Song cupboard L 1

Land of the silver birch

Last night as I lay sleeping

Lazy coconut tree

Leave her Johnny

Let’s all sing like the birdies sing

Let’s go fly a kite

Little Bingo

Little bird on my window

Little black bull / Hoosen Johnny

Little David play on your harp

Little John will be gone

Little Peter Rabbit

Little Rabbit Foo-Foo

Little red fox

 

Last updated: 9/11/2018 5:04 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we go

compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

Return to the Singing games for children’ home

To listen to music from these songs click on O

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

 

Land of the silver birch O

 

 


A haunting song from Canada sung when paddling a canoe to keep a steady pace; indeed it is often paired with 'My paddle’s keen and bright'.

 

The Singing Together Autumn 1971 version goesHi-a-ya, hi-ya. Hi-a-ya, hi-ya, Hi-a-ya, hi-ya, Ah!’ I presume the refrain below is a Canadian Scouting one.

Find many other variations on the wonderful Mudcat. Site: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=5721#2639896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Land of the silver birch, home of the beaver,

Where still the mighty moose wanders at will.

Blue lake and rocky shore, I will return once more.

Boom-diddy-ah-da, Boom-diddy-ah-da, Boom-diddy-ah-da, boom!

 

High on a rocky ledge, I’ll set my wigwam,

Close to the water’s edge, silent and still.

Blue lake and rocky shore, I will return once more.

Boom-diddy-ah-da, Boom-diddy-ah-da, Boom-diddy-ah-da, boom!

 

Down in the forest’s glade, deep in the lowlands,

My heart cries out for thee, hills of the north.

Blue lake and rocky shore, I will return once more.

Boom-diddy-ah-da, Boom-diddy-ah-da, Boom-diddy-ah-da, boom!

 

Swift as the silver fish, my canoe of birch bark,

Thy mighty waterways carry me forth.

Blue lake and rocky shore, I will return once more.

Boom-diddy-ah-da, Boom-diddy-ah-da,

Boom-diddy-ah-da, boom!

 


 

 

 

Last night as I lay sleeping O

 

A great song for making up more verses to rhyme with the names of other real or imaginary islands: Corfu / canoe, Sark / Noah’s ark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Last night as I lay sleeping,

I dreamed that I was sailing

To the Isle of Man

On a frying pan

And back again by morning.

 

Last night as I lay sleeping,

I dreamed that I was flying

To the Isle of Wight

On a big red kite

And back again by morning.

 

Last night as I lay sleeping,

I dreamed that I was floating

To the Isle of Skye

On an apple pie

And back again by morning.

 


 

 

Lazy coconut tree O

 

This great calypso song was written by J.Edwards with music by D.Coombes for BBC radio’s Time and Tune programme in 1971.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Some folk like to go fishing,

Far across the bay.

I would rather be dreaming,

On the beach all day.

 

Chorus

Like the lazy co-co-coconut,

Co-co-coconut tree,

Like the lazy co-co-coconut,

Co-co-coconut tree.

 

Some folk work in the jungle,

Till the day is done.

I can keep myself busy,

Dozing in the sun.

Chorus

 

I could  be a rich merchant,

In some fine bazaar.

But I’d rather be happy,

Nodding to a star.

Chorus

 

 


 

 

Leave her Johnny O

 

 


Sailors were at sea a long time and this halyard shanty was sung the homeward voyage after all the jobs were done and as they pulled the ship into the dock.

 

I first came across this song in BBC radio’s ‘Singing together’ Summer 1968. The verses below are similar to the ones found there. The version here, however, has a chorus, one that is popularly sung in folk clubs in the Southwest of England to the present day. The refrain is in italics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I thought I heard the Old Man say,

Leave her Johnny, leave her!

Tomorrow you will get your pay,

And it's time for us to leave her.

 

Leave her, Johnny, leave her,

Oh, leave her Johnny, leave her!

For the voyage is done and the winds don't blow,

And it's time for us to leave her!

 

The work was hard and the passage long…

The seas were high and the gales were strong…

 

Oh, the grub was bad and the wages low…

But now ashore again we’ll go…

 

The sails are furled and our work is done…

And homeward now we’ve made our run…

 


 

 

Let’s all sing like the birdies sing 🔊

 

 


A song to have fun with. Written by Robert Hargreaves, Stanley J. Damerell and Tolchard Evans in 1932. I remember listening to it on the old records as a child in the early 1950s.

New words Dany Rosevear; be sure to make up your own new verses, it’s easy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Let's all sing like the birdies sing,

“Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! Tweet!”

Let's all sing like the birdies sing,

“Sweet! Sweet! Sweet! Sweet! Sweet!”

Let's all warble like nightingales,

Give your throat a treat.

Take your time from the birds,

Now you all know the words,

“Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! Tweet! Tweet!”

 

“Quack! Quack! Quack! Quack! Quack!”…

Round the lake and back…

 

“Cuckoo! Cuckoo! Cuckoo!”…

Way up there in the blue…

 

“Cock-a-doodle-doo!”…

“Good morning, good morning to you!”

 


 

 

 

Let’s go fly a kite O

 

 


A big favourite from the 1964 Disney film "Mary Poppins". Composed by Robert B. Sherman and Richard M. Sherman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


With tuppence for paper and strings,

You can have your own set of wings.

With your feet on the ground,

You're a bird in a flight,

With your fist holding tight

To the string of your kite!

 

Oh, oh, oh!

Let's go fly a kite

Up to the highest height!

Let's go fly a kite and send it soaring

Up through the atmosphere,

Up where the air is clear.

Oh, let's go fly a kite!

 

When you send it flyin' up there,

All at once you're lighter than air!

You can dance on the breeze,

Over 'ouses and trees,

With your fist 'olding tight

To the string of your kite!

 


 

 

Little Bingo 🔊

 

 


I love this variation of an original traditional song, it was recorded by Canada’s Alan Mills on his CD ‘15 numbers, letters and animal songs’.

The more familiar modern version and clapping game, Bobby Bingo, can be found at: http://www.singinggamesforchildren.com/A%20Cluster%202.2%20Awaywego/12%20Nursery%20favourites.htm 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a farmer had a young dog,

His name was little Bingo,

B with an I, I with an N,

N with a G, G with an O;

B, I, N,G, O!

His name was little Bingo.

 

The farmer had a very good voice,

And he did like to sing-o,

S with an I, I with an N,

N with a G, G with an O;

S, I, N,G, O!

And he did like to sing-o.

 

The farmer loved a pretty young maid,

He bought her a wedding ring-o,

R with an I, I with an N,

N with a G, G with an O;

R, I, N,G, O!

He bought her a wedding ring-o.

 

The wedding bells so merrily rang,

A-ting-a-ting-a-tingo,

T with an I, I with an N,

N with a G, G with an O;

T, I, N,G, O!

A-ting-a-ting-a-tingo.

 

Then off they went to London town,

To see the queen and king-o,

K with an I, I with an N,

N with a G, G with an O;

K, I, N,G, O!

To see the queen and king-o.

 

And is this not a jolly good song?

I think it is, by jingo.

J with an I, I with an N,

N with a G, G with an O;

J, I, N,G, O!

I think it is, by jingo.

 


 

 

 

Little bird on my window O

 

 


I believe this is an old Irish song but this and other versions have been sung in the U.S.A. by grandparents and in elementary schools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Little bird on my window,

Won’t you sing me a song?

As you fly over meadows

Won’t you bring me along?

 

There are beautiful flowers

To be seen from up high,

Won’t you please take me with you,

Little bird as you fly.

 

Little bird on my window

May your song never end,

I will tell you a secret,

You're my very best friend.

 


 

 

Little black bull / Hoosen Johnny 🔊

 

 


A folk song from Illinois.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The little black bull came down the meadow,

Hoosen Johnny, Hoosen Johnny,

The little black bull came down the meadow, long time ago.

Long time ago, long time ago,

The little black bull came down the meadow, long time ago.

 

First he pawed and then he bellowed,

Hoosen Johnny, Hoosen Johnny,

First he pawed and then he bellowed, long time ago…

 

He whet his horn on a white oak sapling…

 

He shook his tail, he jarred the river…

 

He wink his eye at the little red heifer …

 

He pawed the dirt in the heifer’s face…

 


 

 

 

 

Little David play on your harp O

 

A lively happy song that has a great rhythm.

There are other versions of this that include other characters from the bible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chorus

Little David play on your harp, Hallelu! Hallelu!

Little David play on your harp, Hallelu!

Repeat

 

Little David was a shepherd boy,

He killed Goliath and he shouted for joy.

 

Joshua was the son of Nun,

He never quit till his work was done.

 

Little David was a mighty king,

And all the people started to sing.

 

Little David played, he danced and sang,

‘Till all the bells of heaven rang.

 


 

 

Little John will be gone 🔊

 

 


Hearing the traditional German folk tune ‘Hänschen klein, geht allein’ when singing the song ‘Chickadee’, a song came to mind that was was taught at my teacher training college in the 1960s and which I then used in the classroom in my early days of teaching. Fortunately I recorded the words in a little notebook at that time as it does not appear to be be recorded anywhere on the internet.

You can find the German words at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hänschen_klein

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Little John will be gone,

Out into the world alone.

And his kit, seems to fit

And he’s proud of it.

But his mother has a cry,

When it’s time to say goodbye,

I will pray every day,

Don’t be long away.

 

Weeks fly past and at last,

Seven years, abroad have past,

Time has come to fly home,

John has ceased to roam.

Can the boy we knew before,

Be this man outside the door;

Sunburnt brown, greatly grown,

Will he still be known.

 

One, two, three, John they see,

Do not know who he might be.

Sister says: “Here’s a face

Which I cannot place.”

Then his mother hurries in,

Only takes one look at him,

Shouts with joy, “John my boy,

Welcome home my son.”

 


 

 

Little Peter Rabbit O

 

This is similar to the version I learnt as a child. ‘Floppy ears and curly whiskers’ is the more usual chorus on the other side of the Atlantic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Little Peter Rabbit had a fly upon his nose,

Little Peter Rabbit had a fly upon his nose,

Little Peter Rabbit had a fly upon his nose,

So he flipped it and he flopped it

And the fly flew away.

 

Chorus

Powder puffs and curly whiskers,

Powder puffs and curly whiskers,

Powder puffs and curly whiskers,

So he flipped it and he flopped it

And the fly flew away.

 

Little Peter Rabbit had a fly upon his ear…

Chorus

 

Little Peter Rabbit had a fly upon his paw…

Chorus

 

Little Peter Rabbit had a fly upon his mouth,

Little Peter Rabbit had a fly upon his mouth,

Little Peter Rabbit had a fly upon his mouth,

So he swillowed it and swallowed it

And the fly went away!

Hands make rabbit ears on head then cross to make the fly, lastly a finger points to the nose. Repeat three times.

Swish one hand then the other.

Crossed hands fly away.

 

Pat behind twice then hands twirl downwards. Repeat three times.

 

As before.

 

 

Repeat as before but point to the named part of the body.


 

Little Rabbit Foo-Foo O

 

 


A community story song with actions and sound effects.

 

Line 1: Wiggle two fingers on each side of the head / fists move back and forth.

2: Scoop with one hand and ‘bop’ with one fist on the other.

3: Flap crossed hands downwards.

4 – 5: Repeat above but make circles with thumbs and forefingers to make glasses for ‘see you’ instead of hopping movement and shake head.

6: Hold three fingers, clap three times and shake finger.

7: Wave wand above head. Pull a funny face.

Continue as above for each verse. Last time wave wand round three times.

 

 

 


Little Rabbit Foo-Foo hopping through the forest,

Scooping up the field-mice and bopping them on the head.

Spoken: Along came the Good Fairy, who said:

"Little Rabbit Foo-Foo, I don't want to see you

Scooping up the field-mice and bopping them on the head.

Spoken: I'll give you three chances to change and if you don't behave I'll turn you into a… Goo-oo-oonie!”

 

Little Rabbit Foo-Foo hopping through the forest,

Scooping up the wriggley worms and bopping them on the head.

Spoken: Along came the Good Fairy, who said:

"Little Rabbit Foo-Foo, I don't want to see you

Scooping up the wriggley worms and bopping them on the head.

Spoken: I'll give you two more chances to change and if you don't behave I'll turn you into a… Goo-oo-oonie!”

 

Little Rabbit Foo-Foo hopping through the forest,

Scooping up the tigers and bopping them on the head.

Spoken: Along came the Good Fairy, who said:

"Little Rabbit Foo-Foo, I don't want to see you

Scooping up the tigers and bopping them on the head.

Spoken: I'll give you one more chance to change and if you don't behave I'll turn you into a… Goo-oo-oonie!”

 

Little Rabbit Foo-Foo hopping through the forest,

Scooping up the goblins and bopping them on the head.

Spoken: Along came the Good Fairy, who said:

"Little Rabbit Foo-Foo, I don't want to see you

Scooping up the goblins and bopping them on the head.

Spoken: I gave you three chances to change and you still didn't behave!"

She waved her magic wand round three times and POW!

She turned him into a… Goo-oo-oonie!”

 

And the moral of the story is:

"Hare today - Goonie tomorrow!"

 


 

 

Little red fox 🔊

 

 


A song from Ireland ‘ An Maidrín Rua’ in Irish. It was made famous by the Clancy Brothers; this version was inspired by Connie Cullen. Find out more at Mudcat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The little red fox, red fox, red fox,

The little red fox came creeping,

The little red fox came a-creeping through the rocks,

And the tips of his two ears peeping.

 

The little red fox is a raider sly,

In the misty moonlight creeping;

With a morsel to his taste he hurries off in haste,

While the farmyard's soundly sleeping.

 

The little red fox, red fox, red fox,

The little red fox, none bolder,

The little red fox, came a-creeping through the rocks,

With a fat goose over his shoulder.

 

''A duck!'' says he, ''Has charms for me,

Likewise a young cock crowing;

But a fine fat goose is most of use,

To a family young and growing.''

 

The little red fox, red fox, red fox,

The little red fox, none bolder,

The little red fox, came a-creeping through the rocks,

With a fat goose over his shoulder.

 

Chorus in Irish:

An maidrín a rua, rua, rua, rua, rua,

An maidrín a rua tá grána,

An maidrín rua na luí sa luachair,

Is barr a dhá chluas in airde.

 


 

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