Nursery number favourites to 5 F

Five little fingers

Five little fishes

Five little friends in a flying saucer

Five little gingerbread men in a row

Five little gingerbread men lying on a tray

Five little leprechauns

Five little men made out of snow

Five little monkeys bouncing on the bed

Five little monkeys swinging in a tree

Five little monkeys walked along the shore

Five little owls on a moonlit night

Five little robins on a sycamore tree

Five little seashells

Five little shamrocks

Five little snowmen fat

Five little speckled frogs

Five little turkeys

Five little worms on the garden lawn

Five old crows

Five pigs so squeaky clean

Five plump peas

Five snow angels

Five Spring flowers

Five snow angels

Four scarlet berries

Four seeds in a hole

Last updated: 13/11/2018 16:10

 

The songs below are compiled, illustrated and sometimes adapted

by Dany Rosevear

Return to the Singing games for children’ home

To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the

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Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.

 

 

Five little fingers  🔊

 

 


A classic hand play. For more challenge sing ‘Ten little fingers’.

 

1.  Hold up five fingers and wiggle them. 2. Dance fingers on lap or a surface. 3. Tap fingers on lap or a surface. 4. Shake fingers. 5. Cross fingers at wrist and make them fly. 6. Place fingers to cheek and close eyes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little fingers, my little fingers, fat little fingers, so!

La lala la la, la lala la la, la la la la la!

 

Dance little fingers my little fingers, fat little fingers, so!

La lala la la, la lala la la, la la la la la!

 

Tap little fingers, my little fingers, fat little fingers, so!

La lala la la, la lala la la, la la la la la!

 

Shake little fingers, my little fingers, fat little fingers, so!

La lala la la, la lala la la, la la la la la!

 

Fly little fingers, my little fingers, fat little fingers, so!

La lala la la, la lala la la, la la la la la!

 

Sleep little fingers, my little fingers, fat little fingers, so!

La lala la la, la lala la la, la la la la la!

 


 

 

 

Five little fishes  🔊

 

 


Watch out little fish – here comes shark! A simple ‘one less’ number hand play.

 

1. Put up number of fingers. 2. Place one hand on top of the other hand with thumbs out and moving like fins. 3. Palms of hands open and shut. 4. Grab at fish. Continue with four and down to zero. Last line: Point fiercely at audience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little fishes,

Swimming in the sea,

Along came a great big Shark…

And ate one for his tea!

 

Four little fishes…

 

Three little fishes…

 

Two little fishes…

 

One little fish,

Swimming in the sea,

Along came a great big Shark…

And ate it for his tea!

 

No little fishes,

Swimming in the sea

Along came a great big Shark who said,

"Did you eat my tea?"


 

 

 

Five little friends in a flying saucerO

 

 


An updated version of ‘Five little men in a flying saucer’.

Count fingers down in this nursery favourite that encourages subtracting numbers from five. At the end of the song introduce the concept of nought.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little friends in a flying saucer,

Flew round the world one day,

They looked left and right, but they didn’t like the sight,

So one then flew away.

 

Four little friends in a flying saucer…

 

Three little friends in a flying saucer…

 

Two little friends in a flying saucer…

 

One  little friend in a flying saucer,

Flew round the world one day,

He felt all alone and just wanted to go home,

So he quickly flew away.

Hold up five fingers and put down one finger each time the song is sung. Ask the question ‘And one less is...?’

 

 

 


 

 

Five little gingerbread men in a row O

 

 


Put felt gingerbread men on a board and remove one at a time. Or even better make five gingerbread men biscuits and eat with friends.

 

Verse 1: Hold up five fingers, wave from side to side. Shake finger and head. Hand Make binoculars with hands to the eyes, touch head then toes. Slap thighs for ‘crunch’, clap hands for ‘munch’, then put hands to mouth on ‘uh oh!’

Verse 2: As before but on the third line make binoculars, then forefingers run down cheeks to represent tears. Last line: slap thighs, clap, then throw up hands and shrug shoulders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little gingerbread men in a row,

Not gonna eat one no, no, no!

But they look so sweet from head to toe

Crunch, munch...uh oh!

Continue until...

 

No little gingerbread men in a row;

Wasn't gonna eat one, no, no, no.

But they looked so sweet that it's sad to tell

Crunch, munch... oh well!


 

 

Five little gingerbread men lying on a tray  🔊

 

 


‘Catch me if you can!’ goes the refrain from the classic story, one that every child should hear. At the end of the song comes the conundrum: eat, play or sing!

 

Place fingers of one hand onto the open hand of the other hand. Make one finger run away. Put hands to mouth to shout, make finger run, look proud and point to self. Continue with four and down to zero.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little gingerbread men lying on a tray,

One jumped up and ran away.

Shouting, "Catch me, catch me, catch me if you can!

I run really fast, I’m the gingerbread man,

The gingerbread man, the gingerbread man,

I run really fast, I’m the gingerbread man!

 

Four little gingerbread men lying on a tray…

Three little gingerbread men lying on a tray…

Two little gingerbread men lying on a tray…

 

One little gingerbread man lying on a tray,

He jumped up and ran away….

 

No more gingerbread men lying on a tray,

They all jumped up and ran away.

Oh, how I wish they had stayed with me to play.

Next time I'll eat them before they run away!

 


 

 

Five little leprechauns  🔊

 

 


A subtraction rhyme

A leprechaun is a little bearded man from Irish folklore; dressed in a green coat he is reknowned for his mischeivous ways. Find out more at:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leprechaun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little leprechauns knocked at my door,

One chased a rainbow, then there were four,

 

Four little leprechauns, oh so wee,

One picked a shamrock, then there were three.

 

Three little leprechauns hiding in my shoe,

One found a toadstool, then there were two.

 

Two little leprechauns dancing in the sun,

One went in search of gold, then there was one.

 

One little leprechaun on the run,

He shined his shoe buckles and sat in the sun.

 


 

 

 

Five little men made out of snow O

 

 


This traditional song has several tunes but I love this one by Nancy Stewart.

 

This song can simply be played using the fingers and hands or with a group of children where one child drops down each time to become a puddle.

1. Hold up five fingers. 2. Pretend to put on hat and tie bow. 3. Make sun with a big movement and make it shine. 4. One finger wiggles downward. 5. Shrug shoulders and throw out palms of hands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little men made out of snow,

Each with a hat and a big red bow,

Out came the sun and it stayed all day,

One little snowman melted away!

SPOKEN And he said, “Oops, I’m a puddle!”

 

Four little men made out of snow…

And so on.

 

No little men made out of snow,

None with a hat and a big red bow,

Out came the sun and it winked my way,

Put on your wellies, it’s time for puddle play!

 


 

 

 

 

Five little friends in a flying saucer O

 

Count fingers down in this nursery favourite that encourages subtracting numbers from five. At the end of the song introduce the concept of nought.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little friends in a flying saucer,

Flew round the world one day,

They looked left and right but they didn’t like the sight,

So one then flew away.

 

Four little friends in a flying saucer…

 

Three little friends in a flying saucer…

 

Two little friends in a flying saucer…

 

One  little friend in a flying saucer,

Flew round the world one day,

He felt all alone and just wanted to go home,

So he quickly flew away.

 

Hold up five fingers and put down one finger each time a verse is sung.

Ask the question ‘And one less is...?’


 

 

Five little monkeys bouncing on the bed O

 

Another simple subtraction song using numbers to five. It can also be used with the numbers to ten counting back in twos. I have added a new final verse to include ‘ no little monkeys’

 

For a more vigorous workout have children jumping up and down in large hoops with one child jumping out of the hoop at the end of each verse and then all jumping back in on the last verse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little monkeys bouncing on the bed,

One fell off and bumped his head,

Mamma called the doctor and the doctor said.

‘No more monkey business bouncing on the bed!’

 

Four little monkeys …

 

Three little monkeys …

 

Two  little monkeys …

 

One little monkey…

 

No little monkeys bouncing on the bed,

For they’re down on the floor with tired little heads,

The clock struck seven and their mamma said,

‘Sleepy little monkeys it is time you were in bed!’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hold up five fingers for each monkey. Tap fingers on the palm of the other hand.

Hold head and look upset.

Pretend to phone doctor.

Shake forefinger angrily

Each time the song is sung lower one finger.

 

 


 

 

Five little monkeys swinging in a tree O

 

This song is usually chanted and the monkeys come to a sorry end; the one below has a happier outcome – perhaps!

Versions from the Americas usually have the monkeys teasing an alligator.

 

Hold up five fingers for each monkey. With fingers pointing downwards swing hands to and fro. Tickle the back of one hand. Shake finger from side to side. Make hands open and close moving forwards. Make a big ‘snip snap’. Put hand to mouth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little monkeys swinging in a tree,

Teasing Mister Crocodile: "You can’t catch me!"

Along comes Mister Crocodile as quiet as can be...

And it’s SNIP! SNAP! Oh dear me!

 

Four little monkeys swinging in a tree,

Teasing Mister Crocodile: "You can’t catch me!"

Along comes Mister Crocodile as quiet as can be...

And it’s SNIP! SNAP! Oh dear me!

 

Three little monkeys swinging in a tree,

Teasing Mister Crocodile: "You can’t catch me!"

Along comes Mister Crocodile as quiet as can be...

And it’s SNIP! SNAP! Oh dear me!

 

Two little monkeys swinging in a tree,

Teasing Mister Crocodile: "You can’t catch me!"

Along comes Mister Crocodile as quiet as can be...

And it’s SNIP! SNAP! Oh dear me!

 

One little monkeys swinging in a tree,

Teasing Mister Crocodile: "You can’t catch me!"

Along comes Mister Crocodile as quiet as can be...

And it’s SNIP! SNAP! Oh dear me!

 

No little monkeys swinging in a tree,

And old Mister Crocodile is happy as can be,

Off he goes for a quiet cup of tea...

Leaving five little monkeys chasing fishes out to sea!

 


 

 

Five little monkeys walked along the shore O

 

Count back from five using your fingers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little monkeys walked along the shore,

One went sailing, then there were four.

 

Four little monkeys played in a tree.

One of them tumbled down, then there were three.

 

Three little monkeys found a pot of glue,

One got stuck in it, then there were two,

 

Two little monkeys found a currant bun,

One ran away with it, then there was one.

 

One little monkey cried all afternoon,

They put him in a spaceship and sent him to the moon.

 


 

 

Five little owls on a moonlit night 🔊

 

 


Keep score and learn to subtract with this night time song.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

Put one finger down each time to show ‘one less’. You can also show the owls big round eyes by making thumb and forefinger into circles. Cross hands at wrists to make one owl fly away. Count fingers to keep score. Make beak with forefingers when calling Whoo! Whoo! Whoo! Flap elbows to have lots of fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little owls on a moonlit night,

Five little owls are quite a sight.

Five little owls, are you keeping score?

One flew away! And then there were four.

 

Four little owls as happy as can be,

One flew away then there were three.

Three little owls calling Whoo! Whoo! Whoo!

One flew away! And that left two.

 

Two little owls having lots of fun,

One flew away and that left one.

One little owl, we are almost done,

He flew away and that left none.


 

 

 

Five little robins in a sycamore tree O

 

 


This delightful finger play rhyme comes from Early Childhood Themes Through the Year’ by Debbie Thompson, Darlene Hardwick, Theresa Wright.

Dany Rosevear wrote the melody.

 

1. Hold up five fingers. 2. Hold up thumb then forefinger 3. Hold up the rest. 4. Point to thumb then forefinger. 5. Point to subsequent fingers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little robins in a sycamore tree,

A father, a mother,

And babies three;

Father brought a worm,

Mother brought a bug,

The three baby robins started to tug;

This one ate the bug,

This one ate the worm,

This one sat and waited for his turn.


 

 

Five little shamrocks 🔊

 

 


A song for St. Patrick’s Day. Add one more each time. Find as many shades of green and their names as possible.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

Raise a finger for each shamrock.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One green shamrock, in the morning dew,

Another one sprouted and then there were two.

 

Two green shamrocks growing beneath a tree,

Another one sprouted and then there were three.

 

Three green shamrocks by the cottage door,

Another one sprouted and then there were four.

 

Four green shamrocks near a beehive,

Another one sprouted and then there were five.

 

Five little shamrocks bright and emerald green,

Think of all the good luck those shamrocks will bring!


 

 

 

 

Five little speckled frogs O

 

A big springtime nursery favourite.

Get jumping around the room like little frogs for a more energetic activity than the hand actions below.

Make a big splashing sound with a tambourine when the frog jumps into the pool.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little speckled frogs

Sat on a speckled log,

Eating the most delicious bugs,

YUM! YUM!

One jumped into the pool – SPLASH!

Where it was nice and cool,

Then there were four green speckled frogs,

GLUB! GLUB!

 

Four little speckled frogs …

 

Three little speckled frogs …

 

Two  little speckled frogs …

 

One little speckled frog

Sat on a speckled log,

Eating the most delicious bugs,

YUM! YUM!

It jumped into the pool – SPLASH!

Where it was nice and cool,

Then there were no green speckled frogs,

BOO-HOO!

Hold up five fingers.

Rest fist on top of hand.

Flick tongues in and out.

Rub tummy.

Clap hands.

Wipe brow.

Raise four fingers.

Fists open and close to each ‘GLUB!’

 

Repeat as above for each new verse with the appropriate number of fingers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Five little turkeys O

 

 


A number song for Thanksgiving or Christmas. Some versions for those with more stamina start at ten and can easily found on line – or make up your own verses!

Melody by Dany Rosevear.

Subtract one each time from five.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little turkeys sat in their pen,

“Hide, turkeys, hide!” said the little red hen.

One little turkey hopped out of the door,

And when he was gone, there were four.

 

Four little turkeys sat in their pen,

“Hide, turkeys, hide!” said the little red hen.

One little turkey climbed up a tree,

And when he was gone, there were three.

 

Three little turkeys sat in their pen,

“Hide, turkeys, hide!” said the little red hen.

One little turkey flapped his wings and flew,

And when he was gone, there were two.

 

Two little turkeys sat in their pen,

“Hide, turkeys, hide!” said the little red hen.

One little turkey flew out in the sun.

And when he was gone, that left one.

 

One little turkey sat in his pen,

“Hide, turkey, hide!” said the little red hen.

The last little turkey said, “I’m off to have fun!”

And when he was gone, there were none!


 

 

 

Five little worms on the garden lawn O

 

 


The number of worms on the lawn go down but those in the magpie’s tum go up; subtraction and addition in each verse!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five little worms on the garden lawn,

Wriggling around at the crack of dawn.

Along came a magpie, Yum, yum, yum!

Now that little worm is in her tum.

Little worm, little worm,

One little worm in a magpie’s tum.

 

Four little worms on the garden lawn,

Wriggling around at the crack of dawn.

Along came a magpie, Yum, yum, yum!

Now that little worm is in her tum.

Now that little worm is in her tum

Little worms, little worms,

Two little worms in a magpie’s tum.

 

Three little worms on the garden lawn,

Wriggling around at the crack of dawn.

Along came a magpie, Yum, yum, yum!

Now that little worm is in her tum.

Little worms, little worms,

Three little worms in a magpie’s tum.

 

Two little worms on the garden lawn,

Wriggling around at the crack of dawn.

Along came a magpie, Yum, yum, yum!

Now that little worm is in her tum.

Little worms, little worms,

Four little worms in a magpie’s tum.

 

One little worm on the garden lawn,

Wriggling around at the crack of dawn.

Along came a magpie, Yum, yum, yum!

Now that little worm is in her tum.

Little worms, little worms,

Five little worms in a magpie's tum.


 

 

Five old crows 🔊

 

 


Learn the number pairs that make five.

Music by Dany Rosevear.

 

Raise five fingers, place the other hand, the wall, in front. Wiggle four fingers and then the thumb. down each time to show ‘one less’. Show forefinger then make thumb and forefinger open and close like a beak to ‘caw’ like the crow. Cross hands at wrist and make hands ‘fly’. Continue as before until the are no birds left.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five old crows were on a brick wall.

Four were tall and the other was small.

One old crow cried, "Caw, caw, caw!"

He went to visit his mother-in-law.

 

Four old crows were on a brick wall.

Three were tall and the other was small.

One old crow went to get some food.

He never came back to the other brood.

 

Three old crows were on a brick wall.

Two were tall and the other was small.

The small one grew and grew and grew.

He flew away and that left two.

 

Two old crows were on a brick wall.

Both were old and both of them tall.

One crow said, “I miss my son.”

He flew away and that left one.

 

One old crow was on a brick wall.

He flew away and there was the wall!

One brick wall was alone in the rain,

Wishing for the crows to come back again.


 

 

Five pigs so squeaky clean 🔊

 

 


A farmyard number song.

Subtract one each time from five and learn ordinal numbers.

Sing the song quietly and then loudly for IN THE MUD! Fold one finger down each time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five pigs so squeaky clean,

Cleanest pigs you’ve ever seen,

Wanted to go outside and play-

IN THE MUD!

One jumped into the mud,

Landed with a great big thud,

Then there were four clean squeaky pigs!

Oink! Oink!

 


 

 

Five plump peas

 

A classic early year’s finger rhyme.

Here it is in Chinese – I’m not sure which language though! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syIUEbp5Or0

 

Five plump peas in a peapod pressed,

Clench fingers of one hand and cover with the other.

One grew, two grew, and so did all the rest.

Raise fingers one at a time.

They grew, and they grew

Stretch arms apart.

And they never stopped,

They grew SO BIG that the peapod... POPPED!

Clap hands loudly.


 

 

Five snow angels O

 

 


We didn’t make snow angels when I was young, I’ve only recently discovered them with my grandchildren.

What happens to those snow angels and snowmen at the end of the day; this song will keep you guessing unless you know about the water cycle and changing weather patterns!

 

Make snow angels in the snow by lying down and moving arms up and down. You are likely to get wet so make sure you have your waterproofs on!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Five snow angels in my garden lay;

Sleeping so quietly ‘til the end of day.

One saw the dark’ning sky, it’s true,

Softly, gently, up and up it flew.

 

Four snow angels…

One heard a barn owl hoot, it’s true….

 

Three snow angels…

One saw the twinkling stars, it’s true….

 

Two snow angels…

One saw a comet zoom, it’s true….

 

One snow angel…

It saw the shy moon smile, it’s true….

 

The sun is up and we’d like to know,

Where, oh where, did our snow angels go?

Then five white clouds sailed silently by,

I’m sure, so sure, one cloud winked an eye!

I’m sure, so sure, one cloud winked an eye!


 

 

Four scarlet berries 🔊

 

 


A number poem and hand play for Autumn. Count / subtract / count back.

Words by Mary Vivian. Music by Dany Rosevear.

Fold down one finger each time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Four scarlet berries

Left upon the tree,

“Thanks,” cried the black bird,

“These will do for me.”

He ate numbers one and two,

Then ate number three,

When he’d eaten number four,

There was none to see!

 


 

 

 

Four seeds in a hole O

 

 


An old countryside saying. It is also heard as: ‘One for the rook, one for the crow’

 

Make fingers to show how many seeds and count out their use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Four seeds in a hole,

Four seeds in a hole,

One for the mouse,

One for the crow,

One to rot and one to grow!

 


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