Song cupboard A-B

A basket full of nuts

A cat came a-fiddling out of a barn

A dog and a mouse / Animals’ dance

A frog he would a-wooing go

A frog went walking on a summer’s day

A hundred years ago

A little bird sat on a tree

A nonsense song

A place in the choir

A sly old fox am I

Among the little white daisies

Away into space

Bananas in pyjamas

Be happy, be happy today!

Big Rock Candy Mountain

Bill Grogan’s goat

Billy Boy

Blow away the morning dew

Boatman dance, boatman sing

Bobby Shaftoe

Bought me a cat

Last updated: 5/22/2018 3:33 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we go’ Round and about

compiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

Return to the Singing games for children’ home

To listen to music from these songs click on O

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

·       you may not use this work for commercial purposes

·       for any re-use or distribution, you must make clear to others the licence terms of this work

·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.

 

 

 

A basketful of nuts O

 

 


A song from the Dutch tradition. The English words are by R. Elkin and the song comes from Mabel F. Wilson’s ‘Music time’ an infant teacher’s classic in the 1960s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A basket full of nuts I’ve gathered from my auntie’s tree,

And now I’m going home and I am taking them all with me.

Fa la la, fa la la, fa la la la la la la,

Fa la la, fa la la, fa la la la la la la,

A basket full of nuts I’ve gathered from my auntie’s tree.

 


 

 

A cat came a-fiddling out of a barn O

 

 


This is more traditionally known as: ‘A cat came fiddling out of a barn’.

I came across it in The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes (edited by Iona and Peter Opie) where it was noted that the earliest form of this rhyme appeared in a Wiltshire manuscript and in Nursery Songs and London Jingles both dated around 1740.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A cat came a-fiddling out of a barn,

With a pair of bagpipes under her arm.

She could play nothing but fiddle-cum-fee,

The mouse has married the bumble bee.

Pipe, cat; dance, mouse;

We'll have a wedding at our good house,

Pipe, cat; dance, mouse;

We'll have a wedding at our good house,

 

A pig came a-dancing out of the barn,

With a pair of drums tucked under his arm.

He could play nothing but diddle-dum-dee,

The mouse has married the bumble bee.

Pipe, cat; dance, mouse;

We'll have a wedding at our good house…

 

A cow came dancing out of the barn,

With a big brass horn under her arm.

She could play nothing but tootle-tum-tee,

The mouse has married the bumble bee.

Pipe, cat; dance, mouse;

We'll have a wedding at our good house…

 


 

 

A dog and a mouse 🔊

 

 


A cumulative song.

Welcome to our house for fun and dancing – the more the merrier!

I presume this came from a BBC Schools TV or radio programme. As a young teacher I would cut out favourite songs from old brochures and add them to my class collection; unfortunately at that time I did not appreciate the need for recording the source and author.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A dog and a mouse lived together in a house

And spent their time in dancing,

And all day long they would sing a little song

To keep their feet a-prancing.

 

Tweak! Tweak! Tweak! Sang the mouse with a squeak,

Jig, jig, jog went the little dog.

All together with a one and two and three,

Until their bedtime came.

 

There came a horse who said ‘Of course

I seldom go out dancing,

But I have come to join in the fun

So may I now start prancing?’

Hee! Hee! Hee! Said the great big horse…

 

Then up to the door with a rumble and a roar,

Came a great big bull advancing

With eyes bright red, but all he said

Was ‘May I join the dancing?’

Rerr! Rerr! Rerr! Said the bull with a snort…

 

And then came a cow and a big fat sow

And little lambs a-dancing;

We haven’t got a home we can call our very own,

But yours we think entrancing.

Moo! Moo! Moo! Said the friendly cow…

 


 

 

 

A frog he would a-wooing go O

 

 


This is a very familiar song to those of our generation. This is a very old song, I have seen it in 140 Folk songs 1915 It has been suggested that its purpose was to satirize the rural gentry of Suffolk: Rowley, Poley, Bacon and Green were four families of Suffolk notables.(Wikisource)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A frog he would a-wooing go,

“Heigh ho!” says Rowley;

A frog he would a-wooing go,

Whether his mother would let him or no.

With a rowly, powly, gammon, and spinach,

“Heigh ho!” says Anthony Rowley.

 

So off he set with his opera hat,

“Heigh ho!” says Rowley;

So off he set with his opera hat,

And on the road he met with a rat,

With a rowly, powly, gammon, and spinach,

“Heigh ho!” says Anthony Rowley.

 

They rode till they came to Mousey's Hall,

“Heigh ho!” says Rowley;

They rode till they came to Mousey's Hall,

They gave a loud knock, and they gave a loud call.

With a rowly, powly, gammon, and spinach,

“Heigh ho!” says Anthony Rowley.

 

Pray, Mrs. Mouse, are you within?

“Heigh ho!” says Rowley;

Yes, kind sirs, I'm sitting to spin.

With a rowly, powly, gammon, and spinach,

“Heigh ho!” says Anthony Rowley.

 

Pray, Mr. Frog will you give us a song?

“Heigh ho!” says Rowley;

But let it be something that's not very long.

With a rowly, powly, gammon, and spinach,

“Heigh ho!” says Anthony Rowley.

 

She had not been sitting long to spin,

“Heigh ho!” says Rowley;

When the cat and the kittens came tumbling in.

With a rowly, powly, gammon, and spinach,

“Heigh ho!” says Anthony Rowley.

 

The cat she seized the Rat by the crown,

“Heigh ho!” says Rowley;

The kittens they pulled the little mouse down.

With a rowly, powly, gammon, and spinach,

“Heigh ho!” says Anthony Rowley.

 

This put Mr. Frog in a terrible fright;

“Heigh ho!” says Rowley;

He took up his hat and he wished them “Goodnight.”

With a rowly, powly, gammon, and spinach,

“Heigh ho!” says Anthony Rowley.

 

But as Froggy was crossing a silvery brook,

“Heigh ho!” says Rowley;

A lily white duck came and gobbled him up.

With a rowly, powly, gammon, and spinach,

“Heigh ho!” says Anthony Rowley.

 

So there’s an end of one, two, three,

“Heigh ho!” says Rowley;

The Rat, the Mouse, and the little Frog-gee.

With a rowly, powly, gammon, and spinach,

“Heigh ho!” says Anthony Rowley.

 


 

 

 

A frog went walking on a summer’s day O

 

 


This is more traditionally known as: “Frog went a-courtin’’. This version is adapted from Barbara Ireson and Christopher Rowe’s ‘Over and over again’ published in 1978. A slightly different song was recorded by the Wiggles in Australia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A frog went walking on a summer’s day,

A hum, a hum.

A frog went walking on a summer’s day,

He met Miss Mousie on the way,

A hum, a hum, a hum, a hum, a hum.

 

He said, “Miss Mousie will you marry me?”

A hum, a hum,

He said, “Miss Mousie will you marry me?

We’ll live together in an apple tree.”

A hum, a hum, a hum, a hum, a hum.

 

The first to the wedding was Mr. Pig,

A hum, a hum,

The first to the wedding was Mr. Pig,

He played the guitar and danced a jig,

A hum, a hum, a hum, a hum, a hum.

 

And what do you think they had for supper?

A hum, a hum,

And what do you think they had for supper?

A fried mosquito and bread and butter.

Yum yum, yum yum, yum yum, yum yum, yum yum.

 

And what do you think they had on the shelf?

A hum, a hum,

And what do you think they had on the shelf?

If you want to know go look for yourself.

A hum, a hum, a hum, a hum, a hum.

 


 

 

A hundred years ago O

 

 


A sea shanty to be believed – do try! A hundred years is a very long time – so true if you are young; if you are old it is no time at all!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A hundred years is a very long time,

Oh, yes, oh,

A hundred years is a very long time,

A hundred years ago.

 

They used to think that pigs could fly,

Oh, yes, oh,

I don't believe it no, not I,

A hundred years ago.

 

They thought the moon was made of cheese,

Oh, yes, oh,

You can believe it, if you please,

A hundred years ago.

 

They thought the stars was set alight,

Oh, yes, oh,

By some good angel every night,

A hundred years ago.

 

A hundred years is a very long time,

Oh, yes, oh,

A hundred years is a very long time,

A hundred years ago.

 

I thought I heard the old man say,

Oh, yes, oh,

That we were homeward bound today,

It's time for us to go!

 


 

 

A little bird sat on a tree O

 

 


A German song translated into English by Mabel F. Wilson from ‘Music time’ a infant teacher’s classic music book in the 1960s.

Find it translated into Catalan at: http://malandia.cat/2016/01/a-little-bird/ 

 

1, Open and close thumb and forefinger.

2. Move fore finger like a worm. Make hands fly.

3. Brush cheeks for cat’s whiskers.

4. Hold up hands in crouching position. Count with fingers to three.

5. Clap hands.

6. Make hands fly, hold hands to chest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A little bird sat on a tree, on a tree, on a tree,

A little bird sat on a tree:

Still was he.

 

He saw his breakfast on the grass, on the grass, on the grass

He saw his breakfast on the grass:

Down flew he!

 

A pussy cat was hiding there, hiding there, hiding there,

A pussy cat was hiding there

Near the tree.

 

He set himself to make a spring, make a spring, make a spring,

He set himself to make a spring:

One! Two! Three!

 

But we began to clap our hands, clap our hands, clap our hands,

But we began to clap our hands

Noisily!

 

So then our little bird flew off, bird flew off, bird flew off,

So then our little bird flew off:

Glad were we.


 

 

 

A nonsense song O

 

 


For those that are fond of cheese.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was an old man who was awfully spry,

Diddle-um, diddle-um day!

He jumped off the ground halfway up to the sky,

Diddle-um, diddle-um day!

And what d’you think the old man saw,

Halfway up to the sky?

The man in the moon eating up his green cheese,

Diddle-um, diddle-um day!

 

The old man he says to the man in the moon,

Diddle-um, diddle-um day!

D’you think there’s a chance of you coming down soon?

Diddle-um, diddle-um day!

For as I’m very fond of cheese, bring with you I pray,

A very large piece for my tea if you please,

Diddle-um, diddle-um day!


 

 

A place in the choir 🔊

 

 


A wonderful song by Bill Staines, born 1947, an American folk musician from Massachusetts who has written and performed many other notable songs including those for children.

You can find versions by Irish musicians with badgers, otter and blackbirds and other European creatures joining the choir. It is also a popular song sung by young community groups and in school assemblies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


All God’s critters got a place in the choir,

Some sing low and some sing higher;

Some sing out loud on the telephone wire,

Some just clap their hands, or paws,

Or anything they got now.

 

Listen to the bass, it's the one on the bottom,

Where the bullfrog croaks and the hippopotamus

Moans and groans with a big t'do

And the old cow just goes ‘Moo!’.

 

The dogs and the cats they take up the middle

The honeybee hums and the cricket fiddles,

The donkey brays and the pony neighs

And the old coyote howls.

Chorus

 

Listen to the top where the little birds sing,

The melody with the high note ringing

The hoot owl hollers over everything

And the jaybird disagrees.

 

Singing in the night time, singing in the day,

The little duck quacks and is on his way.

The possum hasn’t got much to say

And the porcupine talks to himself.

Chorus

 

It's a simple song, you can sing it everywhere

With the ox and the fox and the grizzly bear,

The grumpy alligator, the the hawk above,

The sly raccoon and the turtle dove.

 

Everybody here is a part of the plan;

We all get to play in the great critter band,

From the eagle in the sky to the whale in the sea,

It’s one great symphony.

Chorus

 


 

 

 

A sly old fox am I O

 

 


A traditional song published in ‘Infant Joy’ edited by Desmond Mahon and published in 1954 by University of London Press; it was one of the standard song books in the infant classroom when I first began my teaching career in the 1960s. The book unfortunately does not acknowledge source materials.

Sing stealthily.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A sly old fox am I,

And in a farm nearby,

I hear the geese say, “Clack, clack, clack!”

The ducks say, “Quack, quack, quack!”

A sly old fox am I.

 

All night when they’re asleep

Into the yard I creep;

A goose upon my back I throw

Then quickly home I go;

A sly old fox am I.

 

The farmer he has come

To shoot me with his gun

But though he searches everywhere,

He cannot find my lair;

A sly old fox am I.


 

 

Among the little white daisies  🔊

 

 


An adaptation of a folk song from Alabama.

A good introduction song and way of including new children into a group. Can also be used as a birthday song. Children’s self confidence can be built by using their name.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Peter is his first name, first name, first name,

Peter is his first name, among the little white daisies.

Johnson is his second name, second name, second name,

Johnson is his second name, among the little white daisies.

 

This is Emilia’s birthday, birthday, birthday,

This is Emilia’s birthday, she’s six years old today.


 

 

Away into space 🔊

 

 


This song comes from Cynthia Raza’s book ‘The lollipop man’ published in 1975.

An opportunity to mime space actions including moon walks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chorus:Away, away, away to the stars,

Maybe to Venus, maybe to Mars.

Away, away, away from our base

Into space.

 

All systems ready

At Mission Control,

We blast off at midnight

And head for our goal

Into space.

 

We land on the moon

And do a moon walk,

They see us on Earth,

And they even hear us talk

In space.

 

Our space-suits are special

As the atmosphere is rare,

Our boots must be weighted

Or we’d float in the air

In space.


 

 

 

Bananas in pyjamas O

 

 


Words and music by Carey Blyton (nephew of Enid Blyton) in 1967.This crazy song became a regular favourite on Australia’s Playschool. Find out more at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bananas_in_Pyjamas, http://www.careyblyton.com/??=Bananas

 

For more fun add other fruit and veggie verses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bananas, in pyjamas,

Are coming down the stairs;

Bananas, in pyjamas,

Are coming down in pairs;

Bananas, in pyjamas,

Are chasing teddy bears -

'Cos on Tuesdays

They all try to

CATCH them unawares!

 

Zucchinis in bikinis… are sliding…

Green beans in blue jeans… are running…

Potatoes in their jackets... are hopping….

 


 

 

Be happy, be happy today! 🔊

 

 


A song written in 1935 and published in ‘The nursery song and picture book published in 1947. Words and music by Miriam Drury. The seasonal lines below were written by Dany Rosevear. Some might prefer the simple original verse:

I saw a bird in the top of a tree,

This is the song he was singing to me,

“God loves us all in a wonderful way,

Be happy, be happy today.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I saw a bird in the top of a tree,

This is the song it was singing to me,

“The world is awake and the sun’s out to play:

Be happy, be happy today,

Be happy, be happy today!”

 

I saw a bird in the top of a tree,

This is the song it was singing to me,

“Lovely Autumn has come, watch the leaves fly away:

Be happy, be happy today…

 

I saw a bird in the top of a tree,

This is the song it was singing to me,

“The snow fell all night, soft and white as it lay,

Be happy, be happy today…

 

I saw a bird in the top of a tree,

This is the song it was singing to me,

“Now Springtime has come, all the flowers smile and say:

Be happy, be happy today…


 

 

Bill Grogan’s goat 🔊

 

 


A comic echo song.

It was a popular Burl Ives song and possibly originated from Ireland as ‘O’Grady’s goat’ https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=53457 .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


There was a man There was a man

Now please take note Now please take note

There was a man There was a man

Who had a goat. Who had a goat.

He loved that goat He loved that goat

Indeed he did Indeed he did

He loved that goat He loved that goat

Just like a kid. Just like a kid.

 

One day that goat One day that goat

Felt frisk and fine Felt frisk and fine

Ate three red shirts Ate three red shirts

Right off the line. Right off the line.

The man, he grabbed The man, he grabbed

Him by the back Him by the back

And tied him to And tied him to

A railroad track. A railroad track

 

Now, when that train Now, when that train

Hove into sight Hove into sight

That goat grew pale That goat grew pale

And green with fright. And green with fright.

He heaved a sigh He heaved a sigh

As if in pain As if in pain

Coughed up those shirts Coughed up those shirts

And flagged the train! And flagged the train!


 

 

Big Rock Candy Mountain O

 

 


This song was written by the hobo singer Henry ‘Mac’ McClintock to warn off young folk seduced by the supposed nirvana of the wandering life.

 

The version below has a lighter tone describing a land of milk and honey to feed younger more innocent imaginations before they need get to grips with the difficult life of a hobo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


In the Big Rock Candy Mountain,

There's a land that's fair and bright,

Where the handouts grow on bushes,

And you sleep out ev'ry night,

Where the boxcars are all empty,

And the sun shines ev'ry day,

Oh I’m bound to go, where there ain't no snow,

Where the rain don't fall and the winds don't blow,

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain.

 

Oh, the buzzin’ of the bees in the peppermint trees,

‘Round the soda water fountain,

Near the lemonade springs where the bluebird sings,

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain.

 

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain,

All the frogs have wooden legs,

The bulldogs all have rubber teeth,

And the hens lay soft-boiled eggs.

The farmer's trees are full of fruit,

And the barns are full of hay.

Oh I’m bound to go, where there ain't no snow,

Where the rain don't fall and the winds don't blow,

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain.

 

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain,

You never change your socks,

And little streams of lemonade,

Come a-tricklin' down the rocks.

The hobos there are friendly,

And their fires all burn bright,

There's a lake of stew and ginger ale too,

You can paddle all around it in a big canoe,

In the Big Rock Candy Mountain.


 

 

Billy Boy O

 

I have had fun trying to recall this song I sang at a Norfolk school in the 1950s not so successfully. This is more or less as I remember it and put together with a little help from the internet!

It has a Roud number 326.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Where have you been all the day, Billy Boy, Billy Boy?

Where have you been all the day, charming Billy?

I have been to seek a wife, she’s the idol of my life,

She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother.

 

Did she ask you to come in, Billy Boy, Billy Boy? Did she ask you to come in, charming Billy?

Yes, she asked me to come in, there's a dimple on her chin.

She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother.

 

Can she make a cherry pie…

She can make a cherry pie in the twinkling of an eye…

 

Can she sew and can she spin…

She can sew and she can spin, she can do most anything…

 

Can she make a feather bed…

She can make a feather bed with the feet up at the head…

 

How old is she, Billy Boy, Billy Boy?

How old is she, charming Billy?

Three times six and four times seven,

Twenty-eight and eleven,

She's a young thing and cannot leave her mother.


 

 

Blow away the morning dew 🔊

 

 


From "English Folk-Songs for Schools," collected and edited by S. Baring Gould and Cecil J. Sharp, published by J. Curwen & Sons, London. I found it in ‘The Oxford Nursery Song book’ with only three verses more suited to younger children. You can find further verses at  https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=64609 though here ‘collected’ is disputed as the words are considered bland compared with the more racy Child 112 version! Not surprising in a school collection!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Upon the sweetest summer time,

In the middle of the morn,

A pretty damsel I espied,

The fairest ever born.

 

Chorus:

And sing, blow away the morning dew,

The dew, and the dew.

Blow away the morning dew,

How sweet the winds do blow.

 

She gathered to her lovely flowers,

And spent her time in sport;

As if in pretty Cupid's bowers,

She daily did resort.

 

The yellow cowslip by the brim,

The daffodil as well,

The timid primrose, pale and trim,

The pretty snowdrop bell.

 

She's gone with all those flowers sweet,

Of white, of red, of blue,

And unto me about my feet

Is only left the rue.


 

 

 

Boatman dance, boatman sing 🔊

 

 


This stevedore river song was written in the early 1800s by Daniel Decatur Emmett and in the folk tradition it has spawned many versions including banjo and other instrumentals such as a lovely one by Elizabeth Cotten. I was probably most influenced by Stephen Griffith who’s great folk collection can be found at: http://www.stephengriffith.com/folksongindex/boatman-dance/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Boatman dance, boatman sing,

Boatman do most any old thing.

Boatman sing, boatman play,

Boatman dance your life away.

 

Dance boatman dance,

Dance boatman dance.

Dance all night ‘til the broad daylight,

Go home with the gals in the morning.

Hey-ho, the boatman row,

Up and down the river on the Ohio.

Hey- ho, the boatman row,

Up and down the river on the Ohio.

 

Now when that boatman blows his horn,

Look out farmer, your rooster's gone.

He stole my sheep and he stole my goat,

Put 'em in a bag and went to the boat.

 

Four and twenty boatman in a flock,

Sitting by the seaside picking on a rock.

Picking on a rock, picking on a fiddle,

Picking at a catfish, bones in the middle.

 

Waterways, rivers, canals and streams,

We gotta work to make them clean.

We work all day out on the bay,

Then we dance the night away.


 

 

 

Bobby Shaftoe  O

 

A song with a delightfully jolly and bouncy tune, Bobby Shaftoe was a handsome fellow who broke the heart of a lady. He was also a parliamentarian from County Durham.

Find out more at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Shafto's_Gone_to_Sea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bobby Shaftoe's gone to sea,

Silver buckles on his knee;

He'll come back and marry me,

Bonny Bobby Shaftoe!

 

Bobby Shaftoe's bright and fair,

Combing down his yellow hair;

He’s my ain for evermair,

Bonny Bobby Shaftoe!

 

Bobby Shafto's getten a bairn,

For to dangle on his arm;

In his arm and on his knee,

Bobby Shafto loves me.[

 

Bobby Shaftoe's been to sea,

Silver buckles on his knee;

He's come back to marry me,

Bonny Bobby Shaftoe!

 


 

 

Bought me a cat O

 

A classic American children’s folk song.

Use puppets to help children remember the order of each farm animal. For even more fun allocate animal masks, they can make their own, to a group of children who stand up from squatting each time their animal is named.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bought me a cat, the cat pleased me,

Fed my cat under yonder tree.

Cat went fiddle-i-fee, fiddle-i-fee.

 

Bought me a hen, the hen pleased me,

Fed my hen under yonder tree.

Hen went chipsy-chopsy,

Cat went fiddle-i-fee, fiddle-i-fee.

 

Bought me a duck, the duck pleased me,

Fed my duck under yonder tree.

Duck went slishy, sloshy,

Hen went chipsy-chopsy,

Cat went fiddle-i-fee, fiddle-i-fee.

 

Bought me a goose, the goose pleased me,

Fed my goose under yonder tree.

Goose went quaa,

Duck went slishy, sloshy,

Hen went chipsy-chopsy,

Cat went fiddle-i-fee, fiddle-i-fee.

 

Bought me a sheep... Sheep went baa...

Bought me a cow... Cow went moo...

Bought me a horse ... Horse went neigh...

Bought me a baby... Baby went whaa..

Bought me a wife... Wife went honey, honey ...

 

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