, I wish I was a bird in the sky,

If I’s a bird in the sky,

I’d spread my wings and fly,

And I wish I was a bird in the sky.

 

I wish I was a trout in the creek,

Yes, I wish I was a trout in the creek,

If I's a trout in the creek,

Clear water I would seek,

And I wish I was a trout in the creek.

 

I wish I was a frog in the pond,

Yes, I wish I was a frog in the pond,

If I's a frog in the pond,

I’d sing the whole night long,

And I wish I was a frog in the pond.


 

 

 

Morningtown ride O

 

A lullaby; words and music by Malvina Reynolds. This version was adapted by The Seekers. Add children’s names to personalise this song in the second verse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Train whistle blowin',

Makes a sleepy noise;

Underneath their blankets,

Go all the girls and boys.

 

Chorus

Rockin', rollin', ridin',

Out along the bay,

All bound for Morningtown,

Many miles away.

 

Driver at the engine,

Fireman rings the bell;

Sandman swings the lantern

To show that all is well.

Chorus

 

Maybe it is raining

Where our train will ride;

All the little travellers

Are warm and snug inside.

Chorus

 

Somewhere there is sunshine,

Somewhere there is day;

Somewhere there is Morningtown

Many miles away. x2

Chorus

 


 

 

Moscow nights 🔊

 

 


My Russian grandmother came from St. Petersburg and gave me a love of Russian minor key tunes; this infectious one, though not a folk song, is instantly recognisable as Russian. The lovely English translation is by Jerry Silverman.

The composer Vasily Solovyov-Sedoi and the poet Mikhail Matusovsky wrote the song in 1955 with the title ‘Leningradskie Vechera’or ’Leningrad Nights’, but at the request of the Soviet Ministry of Culture changed the title to ‘Podmoskovnye Vechera,’ is literally, ‘Evenings in the Moscow Suburbs’.

Find out more at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moscow_Nights

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Stillness in the grove, not a rustling sound;

Softly shines the moon clear and bright.

Dear, if you could know how I treasure so

This most beautiful Moscow night.

 

Lazily the brook, like a silv’ry stream,

Ripples gently in the moonlight;

And song afar fades as in a dream

In the spell of this summer night.

 

Dearest, why so sad, why the downcast eyes,

And your lovely head bend so low?

Oh, it's hard to speak, and yet not to speak

Of the longing my heart does know.

 

Promise me, my love, as the dawn appears

And the darkness turns into light,

That you'll cherish, dear, through the passing years,

This most beautiful Moscow night.


 

 

 

Me grandfather died O

 

I have been unable to find any information about this Irish song. I originally got this adapted version from the BBC radio’s Music Box programme in the 1980s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Me grandfather died and he left me a mule,

A silly old mule and he followed me to school.

Chorus

And it’s ee-aye-addy-o,

Mammy and your daddy-o,

Ee-aye-addy-o,

Down at the Lucan dairy.

 

Me grandfather died and he left me a pig,

A fat little pig and he danced me a jig.

Chorus

 

Me grandfather died and he left me a hen

A fat little hen and she laid now and then.

Chorus

 

Me grandfather died and he left me a drake

A fat little drake, he was swallowed by a snake.

Chorus

 


 

 

Mi caballo blanco / My white horse 🔊

 

 


This song from Chile was popularised by Fancisco Flores del Campo and is about friendship and freedom; it celebrates the close relationship between the cowboy and his horse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


He is my faithful white horse,

Bright as the rising sun,

Always we are together,

Friends as we travel on.

 

Mi caballo, mi caballo, galopando va,

Mi caballo, mi caballo, se va y se va.

 

On wings of joy we gallop,

My horse steadfast and kind,

And in the arms of sorrow,

Comfort we’ll surely find.


 

 

Mr. Grumps 🔊

 

 


Life isn’t always perfect but a smile and a song help to make the world a little brighter.

I have changed the characters name from ‘Mr. Grouch’ which is no longer a well used word.

Another from ‘Child-land in song and rhythm’

Words: Harriet Blanche Jones. Music: Florence Newell Barbour 1866 – 1946.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Just carry a smile in your pocket,

To drive Mr. Grumps away,

He will not stay long if you’re singing a song,

And he doesn’t like smiles, they say.


 

 

 

My Aunt Jane O

 

 


A skipping song from streets of Belfast, many of the verses are not as ‘clean’ as these!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My Aunt Jane she took me in,

She gave me tea out of her wee tin.

Half a bap with sugar on the top,

Three black lumps out of her wee shop.

Half a bap with sugar on the top,

Three black lumps out of her wee shop.

 

My Aunt Jane she's awful smart,

She bakes wee rings in an apple tart.

And when Halloween comes round,

For next that tart I'm always found.

And when Halloween comes round,

For next that tart I'm always found.

 

My Aunt Jane has a bell on the door,

A white stone step and a clean swept floor.

Candy apples, hard green pears,

Conversation lozenges.

Candy apples, hard green pears,

Conversation lozenges.

 

My Aunt Jane she can dance a jig,

Sing a song ‘round a sweetie pig.

Wee red eyes and a cord for a tail,

Hanging in a bunch from a crooked nail.

Wee red eyes and a cord for a tail,

Hanging in a bunch from a crooked nail.

 

My Aunt Jane she never cross,

She paid five shillings for an old wooden horse.

She jumped on its back, the bones let a crack,

You’ll play the fiddle till I get back.

She jumped on its back the bones let a crack,

You’ll play the fiddle till I get back.

 

My Aunt Jane she took me in,

She gave me tea out of her wee tin.

Half a bap, a wee sugar top,

Three black lumps out of her wee shop.

Half a bap, a wee sugar top,

Three black lumps out of her wee shop.

 


 

 

My big black dog O

 

Described in ‘Just five’ pentatonic songs by Dr. Robert E. Kersey as an English play song but I have been unable to find a song associated with it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whoever took my big black dog,

I wish they bring him back!

He chased the big chicks over the fence

And the little chicks through the crack!

The big chicks over the fence

And the little chicks through the crack!

Whoever took my big black dog,

I wish they'd bring him back!


 

 

My boat, a little stick 🔊

 

 


This Russian folk tune is used in Stavinsky’s Firebird music.

The song comes from ‘Sing around the world’ published by the Cooperative Recreation Service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Little river, ever flowing, ever going,

Through the meadow to the forest there below;

But beyond how far? And where do you go?

 

Here my boat, a little stick I send a-floating,

It would travel for a hundred miles or more;

Who will find it there as it goes ashore?

 


 

 

 

My bonnie lies over the ocean O

 

You can find out more about this popular Scottish folk song at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Bonnie_Lies_over_the_Ocean.

 

For a lively bit of fun stand up or sit down each time a word beginning with ‘b’ is sung. Thereafter sing faster.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My bonnie lies over the ocean,

My bonnie lies over the sea,

My bonnie lies over the ocean,

Oh, bring back my bonnie to me.

 

Chorus

Bring back, bring back,

Oh, bring back my bonnie to me, to me,

Bring back, bring back,

Bring back my bonnie to me.

 

Last night as I lay on my pillow,

Last night as I lay on my bed,

Last night as I lay on my pillow,

I dreamt that my bonnie was dead.

Chorus

 

Oh blow ye winds over the ocean,

Oh blow ye winds over the sea,

Oh blow ye winds over the ocean,

And bring back my bonnie to me.

Chorus

 

The winds have blown over the ocean,

The winds have blown over the sea,

The winds have blown over the ocean,

And brought back my bonnie to me.

Chorus

 


 

 

My father had a horse O

 

 


This sporting song came from ‘Cornish dialects and folk songs’ by Ralph Dunstan who recorded this from the singing of Mr. Jim Thomas in Camborne: October 21st 1931.

Chords added by Dany Rosevear.

‘jole’ is the Cornish dialect for ‘jolt’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh, my father had a horse,

And my mother had a mare,

My brother had a dog,

And my sister had a hare.

 

So t’was a ride on the horse,

And a jole from the mare;

Sporting with the dog,

When a-chasing of the hare.

 

My father had an ox,

And my mother had a cow,

My brother had a pig,

And my sister had a sow;

We had beef from the ox,

And milk from the cow,

And bacon from the pig,

And piglets from the sow.

Refrain

 

My father had a rooster,

And my mother had a hen,

My brother had a robin,

And my sister had a wren;

The rooster he did crow,

And we had eggs from the hen,

A song from the robin,

And another from the wren.

Refrain


 

 

My nipa hut  🔊

 

 


A song from the Phillipines. Bahay Kub’ means cubed house but the translation refers to the nipa palm leaves and bamboo from which it is constructed. These houses have just one room. The song was composed when the first American teachers, arrived in the Philippines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My nipa hut, is very small,

But the plants in the garden grow healthy and tall;

There are turnips and eggplants, and beans in a row,

And tomatoes and garlic we grow.

 

There's pumpkin, squash, yellow, orange and white,

Peanuts, radish and onion all give us delight.

Ginger, mustard, cucumber, and tender green peas,

And around plants with sesame seeds.


 

 

 

My shadow O

 

 


Shadow play is great fun outside when the sun is shining; this song makes a good introduction.

The tune is a familiar one ‘My Hat it has three corners’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My shadow’s always with me

No matter where I go.

My pace it’s always keeping;

If I move fast or slow.

 

It’s size it’s always changing,

Sometimes it shoots up tall;

And then again it dwindles

Until it’s very small.

 

But though it’s very friendly,

And loves with me to stay,

My funny little shadow

Has not a word to say.


 

 

My singing bird  🔊

 

 


An Irish folk song that was very popular in the 1960s. The melody is from a Munster folk tune and the words by an Irish poet, Edith Wheeler.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I have seen the lark soar high at morn

Heard its song up in the blue.

I have heard the blackbird pipe its tune,

And the thrush and the linnet too.

But there's none of them can sing so sweet

My singing bird as you,

Aah-aah-aah-aah, aah-aah-aah-aah,

My singing bird as you.

 

If I could lure my singing bird

From its own cozy nest,

If I could catch my singing bird,

I would warm it on my breast.

For there's none of them can sing so sweet…


 

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