Song cupboard B

Bananas in pyjamas

Be happy, be happy today!

Big Rock Candy Mountain

Bill Grogan’s goat

Billy Boy

Blow away the morning dew

Boatman dance, boatman sing

Bobby Shaftoe

Bought me a cat

Brush, brush, brush

By the light of the silvery moon

Last updated: 2/19/2019 5:01 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we go’ Round and about

compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

Return to the Singing games for children’ home

To listen to music from these songs click on O or 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.

 


 

 

Bananas in pyjamas O

 

 


Words and music by Carey Blyton (nephew of Enid Blyton) in 1967.This crazy song became a regular favourite on Australia’s Playschool. Find out more at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bananas_in_Pyjamas, http://www.careyblyton.com/??=Bananas

 

For more fun add other fruit and veggie verses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bananas, in pyjamas,

Are coming down the stairs;

Bananas, in pyjamas,

Are coming down in pairs;

Bananas, in pyjamas,

Are chasing teddy bears -

'Cos on Tuesdays

They all try to

CATCH them unawares!

 

Zucchinis in bikinis… are sliding…

Green beans in blue jeans… are running…

Potatoes in their jackets... are hopping….

 


 

 

Be happy, be happy today! 🔊

 

 


A song written in 1935 and published in ‘The nursery song and picture book published in 1947. Words and music by Miriam Drury. The seasonal lines below were written by Dany Rosevear. Some might prefer the simple original verse:

I saw a bird in the top of a tree,

This is the song he was singing to me,

“God loves us all in a wonderful way,

Be happy, be happy today.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I saw a bird in the top of a tree,

This is the song it was singing to me,

“The world is awake and the sun’s out to play:

Be happy, be happy today,

Be happy, be happy today!”

 

I saw a bird in the top of a tree,

This is the song it was singing to me,

“Lovely Autumn has come, watch the leaves fly away:

Be happy, be happy today…

 

I saw a bird in the top of a tree,

This is the song it was singing to me,

“The snow fell all night, soft and white as it lay,

Be happy, be happy today…

 

I saw a bird in the top of a tree,

This is the song it was singing to me,

“Now Springtime has come, all the flowers smile and say:

Be happy, be happy today…


 

 

Bill Grogan’s goat 🔊

 

 


A comic echo song.

It was a popular Burl Ives song and possibly originated from Ireland as ‘O’Grady’s goat’ https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=53457 .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a man There was a man

Now please take note Now please take note

There was a man There was a man

Who had a goat. Who had a goat.

He loved that goat He loved that goat

Indeed he did Indeed he did

He loved that goat He loved that goat

Just like a kid. Just like a kid.

 

One day that goat One day that goat

Felt frisk and fine Felt frisk and fine

Ate three red shirts Ate three red shirts

Right off the line. Right off the line.

The man, he grabbed The man, he grabbed

Him by the back Him by the back

And tied him to And tied him to

A railroad track. A railroad track

 

Now, when that train Now, when that train

Hove into sight Hove into sight

That goat grew pale That goat grew pale

And green with fright. And green with fright.

He heaved a sigh He heaved a sigh

As if in pain As if in pain

Coughed up those shirts Coughed up those shirts

And flagged the train! And flagged the train!


 

 

Big Rock Candy Mountain O

 

 


This song was written by the hobo singer Henry ‘Mac’ McClintock to warn off young folk seduced by the supposed nirvana of the wandering life.

 

The version below has a lighter tone describing a land of milk and honey to feed younger more innocent imaginations before they need get to grips with the difficult life of a hobo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


In the Big Rock Candy Mountain,

There's a land that's fair and bright,

Where the handouts grow on bushes,

And you sleep out ev'ry night,

Where the boxcars are all empty,

And the sun shines ev'ry day,

Oh I’m bound to go, where there ain't no snow,

Where the rain don't fall and the winds don't blow,

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain.

 

Oh, the buzzin’ of the bees in the peppermint trees,

‘Round the soda water fountain,

Near the lemonade springs where the bluebird sings,

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain.

 

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain,

All the frogs have wooden legs,

The bulldogs all have rubber teeth,

And the hens lay soft-boiled eggs.

The farmer's trees are full of fruit,

And the barns are full of hay.

Oh I’m bound to go, where there ain't no snow,

Where the rain don't fall and the winds don't blow,

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain.

 

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain,

You never change your socks,

And little streams of lemonade,

Come a-tricklin' down the rocks.

The hobos there are friendly,

And their fires all burn bright,

There's a lake of stew and ginger ale too,

You can paddle all around it in a big canoe,

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain.


 

 

Billy Boy O

 

I have had fun trying to recall this song I sang at a Norfolk school in the 1950s not so successfully. This is more or less as I remember it and put together with a little help from the internet!

It has a Roud number 326.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Where have you been all the day, Billy Boy, Billy Boy?

Where have you been all the day, charming Billy?

I have been to seek a wife, she’s the idol of my life,

She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother.

 

Did she ask you to come in, Billy Boy, Billy Boy? Did she ask you to come in, charming Billy?

Yes, she asked me to come in, there's a dimple on her chin.

She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother.

 

Can she make a cherry pie…

She can make a cherry pie in the twinkling of an eye…

 

Can she sew and can she spin…

She can sew and she can spin, she can do most anything…

 

Can she make a feather bed…

She can make a feather bed with the feet up at the head…

 

How old is she, Billy Boy, Billy Boy?

How old is she, charming Billy?

Three times six and four times seven,

Twenty-eight and eleven,

She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother.


 

 

Blow away the morning dew 🔊

 

 


From "English Folk-Songs for Schools," collected and edited by S. Baring Gould and Cecil J. Sharp, published by J. Curwen & Sons, London. I found it in ‘The Oxford Nursery Song book’ with only three verses more suited to younger children. You can find further verses at  https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=64609 though here ‘collected’ is disputed as the words are considered bland compared with the more racy Child 112 version! Not surprising in a school collection!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Upon the sweetest summer time,

In the middle of the morn,

A pretty damsel I espied,

The fairest ever born.

 

Chorus:

And sing, blow away the morning dew,

The dew, and the dew.

Blow away the morning dew,

How sweet the winds do blow.

 

She gathered to her lovely flowers,

And spent her time in sport;

As if in pretty Cupid's bowers,

She daily did resort.

 

The yellow cowslip by the brim,

The daffodil as well,

The timid primrose, pale and trim,

The pretty snowdrop bell.

 

She's gone with all those flowers sweet,

Of white, of red, of blue,

And unto me about my feet

Is only left the rue.


 

 

 

Boatman dance, boatman sing 🔊

 

 


This stevedore river song was written in the early 1800s by Daniel Decatur Emmett and in the folk tradition it has spawned many versions including banjo and other instrumentals such as a lovely one by Elizabeth Cotten. I was probably most influenced by Stephen Griffith who’s great folk collection can be found at: http://www.stephengriffith.com/folksongindex/boatman-dance/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Boatman dance, boatman sing,

Boatman do most any old thing.

Boatman sing, boatman play,

Boatman dance your life away.

 

Dance boatman dance,

Dance boatman dance.

Dance all night ‘til the broad daylight,

Go home with the gals in the morning.

Hey-ho, the boatman row,

Up and down the river on the Ohio.

Hey- ho, the boatman row,

Up and down the river on the Ohio.

 

Now when that boatman blows his horn,

Look out farmer, your rooster's gone.

He stole my sheep and he stole my goat,

Put 'em in a bag and went to the boat.

 

Four and twenty boatman in a flock,

Sitting by the seaside picking on a rock.

Picking on a rock, picking on a fiddle,

Picking at a catfish, bones in the middle.

 

Waterways, rivers, canals and streams,

We gotta work to make them clean.

We work all day out on the bay,

Then we dance the night away.


 

 

 

Bobby Shaftoe  O

 

A song with a delightfully jolly and bouncy tune, Bobby Shaftoe was a handsome fellow who broke the heart of a lady. He was also a parliamentarian from County Durham.

Find out more at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Shafto's_Gone_to_Sea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bobby Shaftoe's gone to sea,

Silver buckles on his knee;

He'll come back and marry me,

Bonny Bobby Shaftoe!

 

Bobby Shaftoe's bright and fair,

Combing down his yellow hair;

He’s my ain for evermair,

Bonny Bobby Shaftoe!

 

Bobby Shafto's getten a bairn,

For to dangle on his arm;

In his arm and on his knee,

Bobby Shafto loves me.[

 

Bobby Shaftoe's been to sea,

Silver buckles on his knee;

He's come back to marry me,

Bonny Bobby Shaftoe!

 


 

 

Bought me a cat O

 

A classic American children’s folk song.

Use puppets to help children remember the order of each farm animal. For even more fun allocate animal masks, they can make their own, to a group of children who stand up from squatting each time their animal is named.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bought me a cat, the cat pleased me,

Fed my cat under yonder tree.

Cat went fiddle-i-fee, fiddle-i-fee.

 

Bought me a hen, the hen pleased me,

Fed my hen under yonder tree.

Hen went chipsy-chopsy,

Cat went fiddle-i-fee, fiddle-i-fee.

 

Bought me a duck, the duck pleased me,

Fed my duck under yonder tree.

Duck went slishy, sloshy,

Hen went chipsy-chopsy,

Cat went fiddle-i-fee, fiddle-i-fee.

 

Bought me a goose, the goose pleased me,

Fed my goose under yonder tree.

Goose went quaa,

Duck went slishy, sloshy,

Hen went chipsy-chopsy,

Cat went fiddle-i-fee, fiddle-i-fee.

 

Bought me a sheep... Sheep went baa...

Bought me a cow... Cow went moo...

Bought me a horse ... Horse went neigh...

Bought me a baby... Baby went whaa..

Bought me a wife... Wife went honey, honey ...

 

 


 

 

Brush, brush, brush 🔊

 

 


From BBCTV’s Playschool, written by Peter Gosling. Listen to the original here:

 

Pretend to have a toothbrush and clean your teeth in time to the music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Up and down with your…

Brush, brush, brush

You mustn’t rush, rush, rush,

When you clean your teeth in the morning.

 

Use plenty of paste, paste, paste

For the peppermint taste, taste, taste,

When you clean your teeth in the morning.

 

You can munch, munch, munch

On your lunch, lunch, lunch,

You can crunch, crunch, crunch all day long,

You can bite, bite, bite with all your might, might, might,

It’s all right, right, right our teeth are strong.

 

Up and down with your…

Brush, brush, brush

You mustn’t rush, rush, rush,

When you clean your teeth in the morning,

And last thing at night,

In the morning, and last thing at night,

In the morning, and last thing at night, alright!


 

 

By the light of the silvery moon 🔊

 

 


Words by Ed Madden and music by Gus Edwards. It was first published in 1909.

The version below is a shortened one, very similar to the one our family listened to on the radio when I was young in the 1950s, sung by Burl Ives. Find out more at:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/By_the_Light_of_the_Silvery_Moon_(song)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


By the light of the silvery moon, I want to spoon,

To my honey I'll croon love's tune.

Honeymoon keep a shining in June;

Your silv’ry beams will bring love dreams, we'll be cuddling soon,

By the silvery moon.

 

By the light, of the silvery moon, I want to spoon,

To my honey I'll croon love's tune.

Honeymoon, sweet honeymoon, keep a shining in June, keep a shining in June,

Your silv’ry beams will bring love dreams, we'll be cuddling soon,

By the silvery moon.

The sil’vry moon.

 


 

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