Nursery number favourites to 3

Three blind mice

Three craws

Three crows

Three dinosaurs came out to play

Three little birds

Three little fish

Three little kittens

Three little owls

Three little pigs and a little pig more

Three young rats

Twinkle, twinkle, traffic lights

Two little eyes

Two little eyes that blink, blink, blink

Way up high in the apple tree

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears

 

Also see:

Three little angels

Three jellyfish

Last updated: 3/13/2019 4:25 PM

The songs below are compiled, illustrated and sometimes adapted by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

·       you must give the original author credit

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·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

Three blind mice O

 

This song can easily be sung as a rhyme.

Find an energetic game to play at:

http://www.teachingideas.co.uk/pe/threeblindmice.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Three craws sat upon a wa’ 🔊

 

 


A number song from Scotland in the Scottish vernacular. Some time ago I videoed the English version that I sang regularly in the classroom from the classic children’s songbook ‘Sing a song one’ published by Inner London Education Authorities in 1978.

However many visitors to my channel from Scotland felt I was doing their dearly loved song a disservice – would I sing ‘Frere Jaques’ in English? So I have now remedied that and brought in a Glaswegian friend as a consultant!

Vocabulary: Craws – crows, wa' – wall, cauld – cold, greetin’ – crying, maw – mother, flee – fly, wisnae – wasn’t.

 

Hold up three fingers. Mime the other movements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three craws sat upon a wa',

Sat upon a wa', sat upon a wa'- a’-a’- a’

Three craws sat upon a wa',

On a cauld and frosty mornin'.

 

The first craw was greetin' for his maw,

Greetin' for his maw, greetin' for his maw, - a’-a’- a’

The first craw was greetin' for his maw,

On a cauld and frosty mornin'.

 

The second craw fell and broke his jaw,

Fell and broke his jaw, fell and broke his jaw, - a’-a’- a’

The second craw fell and broke his jaw,

On a cauld and frosty mornin'.

 

The third craw, couldnae flee at a',

Couldnae flee at a', couldnae flee at a', - a’-a’- a’

The third craw, couldnae flee at a',

On a cauld and frosty mornin'.

 

The fourth craw wisnae there at a’,

Wisnae there at a’, wisnae there at a’.- a’-a’- a’

The fourth craw wisnae there at a’

On a cauld and frosty mornin'.

 

That's a’ I know about the craws,

Know about the craws, know about the craws-a’-a’-a’s.

That's a’ I know about the craws,

On a cauld and frosty mornin’.

 


 

 

Three crows O

 

A song from Scotland – this is the English adaption but there are many charming versions in the Scottish vernacular to be found on You Tube.

 

Use fingers and fist to show the birds on the wall. Mime the other movements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three crows sat upon a wall,

Sat upon a wall, sat upon a wall-all-all-all.

Three crows sat upon a wall,

On a cold and frosty morning.

 

The first crow couldn't fly at all,

Couldn't fly at all, couldn't fly at all-all-all-all.

The first crow couldn't fly at all

On a cold and frosty morning.

 

The second crow fell and broke his jaw,

Fell and broke his jaw, fell and broke his jaw-aw-aw-aw.

The second crow fell and broke his jaw,

On a cold and frosty morning.

 

The third crow was weeping for his ma,

Weeping for his ma, weeping for his ma-aa-aa-aa.

The third crow was weeping for his ma,

On a cold and frosty morning.

 

The fourth crow wasn't there at all,

Wasn't there at all, wasn't there at all-all-all-all.

The fourth crow wasn't there at all,

On a cold and frosty morning.

 

That's all I know about the crows,

Know about the crows, know about the crows-ow-ow-ows.

That's all I know about the crows,

On a cold and frosty morning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Three dinosaurs came out to play 🔊

 

 


You can start with five dinosaurs or more as with many songs it depends on the age and stamina of your audience!

1. Hold up three fingers. 2. Hand over eyes look round as if lost. 3. Stamp three times. 4. Make munching motion with arms. Repeat with two, one, and finally no dinosaurs.

Last verse: 1. Hold up "no" fingers. 2. Hand over eyes look round as if lost. 3. Make munching motion with arms. 4. Hands on hips.5. Throw out hands. 6. Crouch down with hands to the cheek.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three dinosaurs came out to play,

Out in the land of lost one day,

Along came Tyrannosaurus, Crunch! Crunch! Crunch!

And ate up a dinosaur, Munch! Munch! Munch!

 

Repeat with two, one, and finally no dinosaurs.

Last verse:

No dinosaurs came out to play,

Out in the land of lost one day,

Along came Tyrannosaurus, Crunch! Crunch! Crunch!

He stood there and shouted, "Where's my lunch?!"

Tyrannosaurus Rex did not find anything to eat,

So off she stomped and went to sleep!

 


 

 

Three little birds 🔊

 

 


A rhyme for teaching dynamics with loud and quiet voices. Also learn concepts of counting down, ordinal numbers and ‘one less’.

Melody by Dany Rosevear.

 

Show and count three fingers. Curl those fingers over the ‘nest’ a cupped palm of the other hand. These will be the three birds fast asleep.

1. Sing quietly as birds sleep. 2. Raise one finger each time a bird wakes up. Sing ‘cheep, cheep, cheep’ in a loud voice opening and closing thumb and forefinger. 3. Cross hands at wrist and make mother bird fly down, then make a beak to feed baby bird. 4. Rub tummy for ‘yum, yum, yum’ singing in a ‘middle’ voice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three little birds all fast asleep,

One little bird said, “Cheep, cheep, cheep!”

Down came mother with a big fat crumb,

And the first little bird said, “Yum, yum, yum!”

 

Two little birds both fast asleep,

One little bird said, “Cheep, cheep, cheep!”

Down came mother with a big fat crumb,

And the second little bird said, “Yum, yum, yum!”

 

One little bird still fast asleep,

One little bird said, “Cheep, cheep, cheep!”

Down came mother with a big fat crumb,

And the third little bird said, “Yum, yum, yum!”

 


 

 

Three little fish 🔊

 

 


An ocean life hand play for encouraging fast, slow and still movement.

Adapted and arranged by Dany Rosevear.

 

Hold up three fingers. Put one hand on top of the other and make swimming motion with thumbs. ‘Swim’ and sing fast. ‘Swim’ and sing slowly. Open and close hands. Hold up three fingers and put them in lap under the other hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three little fish, three little fish,

See how they swim, see how they swim,

As round and round so fast they go;

And now they’re swimming so very slow.

Watch out little fish there’s a shark down below!

Hide, three little fish, hide, three little fish!

 


 

 

 

Three little kittens O

 

The tune of this nursery rhyme was probably originally a hymn tune - it is very similar to the folk tune The seven joys of Mary. To find out more to the background of the words visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Little_Kittens

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three little kittens, they lost their mittens,

And they began to cry,

“Oh mother dear, we sadly fear,

Our mittens we have lost.”

“What lost your mittens, you naughty kittens,

Then you shall have no pie.”

“Miaow! Miaow! We shall have no pie.”

 

The three little kittens, they found their mittens,

And they began to cry,

“Oh mother dear, see here, see here!

Our mittens we have found.”

“What, found your mittens, you good little kittens,

Then you shall have some pie.”

“Purr, purr! Purr, purr! We shall have some pie.”

 

The three little kittens put on their mittens,

And soon ate up the pie;

“Oh, mother dear, we sadly fear

Our mittens we have soiled.”

“What, soiled your mittens, you naughty kittens!”

Then they began to sigh,

“Miaow! Miaow! Yes, they began to sigh.

 

The three little kittens they washed their mittens,

And hung them out to dry;

“Oh, mother dear, see here, see here,

Our mittens we have washed!”

“What, washed your mittens, you good little kittens,

But I smell a rat close by.”

“Miaow! Miaow! We smell a rat close by.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 


Three little owls O

 

 


What a noise, what a racket, then night falls and all is quiet.

A hand play song; this version of the rhyme (the first verse appears in ABC ‘The new useful book’ published 1995) has a final verse by Dany Rosevear which is great for calming lively ones down.

Other animals partnered with suitable noises can be suggested by children.

If you live in Australia find out what animals might visit a gum tree.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One little owl said, "Whoo! Whoo!"

Two little owls said, "Whoo! Whoo!"

Three little owls said, "Whoo! Whoo!"

As they sat in the old oak tree.

 

One little squirrel said, “Crunch! Crunch!"

Two little squirrels said, “Crunch! Crunch! "

Three little squirrels said, “Crunch! Crunch!

As they sat in the old oak tree.

 

One little crow said, "Caw! Caw!"

Two little crows said, "Caw! Caw!"

Three little crows said, "Caw! Caw!"

As they sat in the old oak tree.

 

One little cat said, "Meow! Meow!"

Two little cats said, "Meow! Meow!"

Three little cats said, "Meow! Meow!"

As they sat in the old oak tree.

 

Now the wind it blew, "Oooo! Oooo!"

And the rain it rained, "Pitter patter! Pitter patter!"

As the silver moon whispered, "Shhhh! Shhhh!

It’s sleepy time in the old oak tree."

 


 

 

Three little pigs and a little pig more O

 

A lesson in manners, for as the saying goes ‘manners maketh man’ and perhaps pigs too!

These verses were written by Anne Mendoza; the music by Dany Rosevear.

 

Hold up the number of fingers indicated by the words and make expressions and movements to suggest how the farmer and animals feel. Rap loudly on the door for the first two verses and quietly for the last one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three little pigs and a little pig more,

Knocked on the farmer’s bright green door:

Be quick, Mr Farmer, we want our lunch,

‘Hunch, hunch, hunch!’

 

Three little calves and a little calf more,

Knocked on the farmer’s bright green door:

Be quick, Mr Farmer, we want our lunch too,

‘Moo, moo, moo!’

 

The farmer came out with a furious roar:

‘Who’s that a-hammering at my green door?

Not a bit, not a scrap will you get from me.’

So said he.

 

Those poor little animals knocked once more,

Quietly, so quietly on the bright green door,

And asked most politely on their knees,

‘If you please!’


 

Three young rats O

 

A traditional nursery rhyme with music by Moya Smith.

According to The Oxford Nursery Rhyme Book edited by Iona Opie and

Peter Opie ‘Flats’ were, in 19th C America, broad-brimmed, low crowned straw hats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three young rats with black felt hats,

Three young ducks with white straw flats,

Three young dogs with curling tails,

Three young cats with demi veils,

Went out to walk with two young pigs,

In satin vests and sorrel wigs,

But suddenly it chanced to rain,

And so they all went home again.

 


 

 

Twinkle, twinkle traffic lights 🔊

 

 


A hand play that can also be used for outdoor traffic play scenarios as well as supporting the concepts of number to three and colour!

 

1. Wiggle fingers. 2. Hold up three fingers with one hand flashing. 3. Hold palm up facing out. Move hand forward. 4. Steer wheel slowly. 5. As before.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Twinkle, twinkle, traffic lights,

Three colours flashing bright;

Red means stop, green says go,

When it’s amber move very, very slow.

Twinkle, twinkle traffic lights,

Three colours flashing bright.

 


 

 

 

Two little eyes O

 

 


The first verse is a traditional action rhyme.

Dany Rosevear has added a melody and extra verses.

 

Point to eyes, ears, nose and mouth with appropriate movements and appreciative sounds for each last line.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Two little eyes that look around,

Two little ears to hear each sound;

One little nose to smell what’s sweet,

One little mouth that likes to eat.

 

Two little eyes see an old oak tree,

Two little ears hear humming bees;

One little nose smells honey sweet,

One old badger finds a golden/syrupy treat.

 

Two little eyes watch black ants scurrying

Two little ears hear robin sing;

One little nose smells strawberries,

Lying in a bowl for our picnic tea.

 

Two little eyes watch an acorn fall,

Two little ears hear Autumn call;

One little nose smells a mushroom sweet,

One little squirrel stores food to eat.

 


 

 

Two little eyes that blink, blink, blink 🔊

 

 


Words and music by Moiselle Renstrom, 1889–1956 from ‘Merrily We Sing’.

 

Improvise actions as suggested by the song.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Two little eyes that blink, blink, blink,

Two little eyes that see;

Head and shoulders; knees and toes;

And many more things make me.

Tra la la la la la,

Two little eyes that see,

Two little eyes that blink, blink, blink,

And many more things make me.

 


 

 

 

Way up high in the apple tree 🔊

 

 


A song for the apple picking season.

1. Make arm and hand into a tree, point upwards. 2. Make thumb and forefingers into apples, draw a smile on face. 3. Shake ‘tree’ with other hand. 4. Roll arms downwards. 5. Rub tummy and put up thumb.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Way up high in the apple tree,

Two little apples smiled at me.

I shook that tree as hard as I could,

Down fell the apples!

Mmmmh! They were good!

 


 

 

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears O

 

An action song; count to three and learn about comparative sizing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears,

Oh, what did her blue eyes see?

A bowl that was huge,

A bowl that was small,

And a bowl that was tiny, and that was all,

She counted them: one, two, three.

 

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears,

Oh, what did her blue eyes see?

A chair that was huge,

A chair that was small,

And a chair that was tiny, and that was all,

She sat in them: one, two, three.

 

 

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears,

Oh, what did her blue eyes see?

A bed that was huge,

A bed that was small,

And a bed that was tiny, and that was all,

She slept in them: one, two, three.

 

When Goldilocks went to the house of the bears,

Oh, what did her blue eyes see?

A bear that was huge,

A bear that was small,

And a bear that was tiny, and that was all,

They growled at her: GRRRH! GRRRH! GRRRH!

With hands above head make a roof shape. Thumb and forefinger make glasses to look from side to side. Indicate size of each bowl with hands.

Count with fingers.

 

As above.

 

Indicate height of each chair.

 

Hands indicate sitting then count with fingers.

 

 

 

 

 

As above.

Indicate length of each bed.

 

 

 

As above.

 

Indicate height of each bear.

 

Growl loudly with hands to face to protect others from the loud sound!

 

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