Number songs counting to 100

 

Counting apple seeds

Lean daddy longlegs

One two buckle my shoe

The appleman

The centipede song

We’ll all go down the meadow

 

Also find songs at:

Ants in their pants

Can you count?

Floating down the river

Four in a boat

Here comes the little centipede

Last updated: 8/28/2018 4:41 PM

The songs below are compiled, illustrated and sometimes adapted by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on O

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

Counting apple seeds  🔊

 

 


A child’s divination and counting rhyme, traditionally English but with the addition of the last three lines it was known in New England at the beginning the 19th century, Newell, 1883. Information can be found in the Opie’s ‘Oxford dictionary of nursery rhymes’ p391.

Reminds me of counting plum stones after a plum and custard dessert: ‘Tinker, tailor, soldier, sailor’ and also daisy petal counting ‘He loves me, he loves me not’. These rhymes were also used for skipping’

Tune by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One I love, two I love,

Three I love, I say,

Four I love with all my heart,

And five, I cast away;

Six he loves, seven she loves,

Eight they both love;

Nine he comes, ten he tarries,

Eleven he courts, twelve he marries;

Thirteen wishes, fourteen kisses,

All the rest little witches.

 


 

 

Lean daddy longlegs 🔊

 

 


There are so many tiny creatures to be found under a stone, lift but do not disturb.

The words are in Candy Verney’s delightful book ‘The Singing Year’ where it was attributed to ‘Anon’ but I have been unable to find the words anywhere else.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lean daddy longlegs underneath a stone,

Have you any company, or are you all alone?

Peep, peep under, peep and you will see,

Two spotted ladybirds are sitting here with me.

 

Lean daddy longlegs underneath a stone,

Have you any company, or are you all alone?

Peep, peep under, peep and you will see,

Three beetles, inky black are sitting here with me.

 

Six skinny earwigs are sitting here with me.

 

Four and twenty spiders are sitting here with me.

 

Lean daddy longlegs, pray what will you say

If children going home from school roll that stone away?

If children going home from school roll that stone away,

Then all my little guests and I must say, “Good day!”

 


 

 

 

One two buckle my shoe

 

This number rhyme lends itself to miming. It has a Roud Folk Song index number of 11284. To find out more visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One,_Two,_Buckle_My_Shoe

The site http://www.rhymes.org.uk/one_two_buckle_my_shoe.htm links its origins to the lacemaking industry.

 

One, two, buckle my shoe;

Three, four,

Knock at the door;

Five, six, pick up sticks;

Seven, eight, lay them straight:

Nine, ten, a big, fat hen;

Eleven, twelve, dig and delve;

Thirteen, fourteen, maids a-courting;

Fifteen, sixteen, maids in the kitchen;

Seventeen, eighteen, maids a-waiting

Nineteen, twenty, my plate's empty!

 


 

 

The appleman  🔊

 

 


An addition song and days of the week. The numbers can vary according to the concept being taught e.g. two or five apples each day.

Words by Helen Clyde, tune by Dany Rosevear; You can find the original tune in A&C Black’s ‘Count me in’ published 1984.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Well, well, well,

Which of you can tell?

How many apples did the old man sell?

One on Monday,

Two on Tuesday,

Three on Wednesday,

Four on Thursday,

Five on Friday,

Six on Saturday,

Well, well, well,

Now can you tell?

How many apples did the old man sell?

 

 


 

 

The centipede song O

 

There are two versions of this to be found on iTunes. It possibly was also on an Early Learning Centre CD in the past.

I have as yet been unable to find the name of the composer. It was brought to my attention by a teacher from the Middle East who wondered if I was familiar with the song. I had not come across it before but was intrigued enough to do some research and to have a go at recording it informally.

Recently heard it might be written by Kaye Umansky???

 

Make a line with hands on shoulders and walk lifting legs up on one side and the other. The leader takes the others off on a wavy path. The leader joins the tail to allow for a new leader after each verse is sung. Have three or four centipedes on the go so everyone gets a turn to be leader.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A centipede will certainly need

A hundred stripy socks,

But what will he do when he wears them out

With climbing trees and rocks?

What will he do when his socks wear through,

When all of his socks wear out?

He’ll sit in a heap and start to weep,

As his mother begins to shout.

Here’s what his mother will shout,

Whenever his socks wear out.

 

Chorus:

“I’ve bought you ten, bought you twenty,

Bought you thirty, forty, fifty,

Bought you sixty, seventy, eighty, ninety,

Bought you a hundred socks!

So off to bed now sonny,

Do you think I’m made of money?

Until I can afford to buy you more,

You can keep your feet right off the floor!”

 

A centipede will certainly need

A hundred tiny boots.

But what will he do when his boots wear through,

From wriggling under roots?

What will he do when his boots wear through,

When all of his boots wear out?

He’ll sit in a heap and start to weep,

As his father begins to shout.

Here’s what his father will shout,

Whenever his boots wear out.

 

Chorus:

“I’ve bought you ten, bought you twenty,

Bought you thirty, forty, fifty,

Bought you sixty, seventy, eighty, ninety,

Bought you a hundred boots!

So off to bed now sonny,

Do you think I’m made of money?

Until I can afford to buy you more,

You can keep your feet right off the floor!”

 

 


 

 

 

We’ll all go down the meadow 🔊

 

 


Learn to count down in ones.

This is a community song from ‘The Ditty Bag’ compiled by Janet E. Tobitt in 1946. It was contributed by Gwladys Davies so could possibly be of Welsh origin.

The book suggests this song should be sung with very deliberate rhythm and with harmony on ‘We’ll have no more’ for an effective variation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Be one little, be two little,

We'll all go down the meadow,

Be three little, be four little,

We'll all go down the meadow,

Be four, be three, be two, be one,

We'll have no more.

Hay me hay, carry me hay,

We'll all go down the meadow.

 

Be five little, be six little,

We'll all go down the meadow,

Be seven little, be eight little,

We'll all go down the meadow,

Be eight, be seven, be six, be five,

Be four, be three, be two, be one,

We'll have no more.

Hay me hay, carry me hay,

We'll all go down the meadow.

 

Be nine little, be ten little…

 

Be thirteen little, be fourteen little…

 

Be seventeen little, be eighteen little…


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