Nursery number favourites to 10 A-N

A happy green crocodile

A mosquito one

Bees come buzzing from the hive

Blackfriars

Caribbean counting rhyme

Counting song

Farmer Brown had ten green apples

Gath’ring the eggs

Good morning Mrs. Hen

Here comes the bus

Hickety picket

I have five fingers on each hand

I went up the apple tree

I’m going to build a chimney pot

I've got sixpence

I’ve got ten little fingers

Jack Jintle

Nine little planets

Last updated: 5/9/2019 6:36 PM

The songs below are compiled, illustrated and sometimes adapted

by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

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Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

A happy green crocodile O

 

 


Learn number bonds to ten.

Younger children can do the same with numbers to five.

 

One hand snaps at a number fingers on the other hand; these fingers are folded down and the others counted. Re-iterate e.g. three plus seven makes ten.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A happy green crocodile

Eats three men.

Then he has the others - how many?

1, 2, 3…

To make up to ten.


 

 

A mosquito one

 

 


Words with rhythm; learn to move to the beat. This counting game comes from Guyana in the West Indies and was collected and adapted by Doris Harper-Wills.

 

Clap hands on the first syllable of every “mosquito” and on the word “old”. Hold up fingers to correspond with the number called. On each second line make up simple actions to go with the words in the rhyme. Encourage children to come up with their own ideas.

 

A mosquito one, a mosquito two,

A mosquito jump in the old man shoe.

A mosquito three, a mosquito four,

A mosquito open the old man door.

A mosquito five, a mosquito six,

A mosquito pick up the old man sticks.

A mosquito seven, a mosquito eight,

A mosquito open the old man gate.

A mosquito nine, a mosquito ten,

A mosquito biting the old man again.

 


 

 

Bees come buzzing from the hive 🔊

 

 


A minibeast finger play.

Adapted by Dany Rosevear.

 

Verse 1: Put up a finger for each number. Make hive with curved hand on top of crossed forefingers, the bee, move out of the hive and wiggle to make it fly to outstretched hand, the flower. Point to wrist. Verse 2: As before. Put thumb and forefinger round eye then rub tummy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One, two, three, four, five,

Bees come buzzing from the hive,

Six, seven, eight, nine, ten,

Watch them buzzing round again.

Why so busy little bee?

Because there's so much work you see;

Collecting nectar from the flowers,

Takes us hours and hours and hours.

 

One, two, three, four, five,

Bees come buzzing from the hive,

Six, seven, eight, nine, ten,

Buzz around and back again.

Please tell me busy bee,

Why do you buzz so happily;

Peep inside our hive and see,

We're making honey for your tea.


 

 

 

Blackfriars O

 

 


A poem by Eleanor Farjeon for ‘Nursery rhymes of London town’: Each poem has a link with an area of London. Music by Len Rosselson from ‘Count me in’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Seven Black Friars, sitting back to back,

Fished from the bridge for a pike or a jack.

The first caught a tiddler, the second caught a crab,

The third caught a winkle, the fourth caught a dab;

The fifth caught a tadpole, the sixth caught an eel,

And the seventh one caught an old cart-wheel!


 

 

Caribbean counting rhyme 🔊

 

 


Written by the author, poet and children’s writer Pamela Mordecai, find out more about her at: https://pamelamordecai.com/in-the-top-ten/.

This could easily be used as a hand play.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One by one, one by one,

waves are dancing in the sun.

Two by two, two by two,

seashells pink and purply-blue.

Three by three, three by three,

big boats putting out to sea.

Four by four, four by four,

children fishing on the shore.

Five by five, five by five,

little walking fish arrive.

Six by six, six by six,

pelicans performing tricks.

Seven by seven, seven by seven,

puffy clouds patrolling heaven.

Eight by eight, eight by eight,

fishes nibbling juicy bait.

Nine by nine, nine by nine,

taking home a catch that’s fine.

Ten by ten, ten by ten,

tomorrow we will come again.


 

 

 

Counting song 🔊

 

 


Learn to count to ten with this Mexican folk song. Sing it steadily. Here it is played as a hand play. To find the Mexican version and a lively circle game visit: http://www.singinggamesforchildren.com/A%20Cluster%202.5%20Spanish/1-9%20spanish%20songs%20w.htm

 

Raise fingers one at a time then clap or make other movements to the rhythm of the chorus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One and two and three,

Four and five and six,

Seven, eight and nine,

Yes, I can count to ten.

 

La la la la la, La la la la la, La la la la la. x2


 

 

Farmer Brown had ten green apples O

 

Who gets the last apple! Learn to subtract from ten with this apple themed song.

To make this easier you can start from five. Change the colour to red if you prefer.

 

Put up the appropriate number of fingers each time and mime eating the apple with enthusiasm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Farmer Brown had ten green apples, hanging on a tree,

Farmer Brown had ten green apples, hanging on a tree.

He plucked one apple and ate it greedily – YUM, YUM, YUM!

Leaving nine green apples, a-hanging on a tree.

 

Farmer Brown had nine green apples, hanging on a tree,

Farmer Brown had nine green apples, hanging on a tree.

He plucked one apple and ate it greedily – YUM, YUM, YUM!

Leaving eight green apples, a-hanging on a tree.

 

Continue until there is one apple left:

...He plucked that apple and gave that one to me – MMMM!

Leaving no green apples, a-hanging on a tree.

 

 


 

 

Gath’ring the eggs O

 

 


Learn to count in twos.

Another song from ‘Singing fun’ pub1962.Words and music by Lucille F. Wood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Down on the farm, gath’ring the eggs,

Chasing away the old red hen,

How many eggs can you find?

Two, four, six, eight, ten.


 

 

Good morning Mrs Hen O

 

How many ways can you make ten? This song will help you especially if you have sets of ten chicks to colour.

Record other ways to make ten perhaps with plasticene chicks, an abacus or by drawing pictures and using numbers to record the outcome.

Put up fingers to show numbers of chicks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


‘Chook, chook, chook, chook, chook,

‘Good morning Mrs. Hen,

How many chickens have you got?’

‘Madam I've got ten;

One of them is yellow,

One of them is brown,

Eight of them are speckled red,

The finest chicks in town!’

 

Chook, chook, chook, chook, chook,

‘Good morning Mrs. Hen,

How many chickens have you got?’

‘Madam I've got ten;

Two of them are yellow,

Two of them are brown,

Six of them are speckled red,

The finest chicks in town!’

 

Chook, chook, chook, chook, chook,

‘Good morning Mrs. Hen,

How many chickens have you got?’

‘Madam I've got ten;

Three of them are yellow,

Three of them are brown,,

Four of them are speckled red,

The finest chicks in town!’

 

Chook, chook, chook, chook, chook,

‘Good morning Mrs. Hen,

How many chickens have you got?’

‘Madam I've got ten;

Four of them are yellow,

Four of them are brown,

Two of them are speckled red,

The finest chicks in town!’

 

Chook, chook, chook, chook, chook,

‘Good morning Mrs. Hen,

How many chickens have you got?’

‘Madam I've got ten;

Five of them are yellow,

Five of them are brown,

None of them are speckled red,

The finest chicks in town!’

 


 

 

Here comes the bus 🔊

 

 


Music by Dany Rosevear.

A good way to understand counting, counting on or number bonds to five or ten Provide a laminated bus and encourage children to draw pictures of themselves to attach and then record with number sentences. Other ideas include rolling two dice and counting on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Here comes the bus,

It's going to stop!

Hurry up children,

And in you hop.

Four inside

And six on top.

How many children have you got?


 

 

 

Hickety Pickety O

 

A nursery favourite that encourages counting to ten and will help to distinguish left from right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Hickety Pickety my black hen,

She lays eggs for gentlemen.

Gentlemen come every day,

To see what my black hen will lay.

 

Hickety Pickety my black hen,

She lays eggs for gentlemen.

Sometimes nine and sometimes ten,

Hickety Pickety my black hen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Put one finger up in sequence for each number. Put one down each time when counting backwards.

 

SPOKEN:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10!

Well done little black hen!

Can you count back again?!

10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1


 

 

I have five fingers on each hand 🔊

 

 


Identify parts of the face and body and what they can do. Enjoy the specialness of ‘me’.

You will need to be sensitive to children in the class who might not have the full complement.

 

Hold up both hands and wiggle fingers. Show ten fingers the point to toes, ears, eyes, nose and mouth.

Clap hands, tap, feet, cup hands behind ears, wiggle nose and point to mouth then self.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I have five fingers on each hand,

Ten toes on my two feet.

Two ears, two eyes,

One nose, one mouth,

With which to sweetly speak.

 

My hands can clap, my feet can tap,

My eyes can clearly see.

My ears can hear,

My nose can sniff,

My mouth can say, “I’m me!”


 

 

I went up the apple tree 🔊

 

 


Based on a traditional Irish counting out rhyme.

Move a ball to a steady beat and count and catch up to ten. If the class is large divide into two or three circles

 

Sit in a circle. One child has an ‘apple’ - a ball or a beanbag and this is passed round the circle in time with the beat. On the word ‘buy’ the child holding the ‘apple’ moves into the centre and bounces the ball or throws and catches the beanbag until it drops or ten is reached. Those in the circle count along with the one in the middle. This child then sits outside the circle and the game begins again until everyone has thrown or bounced the ball.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I went up the apple tree,

All the apples fell on me.

Apple pudding, apple pie,

How many apples should I buy?


 

 

 

I’m going to build a chimney pot O

 

 


A traditional rhyme with music by Harriet Powell, adapted by Dany Rosevear.

 

Have wooden bricks ready for building. Children take turns to decide how many bricks tall the chimney will be. 1. Put one fist on top of the other climbing upwards. 2. Build bricks up to ten. 3. Hands show movement of the wind and rain. 4. Child who built chimney gets to knock it down!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I’m going to build a chimney pot

Very, very high.

I’ll build it with my bricks,

And I’ll make it touch the sky – 1, 2, 3….

Here’s the wind and here’s the rain

To knock my chimney down again.

 


 

 

I've got sixpence O

 

 


There are many variations on this song that started as the nursery rhyme ‘I love sixpence’ The one below is familiar in the scouting movement and was popular with all the forces in England, the U.S.A. and Australia..We sang something similar to the one below on the way to school in an army truck in Malaya in the 1950s.

Find out more at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=92279.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I've got sixpence; jolly, jolly sixpence,

I've got sixpence to last me all my life!

I've a penny to spend, and a penny to lend,

And fourpence to take home to my wife.

CHORUS

No cares have I to worry me,

No clock upon the wall to hurry me.

I'm as happy as a lark, believe me,

As I go rolling home.

Rolling home, rolling home,

As I go rolling home.

I'm as happy as a lark, believe me,

As I go rolling home.

 

I've got fourpence; jolly, jolly fourpence,

I've got fourpence to last me all my life!

I've a penny to spend, and a penny to lend,

And tuppence to take home to my wife. CHORUS

 

I've got tuppence; jolly, jolly tuppence,

I've got tuppence to last me all my life!

I've a penny to spend, and a penny to lend,

And nothing to take home to my wife. CHORUS

 

I've got nothing, jolly, jolly nothing,

I've got nothing to last me all my life!

I've got nothing to spend, and nothing to lend,

And nothing to take home to my wife. Poor wife!

 


 

 

I’ve got ten little fingers O

 

Learn number correspondence with this song and to distinguish between left and right.

The first verse is traditional the second two are composed by Dany Rosevear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


I’ve got ten little fingers

And ten little toes,

Two little eyes

And one little nose!

 

My left hand has five fingers,

And there’s five on my right.

My nose has two nostrils

And my smile is very bright!

 

I’ve got ten nails on my fingers

And ten nails on my toes,

Two blinking eyelids

And a sneeze inside my nose!

ATCHOO!

 


 

 

Jack Jintle O

 

This song was probably the precursor of the much more familiar ‘Nick nack paddy wack’. It is from Manchester.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My name is Jack Jintle, the eldest but one,

And I can play nick-nack upon my own thumb,

With a nick-nack and padlock and sing a fine song,

And all you fine ladies come dancing along.

 

My name is Jack Jintle, the eldest but two,

And I can play nick-nack upon my own shoe…

 

My name is Jack Jintle, the eldest but three,

And I can play nick-nack upon my own knee…

 

My name is Jack Jintle, the eldest but four,

And I can play nick-nack upon my own door…

 

Five… hive…

 

Six… sticks…

 

Seven… right up there in heaven…

 

Eight… gate….

 

Nine… line…

 

Ten… hen…

 

 


 

Nine little planets O

 

 


Learn the number, names and order of the planets in our solar system. Since the 1930s when Pluto was discovered children learnt there were nine planets; in 2006, however, Pluto was reassigned as a dwarf planet so there are now only eight ‘proper’ ones.

Update: Astronomers are now surmising there is indeed a ninth planet, ‘Planet Nine’, in the outer reaches of our solar system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


One little, two little, three little planets,

Four little, five little, six little planets,

Seven little, eight little, nine little planets

Orbiting round the sun.

 

Mercury is nearest and then comes Venus,

Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus,

Neptune’s next, little Pluto’s the furthest,

Orbiting round the sun.

 

Go outside and look at the night sky,

See each planet shining brightly,

Big ones, small ones, spinning and twinkling,

Orbiting round the sun.

 


 

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